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Hearing in Drosophila.

Albert JT, Göpfert MC - Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent studies have analyzed the operation of auditory sensory cells and the processing of sound in the fly's brain.Neuronal responses to sound have been characterized, and novel classes of auditory neurons have been defined; transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were implicated in auditory transduction, and genetic and environmental causes of auditory dysfunctions have been identified.This review discusses the implications of these recent advances on our understanding of how hearing happens in the fly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ear Institute, University College London, 332 Gray's Inn Rd, London WC1X 8EE, UK. Electronic address: joerg.albert@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Drosophila hearing organ and direction sensitivities of JONs. (a) Frontal view of the Drosophila antenna. When acoustically stimulated, the arista and the funiculus sympathetically vibrate about the longitudinal axis, thereby activating JONs in the pedicel of the antenna. (b) Cross-sections through the pedicel-funiculus joint (top: overviews, bottom: zoom-ins), depicting the funicular connection sites of JONs. Deflecting the antenna posteriorly stretch-activates (depolarizes) deflection-sensitive JONs that connect to the posterior side of the funiculus (left) but inactivates (hyperpolarizes) JONs connecting to its anterior side. For posterior deflections of the antenna, the signs of activation are inversed. Auditory JONs might be equally activated by anterior and posterior antennal movements; judging from their somata positions, they might connect medially to the funiculus with their terminal threads.
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fig0005: Drosophila hearing organ and direction sensitivities of JONs. (a) Frontal view of the Drosophila antenna. When acoustically stimulated, the arista and the funiculus sympathetically vibrate about the longitudinal axis, thereby activating JONs in the pedicel of the antenna. (b) Cross-sections through the pedicel-funiculus joint (top: overviews, bottom: zoom-ins), depicting the funicular connection sites of JONs. Deflecting the antenna posteriorly stretch-activates (depolarizes) deflection-sensitive JONs that connect to the posterior side of the funiculus (left) but inactivates (hyperpolarizes) JONs connecting to its anterior side. For posterior deflections of the antenna, the signs of activation are inversed. Auditory JONs might be equally activated by anterior and posterior antennal movements; judging from their somata positions, they might connect medially to the funiculus with their terminal threads.

Mentions: Hearing in Drosophila melanogaster serves the detection of the courtship songs male flies produce by fanning one of their wings [1]. These close-range songs, the spectral composition of which matches the flies’ range of hearing (ca. 100–300 Hz), drive female mating decisions [2] and stimulate other males to court and sing [1,3]. Both sexes detect sounds with Johnston's organ (JO) (Figure 1) — an array of ca. 500 chordotonal stretch-receptor neurons (JONs) in the pedicel of the fly's antenna [4,5] (Figure 1a). It is currently not known if there are any sexual dimorphisms in JO. Each JON bears a single ciliated dendrite, which transduces stimulus-induced antennal displacements into electrical currents [6], and an axon that propagates the resulting action potentials to the antennal mechanosensory motor center (AMMC) in the deuterocerebrum of the fly's brain [7••] (Figures 2b and 3). This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of JON function and the central auditory circuitry downstream of JONs.


Hearing in Drosophila.

Albert JT, Göpfert MC - Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. (2015)

Drosophila hearing organ and direction sensitivities of JONs. (a) Frontal view of the Drosophila antenna. When acoustically stimulated, the arista and the funiculus sympathetically vibrate about the longitudinal axis, thereby activating JONs in the pedicel of the antenna. (b) Cross-sections through the pedicel-funiculus joint (top: overviews, bottom: zoom-ins), depicting the funicular connection sites of JONs. Deflecting the antenna posteriorly stretch-activates (depolarizes) deflection-sensitive JONs that connect to the posterior side of the funiculus (left) but inactivates (hyperpolarizes) JONs connecting to its anterior side. For posterior deflections of the antenna, the signs of activation are inversed. Auditory JONs might be equally activated by anterior and posterior antennal movements; judging from their somata positions, they might connect medially to the funiculus with their terminal threads.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582067&req=5

fig0005: Drosophila hearing organ and direction sensitivities of JONs. (a) Frontal view of the Drosophila antenna. When acoustically stimulated, the arista and the funiculus sympathetically vibrate about the longitudinal axis, thereby activating JONs in the pedicel of the antenna. (b) Cross-sections through the pedicel-funiculus joint (top: overviews, bottom: zoom-ins), depicting the funicular connection sites of JONs. Deflecting the antenna posteriorly stretch-activates (depolarizes) deflection-sensitive JONs that connect to the posterior side of the funiculus (left) but inactivates (hyperpolarizes) JONs connecting to its anterior side. For posterior deflections of the antenna, the signs of activation are inversed. Auditory JONs might be equally activated by anterior and posterior antennal movements; judging from their somata positions, they might connect medially to the funiculus with their terminal threads.
Mentions: Hearing in Drosophila melanogaster serves the detection of the courtship songs male flies produce by fanning one of their wings [1]. These close-range songs, the spectral composition of which matches the flies’ range of hearing (ca. 100–300 Hz), drive female mating decisions [2] and stimulate other males to court and sing [1,3]. Both sexes detect sounds with Johnston's organ (JO) (Figure 1) — an array of ca. 500 chordotonal stretch-receptor neurons (JONs) in the pedicel of the fly's antenna [4,5] (Figure 1a). It is currently not known if there are any sexual dimorphisms in JO. Each JON bears a single ciliated dendrite, which transduces stimulus-induced antennal displacements into electrical currents [6], and an axon that propagates the resulting action potentials to the antennal mechanosensory motor center (AMMC) in the deuterocerebrum of the fly's brain [7••] (Figures 2b and 3). This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of JON function and the central auditory circuitry downstream of JONs.

Bottom Line: Recent studies have analyzed the operation of auditory sensory cells and the processing of sound in the fly's brain.Neuronal responses to sound have been characterized, and novel classes of auditory neurons have been defined; transient receptor potential (TRP) channels were implicated in auditory transduction, and genetic and environmental causes of auditory dysfunctions have been identified.This review discusses the implications of these recent advances on our understanding of how hearing happens in the fly.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ear Institute, University College London, 332 Gray's Inn Rd, London WC1X 8EE, UK. Electronic address: joerg.albert@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus