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Secure land tenure as prerequisite towards sustainable living: a case study of native communities in Mantob village, Sabah, Malaysia.

Lunkapis GJ - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: A combination of quantitative and qualitative method is used to understand the dynamics of the strategy used by the native communities to adapt to these policy changes.The findings reveal how the natives have employed an adaptive strategy in response to state policy changes.The lessons learned from this study can provide useful pointers as to how state policies, in relation to highland settlements in the state of Sabah, Malaysia, can be improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Heritage, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Sustainable livelihoods, once enjoyed by native communities, are often threatened and in danger of extinction when new regulations and other forms of restrictions are introduced. These restrictions are often promoted with intended purposes, such as protecting the environment or securing resources from encroachment. However, these acts are slowly replacing the traditional adat (customs and traditions), which are used to define the rights attached to the use of communal and ancestral land. This is especially true when comes to access to forest products and land, in which native communities have used for generations. What the natives see as legitimate and traditional use, the state sees as an encroachment of property; and it has now become illegal to utilise these resources. This paper presents how native communities have adapted to such restrictions and continued to live in a sustainable manner through an adaptive strategy that is in line with state policy changes. A combination of quantitative and qualitative method is used to understand the dynamics of the strategy used by the native communities to adapt to these policy changes. The findings reveal how the natives have employed an adaptive strategy in response to state policy changes. The lessons learned from this study can provide useful pointers as to how state policies, in relation to highland settlements in the state of Sabah, Malaysia, can be improved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mantob Village, the water protection zone and the Crocker Range Park
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Fig1: Mantob Village, the water protection zone and the Crocker Range Park

Mentions: Sabah is located on the Northern Tip of Borneo, the third largest island in the world and host of the first popular television series, the Survivor (Fig. 1). Borneo’s people are a mosaic of culturally distinct native groups scattered across the highland and known for their strong interdependence with natural resources. These native peoples gained access to natural resources through kinship, local customs and through international conventions (Doolittle 2005), but different interpretations of the ways in which this access is gained may give rise to complications. There will definitely be some sort of ambiguity with regard to the historical and contemporary representation of identity between the state and the self-representation of authority and governance, and between the claims of native settlers and the state to property and resources (see for example Sanders 2006). Because of this ambiguity, and the fact that the jurisdiction of formal and informal power structures often overlap, there are often multiple social and legal institutions that can be called upon to legitimise ‘Native, State and Settler’ claims to land and resources (Hodgson and Schroeder 2002). In the case of Sabah, Malaysia, land use zoning and planning regulations and policies based on the Town and Country Planning Ordinance, 1950 and the Lands and Surveys Ordinance, 1930 have been promoted to guide future development strategies (Government of Sabah 2002). Unfortunately, the resulting changes to the access, use and ownership of land have often produced tensions and even conflicts in state-people and people-state relationships (Lunkapis 2013). It is essential that these issues be addressed and understood as a way forward towards a just and civil society.Fig. 1


Secure land tenure as prerequisite towards sustainable living: a case study of native communities in Mantob village, Sabah, Malaysia.

Lunkapis GJ - Springerplus (2015)

Mantob Village, the water protection zone and the Crocker Range Park
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4582036&req=5

Fig1: Mantob Village, the water protection zone and the Crocker Range Park
Mentions: Sabah is located on the Northern Tip of Borneo, the third largest island in the world and host of the first popular television series, the Survivor (Fig. 1). Borneo’s people are a mosaic of culturally distinct native groups scattered across the highland and known for their strong interdependence with natural resources. These native peoples gained access to natural resources through kinship, local customs and through international conventions (Doolittle 2005), but different interpretations of the ways in which this access is gained may give rise to complications. There will definitely be some sort of ambiguity with regard to the historical and contemporary representation of identity between the state and the self-representation of authority and governance, and between the claims of native settlers and the state to property and resources (see for example Sanders 2006). Because of this ambiguity, and the fact that the jurisdiction of formal and informal power structures often overlap, there are often multiple social and legal institutions that can be called upon to legitimise ‘Native, State and Settler’ claims to land and resources (Hodgson and Schroeder 2002). In the case of Sabah, Malaysia, land use zoning and planning regulations and policies based on the Town and Country Planning Ordinance, 1950 and the Lands and Surveys Ordinance, 1930 have been promoted to guide future development strategies (Government of Sabah 2002). Unfortunately, the resulting changes to the access, use and ownership of land have often produced tensions and even conflicts in state-people and people-state relationships (Lunkapis 2013). It is essential that these issues be addressed and understood as a way forward towards a just and civil society.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: A combination of quantitative and qualitative method is used to understand the dynamics of the strategy used by the native communities to adapt to these policy changes.The findings reveal how the natives have employed an adaptive strategy in response to state policy changes.The lessons learned from this study can provide useful pointers as to how state policies, in relation to highland settlements in the state of Sabah, Malaysia, can be improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Humanities, Arts and Heritage, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Sustainable livelihoods, once enjoyed by native communities, are often threatened and in danger of extinction when new regulations and other forms of restrictions are introduced. These restrictions are often promoted with intended purposes, such as protecting the environment or securing resources from encroachment. However, these acts are slowly replacing the traditional adat (customs and traditions), which are used to define the rights attached to the use of communal and ancestral land. This is especially true when comes to access to forest products and land, in which native communities have used for generations. What the natives see as legitimate and traditional use, the state sees as an encroachment of property; and it has now become illegal to utilise these resources. This paper presents how native communities have adapted to such restrictions and continued to live in a sustainable manner through an adaptive strategy that is in line with state policy changes. A combination of quantitative and qualitative method is used to understand the dynamics of the strategy used by the native communities to adapt to these policy changes. The findings reveal how the natives have employed an adaptive strategy in response to state policy changes. The lessons learned from this study can provide useful pointers as to how state policies, in relation to highland settlements in the state of Sabah, Malaysia, can be improved.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus