Limits...
Intermittent Noise Induces Physiological Stress in a Coastal Marine Fish.

Nichols TA, Anderson TW, Širović A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution.In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels.These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology and Coastal and Marine Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution. Noise has the potential to induce physiological stress in marine fishes, which may have negative ecological consequences. In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels. Giant kelpfish exhibited acute stress responses when exposed to intermittent noise, but not to continuous noise or control conditions (playback of recorded natural ambient sound). These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cortisol response to different temporal patterns of playback of recorded boat noise and natural sound.Mean (+SE) cortisol response of juvenile giant kelpfish using playback of recorded natural sound as a control and different temporal patterns of increased noise. Different letters denote statistically significant differences among treatments based on Tukey’s HSD test. Three fish were used per replicate (n = 6).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581866&req=5

pone.0139157.g003: Cortisol response to different temporal patterns of playback of recorded boat noise and natural sound.Mean (+SE) cortisol response of juvenile giant kelpfish using playback of recorded natural sound as a control and different temporal patterns of increased noise. Different letters denote statistically significant differences among treatments based on Tukey’s HSD test. Three fish were used per replicate (n = 6).

Mentions: Juvenile giant kelpfish exposed to random intermittent noise exhibited significantly higher cortisol concentrations than those that were exposed to continuous noise and control treatments (ANOVA, F3,20 = 4.27, p = 0.018, Fig 3; S3 Data). Cortisol response to random intermittent noise, however, was not significantly different from regular intermittent noise, which in turn, was not significantly different from any of the other three treatments (Fig 3; S3 Data).


Intermittent Noise Induces Physiological Stress in a Coastal Marine Fish.

Nichols TA, Anderson TW, Širović A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Cortisol response to different temporal patterns of playback of recorded boat noise and natural sound.Mean (+SE) cortisol response of juvenile giant kelpfish using playback of recorded natural sound as a control and different temporal patterns of increased noise. Different letters denote statistically significant differences among treatments based on Tukey’s HSD test. Three fish were used per replicate (n = 6).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581866&req=5

pone.0139157.g003: Cortisol response to different temporal patterns of playback of recorded boat noise and natural sound.Mean (+SE) cortisol response of juvenile giant kelpfish using playback of recorded natural sound as a control and different temporal patterns of increased noise. Different letters denote statistically significant differences among treatments based on Tukey’s HSD test. Three fish were used per replicate (n = 6).
Mentions: Juvenile giant kelpfish exposed to random intermittent noise exhibited significantly higher cortisol concentrations than those that were exposed to continuous noise and control treatments (ANOVA, F3,20 = 4.27, p = 0.018, Fig 3; S3 Data). Cortisol response to random intermittent noise, however, was not significantly different from regular intermittent noise, which in turn, was not significantly different from any of the other three treatments (Fig 3; S3 Data).

Bottom Line: Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution.In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels.These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology and Coastal and Marine Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution. Noise has the potential to induce physiological stress in marine fishes, which may have negative ecological consequences. In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels. Giant kelpfish exhibited acute stress responses when exposed to intermittent noise, but not to continuous noise or control conditions (playback of recorded natural ambient sound). These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus