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Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices.

Moraru D, Samanta A, Tyszka K, Anh le T, Muruganathan M, Mizuno T, Jablonski R, Mizuta H, Tabe M - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics.We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths.This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan. moraru.daniel@shizuoka.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

No MeSH data available.


Electron injection in individual donor atoms observed by KPFM. a Sequence of electronic potential landscapes measured at low temperature (T = 13 K) on the channel of an SOI-FET doped with P-donors (ND ≈ 1 × 1018 cm−3) as a function of applied VBG (−3 ~ 0 V). b A simple illustration of one-by-one neutralization of individual P-donors at different VBGs [23]
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Fig2: Electron injection in individual donor atoms observed by KPFM. a Sequence of electronic potential landscapes measured at low temperature (T = 13 K) on the channel of an SOI-FET doped with P-donors (ND ≈ 1 × 1018 cm−3) as a function of applied VBG (−3 ~ 0 V). b A simple illustration of one-by-one neutralization of individual P-donors at different VBGs [23]

Mentions: Figure 2a shows a sequence of KPFM measurements at low temperature (T = 13 K) on an area within the channel of an SOI-FET for which an appropriate arrangement of P-donors was actually identified [23]. In particular, isolated P-donor-induced potential wells can be clearly observed for most negative VBG (−3 V). Interestingly, if VBG is increased in the positive direction, the potential wells vanish one by one at successive values of VBG, with no significant features remaining at VBG = 0 V. As illustrated in the schematic model (Fig. 2b), this can be interpreted as successive captures of single electrons in individual P-donors. In such a simplified interpretation, this picture is consistent with the concept that individual P-donors work as distinct QDs in single-electron tunneling transport. This concept is at the core of the operation principle for single-dopant transistors, and our direct observation provides thus a straightforward visualization of such fundamental events.Fig. 2


Tunneling in Systems of Coupled Dopant-Atoms in Silicon Nano-devices.

Moraru D, Samanta A, Tyszka K, Anh le T, Muruganathan M, Mizuno T, Jablonski R, Mizuta H, Tabe M - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Electron injection in individual donor atoms observed by KPFM. a Sequence of electronic potential landscapes measured at low temperature (T = 13 K) on the channel of an SOI-FET doped with P-donors (ND ≈ 1 × 1018 cm−3) as a function of applied VBG (−3 ~ 0 V). b A simple illustration of one-by-one neutralization of individual P-donors at different VBGs [23]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582038&req=5

Fig2: Electron injection in individual donor atoms observed by KPFM. a Sequence of electronic potential landscapes measured at low temperature (T = 13 K) on the channel of an SOI-FET doped with P-donors (ND ≈ 1 × 1018 cm−3) as a function of applied VBG (−3 ~ 0 V). b A simple illustration of one-by-one neutralization of individual P-donors at different VBGs [23]
Mentions: Figure 2a shows a sequence of KPFM measurements at low temperature (T = 13 K) on an area within the channel of an SOI-FET for which an appropriate arrangement of P-donors was actually identified [23]. In particular, isolated P-donor-induced potential wells can be clearly observed for most negative VBG (−3 V). Interestingly, if VBG is increased in the positive direction, the potential wells vanish one by one at successive values of VBG, with no significant features remaining at VBG = 0 V. As illustrated in the schematic model (Fig. 2b), this can be interpreted as successive captures of single electrons in individual P-donors. In such a simplified interpretation, this picture is consistent with the concept that individual P-donors work as distinct QDs in single-electron tunneling transport. This concept is at the core of the operation principle for single-dopant transistors, and our direct observation provides thus a straightforward visualization of such fundamental events.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics.We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths.This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electronics and Materials Science, Faculty of Engineering, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka, Japan. moraru.daniel@shizuoka.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Following the rapid development of the electronics industry and technology, it is expected that future electronic devices will operate based on functional units at the level of electrically active molecules or even atoms. One pathway to observe and characterize such fundamental operation is to focus on identifying isolated or coupled dopants in nanoscale silicon transistors, the building blocks of present electronics. Here, we review some of the recent progress in the research along this direction, with a focus on devices fabricated with simple and CMOS-compatible-processing technology. We present results from a scanning probe method (Kelvin probe force microscopy) which show direct observation of dopant-induced potential modulations. We also discuss tunneling transport behavior based on the analysis of low-temperature I-V characteristics for devices representative for different regimes of doping concentration, i.e., different inter-dopant coupling strengths. This overview outlines the present status of the field, opening also directions toward practical implementation of dopant-atom devices.

No MeSH data available.