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Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fluorescence of Olindias. Photos of O. formosus in (A-C) white light and (D,E) under blue light, showing the fluorescence. Under white light (B) the fluorescence is excited, but is not distinct against the full-spectrum background illumination. (B,C) The tips of the tentacles have a pink chromoprotein which absorbs blue and green light, and thus appears dark in (D). Panel D is shown without a barrier filter, so the blue excitation has not been subtracted. Panel E shows the view with a long-pass filter so the blue-excitation is removed.
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BIO012138F1: Fluorescence of Olindias. Photos of O. formosus in (A-C) white light and (D,E) under blue light, showing the fluorescence. Under white light (B) the fluorescence is excited, but is not distinct against the full-spectrum background illumination. (B,C) The tips of the tentacles have a pink chromoprotein which absorbs blue and green light, and thus appears dark in (D). Panel D is shown without a barrier filter, so the blue excitation has not been subtracted. Panel E shows the view with a long-pass filter so the blue-excitation is removed.

Mentions: Among cnidarians, most of the animals which are known to have GFP either have algal symbionts (e.g. corals and anemones) or they are bioluminescent, including the well-studied species Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis (Prasher et al., 1992; Ward and Cormier, 1979). There are, however, many anthozoans and a few species of hydrozoans which have fluorescent structures without being bioluminescent (Matz et al., 1999). One such species is the limnomedusa Olindias formosus (Goto, 1903) (changed from O. formosa due to a gender mismatch between genus and species), which is found in shallow waters (<30 m deep) off the coast of Japan. It has a unique morphology wherein the tentacles grow up along the outside of bell, and terminate in green fluorescent and pink pigmented segments (Fig. 1). The life cycle of O. formosus was recently studied, and it was found that fluorescence is present even during early development of the polyp stage (Patry et al., 2014).Fig. 1.


Fluorescent proteins function as a prey attractant: experimental evidence from the hydromedusa Olindias formosus and other marine organisms.

Haddock SH, Dunn CW - Biol Open (2015)

Fluorescence of Olindias. Photos of O. formosus in (A-C) white light and (D,E) under blue light, showing the fluorescence. Under white light (B) the fluorescence is excited, but is not distinct against the full-spectrum background illumination. (B,C) The tips of the tentacles have a pink chromoprotein which absorbs blue and green light, and thus appears dark in (D). Panel D is shown without a barrier filter, so the blue excitation has not been subtracted. Panel E shows the view with a long-pass filter so the blue-excitation is removed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582119&req=5

BIO012138F1: Fluorescence of Olindias. Photos of O. formosus in (A-C) white light and (D,E) under blue light, showing the fluorescence. Under white light (B) the fluorescence is excited, but is not distinct against the full-spectrum background illumination. (B,C) The tips of the tentacles have a pink chromoprotein which absorbs blue and green light, and thus appears dark in (D). Panel D is shown without a barrier filter, so the blue excitation has not been subtracted. Panel E shows the view with a long-pass filter so the blue-excitation is removed.
Mentions: Among cnidarians, most of the animals which are known to have GFP either have algal symbionts (e.g. corals and anemones) or they are bioluminescent, including the well-studied species Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis (Prasher et al., 1992; Ward and Cormier, 1979). There are, however, many anthozoans and a few species of hydrozoans which have fluorescent structures without being bioluminescent (Matz et al., 1999). One such species is the limnomedusa Olindias formosus (Goto, 1903) (changed from O. formosa due to a gender mismatch between genus and species), which is found in shallow waters (<30 m deep) off the coast of Japan. It has a unique morphology wherein the tentacles grow up along the outside of bell, and terminate in green fluorescent and pink pigmented segments (Fig. 1). The life cycle of O. formosus was recently studied, and it was found that fluorescence is present even during early development of the polyp stage (Patry et al., 2014).Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: The fish did not respond significantly when treatments did not include fluorescent structures or took place under yellow or white lights, which did not generate fluorescence visible above the ambient light.In situ observations also provided evidence for fluorescent lures as supernormal stimuli in several other marine animals, including the siphonophore Rhizophysa eysenhardti.Our results support the idea that fluorescent structures can serve as prey attractants, thus providing a potential function for GFPs and other fluorescent proteins in a diverse range of organisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9644, USA haddock@mbari.org.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus