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Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

LED spectra subset. (A) Excitation (blue) and emission (green) of the green fluorescent protein and absorbance spectrum of the pink chromoprotein in tentacle tips of O. formosus. (B) LED emission spectra for the three treatments used in the experiment. Blue LED excites the fluorescent protein with minimal overlap with the emission spectrum (dashed grey line). Yellow LED is longer wavelength than the excitation spectrum of the fluorescence. X-axis, wavelength in nm.
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BIO012138F2: LED spectra subset. (A) Excitation (blue) and emission (green) of the green fluorescent protein and absorbance spectrum of the pink chromoprotein in tentacle tips of O. formosus. (B) LED emission spectra for the three treatments used in the experiment. Blue LED excites the fluorescent protein with minimal overlap with the emission spectrum (dashed grey line). Yellow LED is longer wavelength than the excitation spectrum of the fluorescence. X-axis, wavelength in nm.

Mentions: The blue LED produced a maximum emission at 479 nm and the yellow LED at 566 nm (Fig. 2B). The blue LED emission overlapped with the excitation spectrum measured for O. formosus GFP (Fig. 2A), and thus was suitable to excite the green fluorescence of the tentacle tips. Blue light was also close to expected light field in the natural habitat of the medusa. The fluorescence emission of the tentacle tips was within the expected visual range of the Sebastes species we used as potential prey, and indeed most juvenile fishes have rods and cones sensitive to more than one wavelength extending beyond that range (Britt et al., 2001). In contrast, the yellow LED produced wavelengths longer than the excitation or emission spectrum of the fluorescent protein, and thus the medusa and its tentacles were only visible by their overall shape, with no distinct fluorescent features. The white LED produced two peaks, a sharp peak at 464 nm and a broader less intense peak at 548 nm (Fig. 2A). The short wavelengths of white light could potentially excite fluorescence, but it would not be conspicuous because the white LED also provided long-wavelength background illumination. Tentacle tips showed a peak fluorescent emission at 529 nm (Fig. 2B).Fig. 2.


Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

LED spectra subset. (A) Excitation (blue) and emission (green) of the green fluorescent protein and absorbance spectrum of the pink chromoprotein in tentacle tips of O. formosus. (B) LED emission spectra for the three treatments used in the experiment. Blue LED excites the fluorescent protein with minimal overlap with the emission spectrum (dashed grey line). Yellow LED is longer wavelength than the excitation spectrum of the fluorescence. X-axis, wavelength in nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582119&req=5

BIO012138F2: LED spectra subset. (A) Excitation (blue) and emission (green) of the green fluorescent protein and absorbance spectrum of the pink chromoprotein in tentacle tips of O. formosus. (B) LED emission spectra for the three treatments used in the experiment. Blue LED excites the fluorescent protein with minimal overlap with the emission spectrum (dashed grey line). Yellow LED is longer wavelength than the excitation spectrum of the fluorescence. X-axis, wavelength in nm.
Mentions: The blue LED produced a maximum emission at 479 nm and the yellow LED at 566 nm (Fig. 2B). The blue LED emission overlapped with the excitation spectrum measured for O. formosus GFP (Fig. 2A), and thus was suitable to excite the green fluorescence of the tentacle tips. Blue light was also close to expected light field in the natural habitat of the medusa. The fluorescence emission of the tentacle tips was within the expected visual range of the Sebastes species we used as potential prey, and indeed most juvenile fishes have rods and cones sensitive to more than one wavelength extending beyond that range (Britt et al., 2001). In contrast, the yellow LED produced wavelengths longer than the excitation or emission spectrum of the fluorescent protein, and thus the medusa and its tentacles were only visible by their overall shape, with no distinct fluorescent features. The white LED produced two peaks, a sharp peak at 464 nm and a broader less intense peak at 548 nm (Fig. 2A). The short wavelengths of white light could potentially excite fluorescence, but it would not be conspicuous because the white LED also provided long-wavelength background illumination. Tentacle tips showed a peak fluorescent emission at 529 nm (Fig. 2B).Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus