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Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices.

Moraru D, Samanta A, Tyszka K, Anh le T, Muruganathan M, Mizuno T, Jablonski R, Mizuta H, Tabe M - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics.We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths.This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan. moraru.daniel@shizuoka.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of key factors toward high-temperature tunneling operation. Research directions and critical factors for conduction modes of SETs (with lithographically defined dots) and dopant-atom transistors. The diagram is displayed as a function of number of dots or dopants involved in transport (vertical axis) and temperature in low, medium, high range, i.e., LT, MT, HT (horizontal axis). Relevant references for each conduction mode are also indicated in the diagram
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Fig7: Overview of key factors toward high-temperature tunneling operation. Research directions and critical factors for conduction modes of SETs (with lithographically defined dots) and dopant-atom transistors. The diagram is displayed as a function of number of dots or dopants involved in transport (vertical axis) and temperature in low, medium, high range, i.e., LT, MT, HT (horizontal axis). Relevant references for each conduction mode are also indicated in the diagram

Mentions: FigureĀ 7 provides an overview of the factors critical for tunneling operation in different temperature ranges (horizontal axis) and as a function of the number of dopants forming the QD or number of QDs involved in transport (vertical axis). Coulomb blockade (CB) is the ideal transport mechanism in which the current is purely given by single-electron tunneling via the dopant-QD (or lithographically defined QD) [11-18, 31, 40-45], without interference due to thermally activated conduction (TAC) component [42]. As temperature is increased, the conduction mechanism changes to TAC and the thermally activated component of the current rapidly masks the CB component. For special cases of a small number of dopants (or QDs) in series, Hubbard band conduction (HBC) [46, 47] may also become a significant current component and it should be treated in conjunction with the CB mechanism. At low temperatures, HBC mechanism has been well studied in previous works [48]. When the number of dopants becomes very large, we can refer to other types of devices such as junctionless transistors [49] and their temperature evolution [50]. Relevant references are indicated in the diagram as well for further details. It should be noted, however, that at present, there is a missing area of experimental results, represented in the diagram as atomistic tunneling at high temperature (HT). This is of critical importance for advanced electronics applications, and it should be directly addressed as a target of future studies, building upon the accumulated knowledge, as illustrated in this diagram. It should not be assumed, however, that this diagram offers an exhaustive overview of all possible factors involved in the tunneling mechanism at high temperatures.Fig. 7


Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices.

Moraru D, Samanta A, Tyszka K, Anh le T, Muruganathan M, Mizuno T, Jablonski R, Mizuta H, Tabe M - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Overview of key factors toward high-temperature tunneling operation. Research directions and critical factors for conduction modes of SETs (with lithographically defined dots) and dopant-atom transistors. The diagram is displayed as a function of number of dots or dopants involved in transport (vertical axis) and temperature in low, medium, high range, i.e., LT, MT, HT (horizontal axis). Relevant references for each conduction mode are also indicated in the diagram
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582038&req=5

Fig7: Overview of key factors toward high-temperature tunneling operation. Research directions and critical factors for conduction modes of SETs (with lithographically defined dots) and dopant-atom transistors. The diagram is displayed as a function of number of dots or dopants involved in transport (vertical axis) and temperature in low, medium, high range, i.e., LT, MT, HT (horizontal axis). Relevant references for each conduction mode are also indicated in the diagram
Mentions: FigureĀ 7 provides an overview of the factors critical for tunneling operation in different temperature ranges (horizontal axis) and as a function of the number of dopants forming the QD or number of QDs involved in transport (vertical axis). Coulomb blockade (CB) is the ideal transport mechanism in which the current is purely given by single-electron tunneling via the dopant-QD (or lithographically defined QD) [11-18, 31, 40-45], without interference due to thermally activated conduction (TAC) component [42]. As temperature is increased, the conduction mechanism changes to TAC and the thermally activated component of the current rapidly masks the CB component. For special cases of a small number of dopants (or QDs) in series, Hubbard band conduction (HBC) [46, 47] may also become a significant current component and it should be treated in conjunction with the CB mechanism. At low temperatures, HBC mechanism has been well studied in previous works [48]. When the number of dopants becomes very large, we can refer to other types of devices such as junctionless transistors [49] and their temperature evolution [50]. Relevant references are indicated in the diagram as well for further details. It should be noted, however, that at present, there is a missing area of experimental results, represented in the diagram as atomistic tunneling at high temperature (HT). This is of critical importance for advanced electronics applications, and it should be directly addressed as a target of future studies, building upon the accumulated knowledge, as illustrated in this diagram. It should not be assumed, however, that this diagram offers an exhaustive overview of all possible factors involved in the tunneling mechanism at high temperatures.Fig. 7

Bottom Line: One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics.We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths.This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan. moraru.daniel@shizuoka.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus