Limits...
Changes in the distribution of mechanically dependent plants along a gradient of past hurricane impact.

Batke SP, Kelly DL - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: The severity of the effects that large disturbance events such as hurricanes can have on the forest canopy and the associated mechanically dependent plant community (epiphytes, climbers, etc.) is dependent on the frequency and intensity of the disturbance events.For holo- and hemi-epiphytes, we found that diversity was significantly negatively related to past hurricane impact.We believe that more emphasis needs to be placed on the effects that past disturbance events have on mechanically dependent plant communities, particularly in areas that are prone to catastrophic perturbations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland Trinity Centre for Biodiversity Research, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland Operation Wallacea, Hope House, Old Bolingbroke, Lincolnshire PE23 4EX, UK batkesp@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Mean dependent plant abundance correlated to mean branch height across the different hurricane impact levels. The dashed line represents the line of best fit and the grey-shaded areas are the 95 % confidence limits. The number of branches that were included in the analysis between the different impact levels is noted at the bottom of each graph. Note that only a total of 60 branches were randomly selected for the final analysis.
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PLV096F4: Mean dependent plant abundance correlated to mean branch height across the different hurricane impact levels. The dashed line represents the line of best fit and the grey-shaded areas are the 95 % confidence limits. The number of branches that were included in the analysis between the different impact levels is noted at the bottom of each graph. Note that only a total of 60 branches were randomly selected for the final analysis.

Mentions: The abundance of dependent plants with distance to the tree centre did not change with increased hurricane impact (P > 0.05). However, the relationship between dependent plant abundance and height in the tree varied in relation to hurricane impact level (t = 2.02, DF = 1182, R2 = 0.1, P < 0.05). Dependent plant abundance decreased with level of hurricane impact on a branch level. Overall, abundance was highest on branches located on the lower parts of the tree in areas where hurricane impact was low, and lowest on branches located on the lower parts of the tree in areas where hurricane impact was high. However, the data fit was low (Fig. 4).Figure 4.


Changes in the distribution of mechanically dependent plants along a gradient of past hurricane impact.

Batke SP, Kelly DL - AoB Plants (2015)

Mean dependent plant abundance correlated to mean branch height across the different hurricane impact levels. The dashed line represents the line of best fit and the grey-shaded areas are the 95 % confidence limits. The number of branches that were included in the analysis between the different impact levels is noted at the bottom of each graph. Note that only a total of 60 branches were randomly selected for the final analysis.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584959&req=5

PLV096F4: Mean dependent plant abundance correlated to mean branch height across the different hurricane impact levels. The dashed line represents the line of best fit and the grey-shaded areas are the 95 % confidence limits. The number of branches that were included in the analysis between the different impact levels is noted at the bottom of each graph. Note that only a total of 60 branches were randomly selected for the final analysis.
Mentions: The abundance of dependent plants with distance to the tree centre did not change with increased hurricane impact (P > 0.05). However, the relationship between dependent plant abundance and height in the tree varied in relation to hurricane impact level (t = 2.02, DF = 1182, R2 = 0.1, P < 0.05). Dependent plant abundance decreased with level of hurricane impact on a branch level. Overall, abundance was highest on branches located on the lower parts of the tree in areas where hurricane impact was low, and lowest on branches located on the lower parts of the tree in areas where hurricane impact was high. However, the data fit was low (Fig. 4).Figure 4.

Bottom Line: The severity of the effects that large disturbance events such as hurricanes can have on the forest canopy and the associated mechanically dependent plant community (epiphytes, climbers, etc.) is dependent on the frequency and intensity of the disturbance events.For holo- and hemi-epiphytes, we found that diversity was significantly negatively related to past hurricane impact.We believe that more emphasis needs to be placed on the effects that past disturbance events have on mechanically dependent plant communities, particularly in areas that are prone to catastrophic perturbations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Botany, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, College Green, Dublin 2, Ireland Trinity Centre for Biodiversity Research, Trinity College, The University of Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland Operation Wallacea, Hope House, Old Bolingbroke, Lincolnshire PE23 4EX, UK batkesp@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.