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Comparison of swimming capacity and energetics of migratory European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and New Zealand short-finned eel (A. australis).

Tudorache C, Burgerhout E, Brittijn S, van den Thillart G - Front Physiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Since these species are expected to show adaptive traits to such an important lifetime event, we hypothesized differences in swimming capacity and energetics as a response to this adaptation.With a similar body length and mass, European eels showed ca. 25% higher values for both Ucrit and Uopt, and 23% lower values for COTmin, compared to New Zealand short-finned eels.However, SMR, AMRcrit, AMRopt, and scope for activity did not differ between the species, indicating very similar swimming physiology traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Animal Sciences and Health, Institute Biology Leiden, Leiden University Leiden, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The spawning migration of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) can cover more than 6000 km, while that of the New Zealand short-finned eel (A. australis) is assumed to be approximately 3000 km. Since these species are expected to show adaptive traits to such an important lifetime event, we hypothesized differences in swimming capacity and energetics as a response to this adaptation. In an experimental swimming respirometer set-up, critical swimming speed (Ucrit), optimal swimming speed (Uopt), mass specific oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate at Ucrit (AMRcrit) and at Uopt (AMRopt), the minimum cost of transport at Uopt (COTmin), and the scope for activity, were assessed and compared between the species. With a similar body length and mass, European eels showed ca. 25% higher values for both Ucrit and Uopt, and 23% lower values for COTmin, compared to New Zealand short-finned eels. However, SMR, AMRcrit, AMRopt, and scope for activity did not differ between the species, indicating very similar swimming physiology traits. This study discusses physiological aspects of long distance migration and provides recommendations for (a) swimming respirometry in anguilliform fish, and (b) telemetry research using externally attached pop-up tags.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relative oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2, mgO2 kg−1 h−1) as a function of swimming speed (U, m s−1) for EU (full circles) and NZ (empty circles). Exponential function ṀO2 = SMRecU, with SMR the standard metabolic rate, e Euler's constant and c constant, and U swimming speed (for values see Table 1). Data are mean ± SE, r2 = 8.9 ± 2.2. Curve fitting data are given in Table 1. *indicates significant difference between species at the respective speed: t-test, p < 0.05, N = 7.
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Figure 1: Relative oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2, mgO2 kg−1 h−1) as a function of swimming speed (U, m s−1) for EU (full circles) and NZ (empty circles). Exponential function ṀO2 = SMRecU, with SMR the standard metabolic rate, e Euler's constant and c constant, and U swimming speed (for values see Table 1). Data are mean ± SE, r2 = 8.9 ± 2.2. Curve fitting data are given in Table 1. *indicates significant difference between species at the respective speed: t-test, p < 0.05, N = 7.

Mentions: Oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2, mgO2kg−1 h−1, see Figure 1) was expressed as a exponential function of swimming speed (U, m s−1): ṀO2 = SMRecU, with SMR the standard metabolic rate, e Euler's constant, and c constant. From this function, optimal swimming speed (Uopt, m s−1), minimum Cost of Transport (COTmin, mgO2 kg−1 km−1), active metabolic rate at Uopt (AMRopt, mgO2kg−1 h−1), and at Ucrit, the critical swimming speed (AMRcrit) and the scope for activity (mgO2kg−1h−1) were derived. Values are mean ± SE, significance was accepted at p < 0.05 (bold), t-test, N = 7.


Comparison of swimming capacity and energetics of migratory European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and New Zealand short-finned eel (A. australis).

Tudorache C, Burgerhout E, Brittijn S, van den Thillart G - Front Physiol (2015)

Relative oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2, mgO2 kg−1 h−1) as a function of swimming speed (U, m s−1) for EU (full circles) and NZ (empty circles). Exponential function ṀO2 = SMRecU, with SMR the standard metabolic rate, e Euler's constant and c constant, and U swimming speed (for values see Table 1). Data are mean ± SE, r2 = 8.9 ± 2.2. Curve fitting data are given in Table 1. *indicates significant difference between species at the respective speed: t-test, p < 0.05, N = 7.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584949&req=5

Figure 1: Relative oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2, mgO2 kg−1 h−1) as a function of swimming speed (U, m s−1) for EU (full circles) and NZ (empty circles). Exponential function ṀO2 = SMRecU, with SMR the standard metabolic rate, e Euler's constant and c constant, and U swimming speed (for values see Table 1). Data are mean ± SE, r2 = 8.9 ± 2.2. Curve fitting data are given in Table 1. *indicates significant difference between species at the respective speed: t-test, p < 0.05, N = 7.
Mentions: Oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2, mgO2kg−1 h−1, see Figure 1) was expressed as a exponential function of swimming speed (U, m s−1): ṀO2 = SMRecU, with SMR the standard metabolic rate, e Euler's constant, and c constant. From this function, optimal swimming speed (Uopt, m s−1), minimum Cost of Transport (COTmin, mgO2 kg−1 km−1), active metabolic rate at Uopt (AMRopt, mgO2kg−1 h−1), and at Ucrit, the critical swimming speed (AMRcrit) and the scope for activity (mgO2kg−1h−1) were derived. Values are mean ± SE, significance was accepted at p < 0.05 (bold), t-test, N = 7.

Bottom Line: Since these species are expected to show adaptive traits to such an important lifetime event, we hypothesized differences in swimming capacity and energetics as a response to this adaptation.With a similar body length and mass, European eels showed ca. 25% higher values for both Ucrit and Uopt, and 23% lower values for COTmin, compared to New Zealand short-finned eels.However, SMR, AMRcrit, AMRopt, and scope for activity did not differ between the species, indicating very similar swimming physiology traits.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department for Animal Sciences and Health, Institute Biology Leiden, Leiden University Leiden, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The spawning migration of the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) can cover more than 6000 km, while that of the New Zealand short-finned eel (A. australis) is assumed to be approximately 3000 km. Since these species are expected to show adaptive traits to such an important lifetime event, we hypothesized differences in swimming capacity and energetics as a response to this adaptation. In an experimental swimming respirometer set-up, critical swimming speed (Ucrit), optimal swimming speed (Uopt), mass specific oxygen consumption rate (ṀO2), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate at Ucrit (AMRcrit) and at Uopt (AMRopt), the minimum cost of transport at Uopt (COTmin), and the scope for activity, were assessed and compared between the species. With a similar body length and mass, European eels showed ca. 25% higher values for both Ucrit and Uopt, and 23% lower values for COTmin, compared to New Zealand short-finned eels. However, SMR, AMRcrit, AMRopt, and scope for activity did not differ between the species, indicating very similar swimming physiology traits. This study discusses physiological aspects of long distance migration and provides recommendations for (a) swimming respirometry in anguilliform fish, and (b) telemetry research using externally attached pop-up tags.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus