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Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Underwater housing for laser pointer used for in-situ experiments. Laser was first modified by connecting a magnetic reed switch across leads of the push-button actuator. The housing was built from plumbing hardware, using a PVC union joint which had the pipe fitting opposite the O-ring removed and replaced with a clear acrylic disk. A neodymium magnet outside the tube can be rotated to activate the reed switch inside the tube.
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BIO012138F4: Underwater housing for laser pointer used for in-situ experiments. Laser was first modified by connecting a magnetic reed switch across leads of the push-button actuator. The housing was built from plumbing hardware, using a PVC union joint which had the pipe fitting opposite the O-ring removed and replaced with a clear acrylic disk. A neodymium magnet outside the tube can be rotated to activate the reed switch inside the tube.

Mentions: To observe the natural responses of fishes to illuminated dots, similar to the view of fluorescent tentacle tips, we constructed an underwater housing for a green laser pointer (Fig. 4), and tested it in several locations as well as in aquaria. During the day, use of the green laser underwater elicited aggressive responses from many fish living on and around coral reefs, especially in sandy patches (Fig. 5; supplementary material Movie 1). Fish made repeated strikes at the point where the laser shone on the substrate. At the Great Barrier Reef, Australia these responses were most pronounced among the benthic species, including blennies (Enchelyurus spp.), Chromis, lizardfish (Synodus jaculum), gleaners such as wrasses (e.g. the black-spot wrasse, blue-headed wrasse), and goatfish (Mullidae, e.g. Mulloidichthys sp,, Parupeneus sp.). Blennies showed territorial behavior and aggressively chased the spot only for a few centimeters, but wrasses and goatfish pursued the spot persistently for many minutes and across many meters. In Western Papua, many kinds of fish, including young damselfish (Pomacentrus sp.), triggerfish (Balistapus sp.), wrasses and snappers (Lutjanus biguttatus) showed interest and aggression at the dot, including following it across the bottom and biting at it. At night, when the beam was relatively much brighter in the darkness, fish avoided the green beam of light, often swimming rapidly away or even leaping out of the water.Fig. 4.


Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Underwater housing for laser pointer used for in-situ experiments. Laser was first modified by connecting a magnetic reed switch across leads of the push-button actuator. The housing was built from plumbing hardware, using a PVC union joint which had the pipe fitting opposite the O-ring removed and replaced with a clear acrylic disk. A neodymium magnet outside the tube can be rotated to activate the reed switch inside the tube.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582119&req=5

BIO012138F4: Underwater housing for laser pointer used for in-situ experiments. Laser was first modified by connecting a magnetic reed switch across leads of the push-button actuator. The housing was built from plumbing hardware, using a PVC union joint which had the pipe fitting opposite the O-ring removed and replaced with a clear acrylic disk. A neodymium magnet outside the tube can be rotated to activate the reed switch inside the tube.
Mentions: To observe the natural responses of fishes to illuminated dots, similar to the view of fluorescent tentacle tips, we constructed an underwater housing for a green laser pointer (Fig. 4), and tested it in several locations as well as in aquaria. During the day, use of the green laser underwater elicited aggressive responses from many fish living on and around coral reefs, especially in sandy patches (Fig. 5; supplementary material Movie 1). Fish made repeated strikes at the point where the laser shone on the substrate. At the Great Barrier Reef, Australia these responses were most pronounced among the benthic species, including blennies (Enchelyurus spp.), Chromis, lizardfish (Synodus jaculum), gleaners such as wrasses (e.g. the black-spot wrasse, blue-headed wrasse), and goatfish (Mullidae, e.g. Mulloidichthys sp,, Parupeneus sp.). Blennies showed territorial behavior and aggressively chased the spot only for a few centimeters, but wrasses and goatfish pursued the spot persistently for many minutes and across many meters. In Western Papua, many kinds of fish, including young damselfish (Pomacentrus sp.), triggerfish (Balistapus sp.), wrasses and snappers (Lutjanus biguttatus) showed interest and aggression at the dot, including following it across the bottom and biting at it. At night, when the beam was relatively much brighter in the darkness, fish avoided the green beam of light, often swimming rapidly away or even leaping out of the water.Fig. 4.

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus