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Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase and its closely related kinase genes in Capsicum annuum.

Cai H, Cheng J, Yan Y, Xiao Z, Li J, Mou S, Qiu A, Lai Y, Guan D, He S - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events.Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin.Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Plant Genetic Improvement and Comprehensive Utilization, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University Fuzhou, China ; College of Life Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University Fuzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a genome wide comprehensive analysis of genes encoding CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs) was performed in pepper, a total of 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and 8 CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differences in the deduced amino acid sequences of five CDPK genes between pepper cultivars Chiltepin and CM334. Chiltepin-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from Chiltepin. CM334-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from CM334. The red box: the detailed differences in the amino acid.
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Figure 1: Differences in the deduced amino acid sequences of five CDPK genes between pepper cultivars Chiltepin and CM334. Chiltepin-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from Chiltepin. CM334-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from CM334. The red box: the detailed differences in the amino acid.

Mentions: CDPKs in the pepper variety Chiltepin were also identified and CDPKs in the two pepper germplasms were compared. The sequences of the majority of the CDPK family members in the two germplasms were the same, except in the case of CaCDPK6, CaCDPK7, CaCDPK10, CaCDPK12, and CaCDPK14, in which different sequences of the same gene were found in the two germplasms (Figure 1). Moreover, CaCDPK31, which is present in CM334, was not found in Chiltepin.


Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase and its closely related kinase genes in Capsicum annuum.

Cai H, Cheng J, Yan Y, Xiao Z, Li J, Mou S, Qiu A, Lai Y, Guan D, He S - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Differences in the deduced amino acid sequences of five CDPK genes between pepper cultivars Chiltepin and CM334. Chiltepin-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from Chiltepin. CM334-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from CM334. The red box: the detailed differences in the amino acid.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584942&req=5

Figure 1: Differences in the deduced amino acid sequences of five CDPK genes between pepper cultivars Chiltepin and CM334. Chiltepin-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from Chiltepin. CM334-CDPK: the deduced amino acid sequences of CDPK genes from CM334. The red box: the detailed differences in the amino acid.
Mentions: CDPKs in the pepper variety Chiltepin were also identified and CDPKs in the two pepper germplasms were compared. The sequences of the majority of the CDPK family members in the two germplasms were the same, except in the case of CaCDPK6, CaCDPK7, CaCDPK10, CaCDPK12, and CaCDPK14, in which different sequences of the same gene were found in the two germplasms (Figure 1). Moreover, CaCDPK31, which is present in CM334, was not found in Chiltepin.

Bottom Line: Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events.Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin.Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Education Ministry, Key Laboratory of Plant Genetic Improvement and Comprehensive Utilization, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University Fuzhou, China ; College of Life Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University Fuzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) play important roles in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a genome wide comprehensive analysis of genes encoding CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs) was performed in pepper, a total of 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CDPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the C. annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and 8 CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus