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Structural and functional hepatocyte polarity and liver disease.

Gissen P, Arias IM - J. Hepatol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Hepatocyte depolarization frequently occurs but is rarely recognized because hematoxylin-eosin staining does not identify the bile canaliculus.However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not well understood.Here we aim to provide an update on the key factors determining hepatocyte polarity and how it is affected in inherited and acquired diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, University College London, London, UK; UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK; Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: p.gissen@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Progressive canalicular network formation in sandwich cultures of rat primary hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence of the tight junction marker occludin (green) and the apical marker ABCB1 (red). Diagram of canalicular network formation. Mean canalicular length (±SD) from three individual experiments (n, cell number) (adapted from Fu et al. J Cell Sci, 2010) [6].
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f0010: Progressive canalicular network formation in sandwich cultures of rat primary hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence of the tight junction marker occludin (green) and the apical marker ABCB1 (red). Diagram of canalicular network formation. Mean canalicular length (±SD) from three individual experiments (n, cell number) (adapted from Fu et al. J Cell Sci, 2010) [6].

Mentions: Although most basic studies of components and mechanisms of polarity were identified in polarized cell lines, such as MDCK, WIF-B and HepG2; corroborating investigations in mammalian hepatocytes generally support similar mechanisms. Cell lines and primary hepatocyte cultures have significant limitations for polarization studies; however, collagen sandwich cultures of mammalian hepatocytes have proven useful because they are non-dividing, do not undergo autophagy, have stable gene expression for about two weeks and, most importantly, sequentially form a canalicular network similar to that seen in vivo (Fig. 2) [6,10].


Structural and functional hepatocyte polarity and liver disease.

Gissen P, Arias IM - J. Hepatol. (2015)

Progressive canalicular network formation in sandwich cultures of rat primary hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence of the tight junction marker occludin (green) and the apical marker ABCB1 (red). Diagram of canalicular network formation. Mean canalicular length (±SD) from three individual experiments (n, cell number) (adapted from Fu et al. J Cell Sci, 2010) [6].
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582071&req=5

f0010: Progressive canalicular network formation in sandwich cultures of rat primary hepatocytes. Immunofluorescence of the tight junction marker occludin (green) and the apical marker ABCB1 (red). Diagram of canalicular network formation. Mean canalicular length (±SD) from three individual experiments (n, cell number) (adapted from Fu et al. J Cell Sci, 2010) [6].
Mentions: Although most basic studies of components and mechanisms of polarity were identified in polarized cell lines, such as MDCK, WIF-B and HepG2; corroborating investigations in mammalian hepatocytes generally support similar mechanisms. Cell lines and primary hepatocyte cultures have significant limitations for polarization studies; however, collagen sandwich cultures of mammalian hepatocytes have proven useful because they are non-dividing, do not undergo autophagy, have stable gene expression for about two weeks and, most importantly, sequentially form a canalicular network similar to that seen in vivo (Fig. 2) [6,10].

Bottom Line: Hepatocyte depolarization frequently occurs but is rarely recognized because hematoxylin-eosin staining does not identify the bile canaliculus.However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not well understood.Here we aim to provide an update on the key factors determining hepatocyte polarity and how it is affected in inherited and acquired diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, University College London, London, UK; UCL Institute of Child Health, London, UK; Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK. Electronic address: p.gissen@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus