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Parents' Perceptions and Adherence to Children's Diet and Activity Recommendations: the 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study.

Briefel RR, Deming DM, Reidy KC - Prev Chronic Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: About 56% of toddlers and 71% of preschoolers met the recommendation of at least 1 hour of daily outdoor play.About 56% of toddlers and 52% of preschoolers met the recommendation to limit consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.Health care providers can play a vital role because they are an important and early point of contact for parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mathematica Policy Research, 1100 1st Street, NE 12th floor, Washington, DC 20002-4221. E-mail: rbriefel@mathematica-mpr.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Solving the childhood obesity problem will require strategies for changes in policy, the environment, the community, and the family. Filling the data gap for children younger than 4 years could facilitate interventions aimed at this critical age group. The objective of this study was to describe parents' and caregivers' perceptions of the healthfulness of their young child's diet and body weight and to assess their adherence to the American Academy of Pediatrics' 5-2-1-0 recommendations.

Methods: We conducted a descriptive analysis of parents' and caregivers' survey data for 887 infants younger than 12 months, 925 toddlers aged 12 to 23.9 months, and 1,461 preschoolers aged 24 to 47.9 months. Data were from the national, cross-sectional 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS).

Results: Most parents considered their child's weight to be about right but were more likely to think their child was underweight (8%-9%) than overweight (2%-3%). Most parents thought their child consumed enough fruits and vegetables: however, only 30% of preschoolers met the recommendation for 5 daily servings. Only 2% of toddlers met the recommendation for no screen time, whereas 79% of preschoolers met the recommendation to limit daily screen time to 2 hours or less. About 56% of toddlers and 71% of preschoolers met the recommendation of at least 1 hour of daily outdoor play. About 56% of toddlers and 52% of preschoolers met the recommendation to limit consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Conclusion: The FITS 2008 findings underscore the ongoing need for research on policies and strategies to prevent childhood obesity from infancy through preschool. Health care providers can play a vital role because they are an important and early point of contact for parents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Total daily screen time from computer, video games, television, videos, and DVDs increases with age among toddlers and preschoolers (n = 2,093) according to data from the 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (9–12). Total screen time is categorized as none, less than 1 hour a day, 1 to 2 hours a day, and more than 2 hours a day. Children whose records were missing data on screen time were excluded from the analysis. Totals may not sum to 100% because of rounding.Daily screen timeToddlersTwo-year-oldsThree-year-oldsaNone211<1 hour/day 6044361-2 hours/day253840More than 2 hours/day 131724a Does not total 100 because of rounding.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Total daily screen time from computer, video games, television, videos, and DVDs increases with age among toddlers and preschoolers (n = 2,093) according to data from the 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (9–12). Total screen time is categorized as none, less than 1 hour a day, 1 to 2 hours a day, and more than 2 hours a day. Children whose records were missing data on screen time were excluded from the analysis. Totals may not sum to 100% because of rounding.Daily screen timeToddlersTwo-year-oldsThree-year-oldsaNone211<1 hour/day 6044361-2 hours/day253840More than 2 hours/day 131724a Does not total 100 because of rounding.

Mentions: The AAP recommends that children limit daily media exposure and screen time (9,10,16,17). The FITS 2008 data show that watching television, videos, and DVDs is a prevalent behavior by age 1 year; 74% of toddlers watched TV, videos, or DVDs (Table 1). Only 2% of toddlers in the FITS 2008 met the AAP recommendation for no screen time; about 60% had less than 1 hour per day (Figure). About 17% of 2-year-olds and 24% of 3-year-olds exceeded the AAP recommendation for no more than 2 hours of (quality) combined screen time. For preschoolers aged 24 to 47.9 months, 21% (SE, 1.84) exceeded 2 hours of average daily screen time (data not shown in figure). About 2.5% (SE 0.78) of toddlers, 2.4% (SE, 0.68) of 2-year-olds, and 4.6% (SE, 1.21) of 3-year-olds watched more than 4 hours of television, videos, or DVDs daily (data not shown in table or figure). Among children who watched any television, videos, or DVDs, 15% of toddlers and 21% of preschoolers did so where they slept (Table 1).


Parents' Perceptions and Adherence to Children's Diet and Activity Recommendations: the 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study.

Briefel RR, Deming DM, Reidy KC - Prev Chronic Dis (2015)

Total daily screen time from computer, video games, television, videos, and DVDs increases with age among toddlers and preschoolers (n = 2,093) according to data from the 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (9–12). Total screen time is categorized as none, less than 1 hour a day, 1 to 2 hours a day, and more than 2 hours a day. Children whose records were missing data on screen time were excluded from the analysis. Totals may not sum to 100% because of rounding.Daily screen timeToddlersTwo-year-oldsThree-year-oldsaNone211<1 hour/day 6044361-2 hours/day253840More than 2 hours/day 131724a Does not total 100 because of rounding.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4584477&req=5

Figure 1: Total daily screen time from computer, video games, television, videos, and DVDs increases with age among toddlers and preschoolers (n = 2,093) according to data from the 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (9–12). Total screen time is categorized as none, less than 1 hour a day, 1 to 2 hours a day, and more than 2 hours a day. Children whose records were missing data on screen time were excluded from the analysis. Totals may not sum to 100% because of rounding.Daily screen timeToddlersTwo-year-oldsThree-year-oldsaNone211<1 hour/day 6044361-2 hours/day253840More than 2 hours/day 131724a Does not total 100 because of rounding.
Mentions: The AAP recommends that children limit daily media exposure and screen time (9,10,16,17). The FITS 2008 data show that watching television, videos, and DVDs is a prevalent behavior by age 1 year; 74% of toddlers watched TV, videos, or DVDs (Table 1). Only 2% of toddlers in the FITS 2008 met the AAP recommendation for no screen time; about 60% had less than 1 hour per day (Figure). About 17% of 2-year-olds and 24% of 3-year-olds exceeded the AAP recommendation for no more than 2 hours of (quality) combined screen time. For preschoolers aged 24 to 47.9 months, 21% (SE, 1.84) exceeded 2 hours of average daily screen time (data not shown in figure). About 2.5% (SE 0.78) of toddlers, 2.4% (SE, 0.68) of 2-year-olds, and 4.6% (SE, 1.21) of 3-year-olds watched more than 4 hours of television, videos, or DVDs daily (data not shown in table or figure). Among children who watched any television, videos, or DVDs, 15% of toddlers and 21% of preschoolers did so where they slept (Table 1).

Bottom Line: About 56% of toddlers and 71% of preschoolers met the recommendation of at least 1 hour of daily outdoor play.About 56% of toddlers and 52% of preschoolers met the recommendation to limit consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.Health care providers can play a vital role because they are an important and early point of contact for parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mathematica Policy Research, 1100 1st Street, NE 12th floor, Washington, DC 20002-4221. E-mail: rbriefel@mathematica-mpr.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Solving the childhood obesity problem will require strategies for changes in policy, the environment, the community, and the family. Filling the data gap for children younger than 4 years could facilitate interventions aimed at this critical age group. The objective of this study was to describe parents' and caregivers' perceptions of the healthfulness of their young child's diet and body weight and to assess their adherence to the American Academy of Pediatrics' 5-2-1-0 recommendations.

Methods: We conducted a descriptive analysis of parents' and caregivers' survey data for 887 infants younger than 12 months, 925 toddlers aged 12 to 23.9 months, and 1,461 preschoolers aged 24 to 47.9 months. Data were from the national, cross-sectional 2008 Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS).

Results: Most parents considered their child's weight to be about right but were more likely to think their child was underweight (8%-9%) than overweight (2%-3%). Most parents thought their child consumed enough fruits and vegetables: however, only 30% of preschoolers met the recommendation for 5 daily servings. Only 2% of toddlers met the recommendation for no screen time, whereas 79% of preschoolers met the recommendation to limit daily screen time to 2 hours or less. About 56% of toddlers and 71% of preschoolers met the recommendation of at least 1 hour of daily outdoor play. About 56% of toddlers and 52% of preschoolers met the recommendation to limit consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages.

Conclusion: The FITS 2008 findings underscore the ongoing need for research on policies and strategies to prevent childhood obesity from infancy through preschool. Health care providers can play a vital role because they are an important and early point of contact for parents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus