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Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experiments were conducted in a custom-built aquarium with opaque sides and transparent front. A clear barrier was fixed in place between the medusa and the fish, and an opaque barrier could be inserted between the fish and the target. The two opaque lids over the top each contained four colored LEDs, which could be changed out for the trials.
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BIO012138F7: Experiments were conducted in a custom-built aquarium with opaque sides and transparent front. A clear barrier was fixed in place between the medusa and the fish, and an opaque barrier could be inserted between the fish and the target. The two opaque lids over the top each contained four colored LEDs, which could be changed out for the trials.

Mentions: Predators (medusae) and prey (fish) were placed in custom-built acrylic tanks (33.75 cm×18.75 cm×22.5 cm). The back and sides of the tanks were opaque black, and the front was transparent. The tanks had two black lids, each with 4 holes for embedding light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs of the treatment color (blue, yellow, or white) were evenly distributed to uniformly illuminate the tank (Fig. 7). This mimicked a natural setting (both fish and jellyfish illuminated), and ensured the observer could see the fish at all times.Fig. 7.


Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Experiments were conducted in a custom-built aquarium with opaque sides and transparent front. A clear barrier was fixed in place between the medusa and the fish, and an opaque barrier could be inserted between the fish and the target. The two opaque lids over the top each contained four colored LEDs, which could be changed out for the trials.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582119&req=5

BIO012138F7: Experiments were conducted in a custom-built aquarium with opaque sides and transparent front. A clear barrier was fixed in place between the medusa and the fish, and an opaque barrier could be inserted between the fish and the target. The two opaque lids over the top each contained four colored LEDs, which could be changed out for the trials.
Mentions: Predators (medusae) and prey (fish) were placed in custom-built acrylic tanks (33.75 cm×18.75 cm×22.5 cm). The back and sides of the tanks were opaque black, and the front was transparent. The tanks had two black lids, each with 4 holes for embedding light-emitting diodes (LEDs). LEDs of the treatment color (blue, yellow, or white) were evenly distributed to uniformly illuminate the tank (Fig. 7). This mimicked a natural setting (both fish and jellyfish illuminated), and ensured the observer could see the fish at all times.Fig. 7.

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus