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Enhancer of zeste acts as a major developmental regulator of Ciona intestinalis embryogenesis.

Le Goff E, Martinand-Mari C, Martin M, Feuillard J, Boublik Y, Godefroy N, Mangeat P, Baghdiguian S, Cavalli G - Biol Open (2015)

Bottom Line: These major phenotypic defects are specifically rescued by injection of a morpholino-resistant Ci-E(z) mRNA, which restores expression of Ci-E(z) protein and re-deposition of the H3K27me3 mark.As observed by qPCR analyses, Ci-E(z) invalidation leads to the early derepression of tissue-specific developmental genes, whereas late-acting developmental genes are generally down-regulated.Altogether, our results suggest that Ci-E(z) plays a major role during embryonic development in Ciona intestinalis by silencing early-acting developmental genes in a Hox-independent manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, Montpellier 34095, Cedex 5, France Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution (ISEM), UMR5554, CNRS, Montpellier 34095, France.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Localization of Ci-E(z) protein in control embryos and Ci-E(z) morphants. Ci-E(z) protein, actin (Phalloïdin, green) and DNA (DAPI, blue) were localized by triple labeling in Ciona intestinalis embryos at different stages of development by confocal microscopy. At the right of each merge (actin/DNA) the corresponding Ci-E(z) image is shown with the cell contours drawn in grey. For the 64-cell and neurula wild-type stages, the Ci-E(z) images correspond to a stacked image of all z planes. Each point of kinetic was repeated between 4 and 10 times. For each kinetic point, between 20 and 40 embryos were collected. Scale bar: 25 µm.
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BIO010835F2: Localization of Ci-E(z) protein in control embryos and Ci-E(z) morphants. Ci-E(z) protein, actin (Phalloïdin, green) and DNA (DAPI, blue) were localized by triple labeling in Ciona intestinalis embryos at different stages of development by confocal microscopy. At the right of each merge (actin/DNA) the corresponding Ci-E(z) image is shown with the cell contours drawn in grey. For the 64-cell and neurula wild-type stages, the Ci-E(z) images correspond to a stacked image of all z planes. Each point of kinetic was repeated between 4 and 10 times. For each kinetic point, between 20 and 40 embryos were collected. Scale bar: 25 µm.

Mentions: The expression and cellular localization of Ci-E(z) protein during embryonic development of Ciona intestinalis was next characterized in control and Ci-E(z) morphants (Fig. 2). In control morphants, Ci-E(z) protein was detected as early as the 2-cell stage and throughout all stages of larva embryogenesis (Fig. 2, left panels and data not shown). At the 2- and 4-cell stages, E(z) protein was predominantly detected in the cytoplasm of all blastomeres. In contrast, in the further developmental stages, E(z) was only detected in the nucleus, with all blastomeres being labeled until the 64-cell stage (except when cells underwent mitosis, which induced loss of chromosomal Ci-E(z) staining). At neurula stage, the labeling was detected in the majority of cells from the future posterior part of larva. In the subsequent stage of development (initial tailbud), Ci-E(z) protein expression was mainly muscle and epidermis specific and, at middle tailbud stage, the fluorescence intensity became maximal with Ci-E(z) being detected in all embryonic cells. In late tailbud, when the notochord development is achieved, all tail cells were Ci-E(z) positive (supplementary material Fig. S1). At hatching, a new differential expression of Ci-E(z) was observed. Cells of the newly formed adhesive papillae were Ci-E(z)-positive, as well as some epidermal and endodermal head cells. In the tail, positive cells were specifically located in the extremity including epidermis, muscle and notochord cells (supplementary material Fig. S1).Fig. 2.


Enhancer of zeste acts as a major developmental regulator of Ciona intestinalis embryogenesis.

Le Goff E, Martinand-Mari C, Martin M, Feuillard J, Boublik Y, Godefroy N, Mangeat P, Baghdiguian S, Cavalli G - Biol Open (2015)

Localization of Ci-E(z) protein in control embryos and Ci-E(z) morphants. Ci-E(z) protein, actin (Phalloïdin, green) and DNA (DAPI, blue) were localized by triple labeling in Ciona intestinalis embryos at different stages of development by confocal microscopy. At the right of each merge (actin/DNA) the corresponding Ci-E(z) image is shown with the cell contours drawn in grey. For the 64-cell and neurula wild-type stages, the Ci-E(z) images correspond to a stacked image of all z planes. Each point of kinetic was repeated between 4 and 10 times. For each kinetic point, between 20 and 40 embryos were collected. Scale bar: 25 µm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582116&req=5

BIO010835F2: Localization of Ci-E(z) protein in control embryos and Ci-E(z) morphants. Ci-E(z) protein, actin (Phalloïdin, green) and DNA (DAPI, blue) were localized by triple labeling in Ciona intestinalis embryos at different stages of development by confocal microscopy. At the right of each merge (actin/DNA) the corresponding Ci-E(z) image is shown with the cell contours drawn in grey. For the 64-cell and neurula wild-type stages, the Ci-E(z) images correspond to a stacked image of all z planes. Each point of kinetic was repeated between 4 and 10 times. For each kinetic point, between 20 and 40 embryos were collected. Scale bar: 25 µm.
Mentions: The expression and cellular localization of Ci-E(z) protein during embryonic development of Ciona intestinalis was next characterized in control and Ci-E(z) morphants (Fig. 2). In control morphants, Ci-E(z) protein was detected as early as the 2-cell stage and throughout all stages of larva embryogenesis (Fig. 2, left panels and data not shown). At the 2- and 4-cell stages, E(z) protein was predominantly detected in the cytoplasm of all blastomeres. In contrast, in the further developmental stages, E(z) was only detected in the nucleus, with all blastomeres being labeled until the 64-cell stage (except when cells underwent mitosis, which induced loss of chromosomal Ci-E(z) staining). At neurula stage, the labeling was detected in the majority of cells from the future posterior part of larva. In the subsequent stage of development (initial tailbud), Ci-E(z) protein expression was mainly muscle and epidermis specific and, at middle tailbud stage, the fluorescence intensity became maximal with Ci-E(z) being detected in all embryonic cells. In late tailbud, when the notochord development is achieved, all tail cells were Ci-E(z) positive (supplementary material Fig. S1). At hatching, a new differential expression of Ci-E(z) was observed. Cells of the newly formed adhesive papillae were Ci-E(z)-positive, as well as some epidermal and endodermal head cells. In the tail, positive cells were specifically located in the extremity including epidermis, muscle and notochord cells (supplementary material Fig. S1).Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: These major phenotypic defects are specifically rescued by injection of a morpholino-resistant Ci-E(z) mRNA, which restores expression of Ci-E(z) protein and re-deposition of the H3K27me3 mark.As observed by qPCR analyses, Ci-E(z) invalidation leads to the early derepression of tissue-specific developmental genes, whereas late-acting developmental genes are generally down-regulated.Altogether, our results suggest that Ci-E(z) plays a major role during embryonic development in Ciona intestinalis by silencing early-acting developmental genes in a Hox-independent manner.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Université Montpellier, Place Eugène Bataillon, Montpellier 34095, Cedex 5, France Institut des Sciences de l'Evolution (ISEM), UMR5554, CNRS, Montpellier 34095, France.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus