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Atypical processing of voice sounds in infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder.

Blasi A, Lloyd-Fox S, Sethna V, Brammer MJ, Mercure E, Murray L, Williams SC, Simmons A, Murphy DG, Johnson MH - Cortex (2015)

Bottom Line: Whereas LR infants showed early specialisation for human voice processing in right temporal and medial frontal regions, the HR infants did not.These results suggest that at least some infants at high-risk for ASD have atypical neural responses to human voice with and without emotional valence.Further exploration of the relationship between behaviour during social interaction and voice processing may help better understand the mechanisms that lead to different outcomes in at risk populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Birkbeck, University of London, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, UK; King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Sackler Institute of Translational Neurodevelopment, Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, UK. Electronic address: a.blasiribera@bbk.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between behaviour in the context of mother‚Äďinfant interaction and fMRI activation. Representation of the interaction between the infant behavioural measure Active-Engagement and group status on the voice sensitivity contrast in clusters (a) 32 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 9); (b) 37 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 6); and (c) 39 (right medial frontal gyrus, BA 6). Pearson correlation coefficients between Infant Active-Engagement and fMRI activation were calculated within group at each cluster; * and ** indicate significant Pearson correlation (2-tailed, at p¬†<¬†.05 level and p¬†<¬†.01 level, respectively).
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fig3: Association between behaviour in the context of mother‚Äďinfant interaction and fMRI activation. Representation of the interaction between the infant behavioural measure Active-Engagement and group status on the voice sensitivity contrast in clusters (a) 32 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 9); (b) 37 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 6); and (c) 39 (right medial frontal gyrus, BA 6). Pearson correlation coefficients between Infant Active-Engagement and fMRI activation were calculated within group at each cluster; * and ** indicate significant Pearson correlation (2-tailed, at p¬†<¬†.05 level and p¬†<¬†.01 level, respectively).

Mentions: For the contrast neutral voice¬†>¬†non voice, there were significant interactions between maternal and infant behaviours with risk status to predict infant processing of vocal sounds in a number of brain regions. Maternal intrusiveness¬†√ó¬†risk status predicted activation in the left middle temporal gyrus (cluster 16, BA 21), whereas infant behaviours (attentiveness, fretfulness and active-engagement) interacted with risk status to predict activation in the medial frontal gyrus (clusters 32, 37 and 39, as summarised in Table 2). However, the only effect that survived FDR correction for multiple comparisons was infant active-engagement¬†√ó¬†risk status in cluster 32 (voice selectivity contrast), in the right medial frontal gyrus (BA 9). Similar trends in the interaction between infant active-engagement and risk status were observed in the other two clusters in the medial frontal gyrus (as shown in Fig.¬†3). In these three clusters, infants in the HR group show negative correlation between active-engagement and voice selectivity: in cluster 32, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.719, p¬†=¬†.006 (2-tailed); in cluster 37, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.405, p¬†=¬†.170 (2-tailed); and in cluster 39, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.555, p¬†=¬†.049 (2-tailed). By contrast, infants in the LR group do not show any correlation between active-engagement and voice selectivity: in cluster 32, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†.131, p¬†=¬†.603 (2-tailed); in cluster 37, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†.360, p¬†=¬†.142 (2-tailed); and in cluster 39, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.177, p¬†=¬†.484 (2-tailed). Therefore, infants in the HR group with higher interaction scores on the active-engagement dimension (characterised by high levels of engagement, attentiveness and activity) tend to show weaker activation to voice sounds compared to non voice sounds; whereas, LR infants show a clear preference for vocal sounds, irrespective of infant behaviour (Fig.¬†3). There were no significant differences in measures of active-engagement between the two groups (LR, mean¬†=¬†3.64, SD¬†=¬†.76; HR, mean¬†=¬†3.60, SD¬†=¬†.77; comparison of means, t¬†=¬†.171, p¬†=¬†.865), and variance of this measure was also similar in the two groups [F(17,12)¬†=¬†2.394, p¬†=¬†.935].


Atypical processing of voice sounds in infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder.

Blasi A, Lloyd-Fox S, Sethna V, Brammer MJ, Mercure E, Murray L, Williams SC, Simmons A, Murphy DG, Johnson MH - Cortex (2015)

Association between behaviour in the context of mother‚Äďinfant interaction and fMRI activation. Representation of the interaction between the infant behavioural measure Active-Engagement and group status on the voice sensitivity contrast in clusters (a) 32 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 9); (b) 37 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 6); and (c) 39 (right medial frontal gyrus, BA 6). Pearson correlation coefficients between Infant Active-Engagement and fMRI activation were calculated within group at each cluster; * and ** indicate significant Pearson correlation (2-tailed, at p¬†<¬†.05 level and p¬†<¬†.01 level, respectively).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582069&req=5

fig3: Association between behaviour in the context of mother‚Äďinfant interaction and fMRI activation. Representation of the interaction between the infant behavioural measure Active-Engagement and group status on the voice sensitivity contrast in clusters (a) 32 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 9); (b) 37 (left medial frontal gyrus, BA 6); and (c) 39 (right medial frontal gyrus, BA 6). Pearson correlation coefficients between Infant Active-Engagement and fMRI activation were calculated within group at each cluster; * and ** indicate significant Pearson correlation (2-tailed, at p¬†<¬†.05 level and p¬†<¬†.01 level, respectively).
Mentions: For the contrast neutral voice¬†>¬†non voice, there were significant interactions between maternal and infant behaviours with risk status to predict infant processing of vocal sounds in a number of brain regions. Maternal intrusiveness¬†√ó¬†risk status predicted activation in the left middle temporal gyrus (cluster 16, BA 21), whereas infant behaviours (attentiveness, fretfulness and active-engagement) interacted with risk status to predict activation in the medial frontal gyrus (clusters 32, 37 and 39, as summarised in Table 2). However, the only effect that survived FDR correction for multiple comparisons was infant active-engagement¬†√ó¬†risk status in cluster 32 (voice selectivity contrast), in the right medial frontal gyrus (BA 9). Similar trends in the interaction between infant active-engagement and risk status were observed in the other two clusters in the medial frontal gyrus (as shown in Fig.¬†3). In these three clusters, infants in the HR group show negative correlation between active-engagement and voice selectivity: in cluster 32, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.719, p¬†=¬†.006 (2-tailed); in cluster 37, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.405, p¬†=¬†.170 (2-tailed); and in cluster 39, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.555, p¬†=¬†.049 (2-tailed). By contrast, infants in the LR group do not show any correlation between active-engagement and voice selectivity: in cluster 32, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†.131, p¬†=¬†.603 (2-tailed); in cluster 37, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†.360, p¬†=¬†.142 (2-tailed); and in cluster 39, Pearson correlation¬†=¬†‚ąí.177, p¬†=¬†.484 (2-tailed). Therefore, infants in the HR group with higher interaction scores on the active-engagement dimension (characterised by high levels of engagement, attentiveness and activity) tend to show weaker activation to voice sounds compared to non voice sounds; whereas, LR infants show a clear preference for vocal sounds, irrespective of infant behaviour (Fig.¬†3). There were no significant differences in measures of active-engagement between the two groups (LR, mean¬†=¬†3.64, SD¬†=¬†.76; HR, mean¬†=¬†3.60, SD¬†=¬†.77; comparison of means, t¬†=¬†.171, p¬†=¬†.865), and variance of this measure was also similar in the two groups [F(17,12)¬†=¬†2.394, p¬†=¬†.935].

Bottom Line: Whereas LR infants showed early specialisation for human voice processing in right temporal and medial frontal regions, the HR infants did not.These results suggest that at least some infants at high-risk for ASD have atypical neural responses to human voice with and without emotional valence.Further exploration of the relationship between behaviour during social interaction and voice processing may help better understand the mechanisms that lead to different outcomes in at risk populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Birkbeck, University of London, Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, UK; King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, Sackler Institute of Translational Neurodevelopment, Department of Forensic and Neurodevelopmental Science, UK. Electronic address: a.blasiribera@bbk.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus