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Designing and testing regenerative pulp treatment strategies: modeling the transdentinal transport mechanisms.

Passos AD, Mouza AA, Paras SV, Gogos C, Tziafas D - Front Physiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The need for simulation models to thoroughly test the inflammatory effects of dental materials and dentinogenic effects of specific signaling molecules has been well recognized in current dental research.The present protocol study is part of an ongoing investigation on the development of a methodology that can calculate the transport rate of selected molecules inside a typical dentinal tubule.In that framework we propose a simple algorithm that, given the type of molecules of the therapeutic agent and the maximum acceptable time for the drug concentration to attain a required value at the pulpal side of the tubules, can estimate the initial concentration to be imposed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The need for simulation models to thoroughly test the inflammatory effects of dental materials and dentinogenic effects of specific signaling molecules has been well recognized in current dental research. The development of a model that simulates the transdentinal flow and the mass transfer mechanisms is of prime importance in terms of achieving the objectives of developing more effective treatment modalities in restorative dentistry. The present protocol study is part of an ongoing investigation on the development of a methodology that can calculate the transport rate of selected molecules inside a typical dentinal tubule. The transport rate of biological molecules has been investigated using a validated CFD code. In that framework we propose a simple algorithm that, given the type of molecules of the therapeutic agent and the maximum acceptable time for the drug concentration to attain a required value at the pulpal side of the tubules, can estimate the initial concentration to be imposed.

No MeSH data available.


μ-LIF experimental setup.
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Figure 1: μ-LIF experimental setup.

Mentions: As already mentioned, for the experimental study of the diffusion in μ-channels and for validating the CFD code, the non-intrusive micro Laser Induced Fluorescence (μ-LIF) technique was employed. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is an optical measuring technique used to measure instant whole-field concentration maps in liquid and gaseous flows. This can be done indirectly by measuring the light emitted (i.e., fluorescence) by the tracer compounds that are used to mark the fluids. The LIF experimental setup, available in our Lab, is shown in Figure 1. The experiments were performed in a glass capillary (ID = 580μm, L = 3 cm). The measuring section was illuminated by a double cavity Nd:YAG Laser emitting at 532 nm. The fluid flux was measured by a high sensitivity CCD camera (Hisense MkII), connected to a Nikon (Eclipse LV150) microscope, which moves along the vertical axis with an accuracy of one micron. A 10X air immersion objective with NA = 0.20 was used. For each measurement at least 20 images were acquired at a sampling rate of 5 Hz.


Designing and testing regenerative pulp treatment strategies: modeling the transdentinal transport mechanisms.

Passos AD, Mouza AA, Paras SV, Gogos C, Tziafas D - Front Physiol (2015)

μ-LIF experimental setup.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584931&req=5

Figure 1: μ-LIF experimental setup.
Mentions: As already mentioned, for the experimental study of the diffusion in μ-channels and for validating the CFD code, the non-intrusive micro Laser Induced Fluorescence (μ-LIF) technique was employed. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) is an optical measuring technique used to measure instant whole-field concentration maps in liquid and gaseous flows. This can be done indirectly by measuring the light emitted (i.e., fluorescence) by the tracer compounds that are used to mark the fluids. The LIF experimental setup, available in our Lab, is shown in Figure 1. The experiments were performed in a glass capillary (ID = 580μm, L = 3 cm). The measuring section was illuminated by a double cavity Nd:YAG Laser emitting at 532 nm. The fluid flux was measured by a high sensitivity CCD camera (Hisense MkII), connected to a Nikon (Eclipse LV150) microscope, which moves along the vertical axis with an accuracy of one micron. A 10X air immersion objective with NA = 0.20 was used. For each measurement at least 20 images were acquired at a sampling rate of 5 Hz.

Bottom Line: The need for simulation models to thoroughly test the inflammatory effects of dental materials and dentinogenic effects of specific signaling molecules has been well recognized in current dental research.The present protocol study is part of an ongoing investigation on the development of a methodology that can calculate the transport rate of selected molecules inside a typical dentinal tubule.In that framework we propose a simple algorithm that, given the type of molecules of the therapeutic agent and the maximum acceptable time for the drug concentration to attain a required value at the pulpal side of the tubules, can estimate the initial concentration to be imposed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The need for simulation models to thoroughly test the inflammatory effects of dental materials and dentinogenic effects of specific signaling molecules has been well recognized in current dental research. The development of a model that simulates the transdentinal flow and the mass transfer mechanisms is of prime importance in terms of achieving the objectives of developing more effective treatment modalities in restorative dentistry. The present protocol study is part of an ongoing investigation on the development of a methodology that can calculate the transport rate of selected molecules inside a typical dentinal tubule. The transport rate of biological molecules has been investigated using a validated CFD code. In that framework we propose a simple algorithm that, given the type of molecules of the therapeutic agent and the maximum acceptable time for the drug concentration to attain a required value at the pulpal side of the tubules, can estimate the initial concentration to be imposed.

No MeSH data available.