Limits...
Evaluation of the Relationship between Current Internal 137Cs Exposure in Residents and Soil Contamination West of Chernobyl in Northern Ukraine.

Kimura Y, Okubo Y, Hayashida N, Takahashi J, Gutevich A, Chorniy S, Kudo T, Takamura N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: After 2010, the annual effective doses were less than 0.1 mSv in over 90% of the residents.The 137Cs body burden was significantly higher in autumn than other seasons (p < 0.001) and in residents living in more contaminated areas (p < 0.001).In conclusion, more than 25 years after the Chernobyl accident, the internal exposure doses to residents living in contaminated areas of northern Ukraine is limited but still related to 137Cs soil contamination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

ABSTRACT
After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, the residents living around the Chernobyl were revealed to have been internally exposed to 137Cs through the intake of contaminated local foods. To evaluate the current situation of internal 137Cs exposure and the relationship between the 137Cs soil contamination and internal exposure in residents, we investigated the 137Cs body burden in residents who were living in 10 selected cities from the northern part of the Zhitomir region, Ukraine, and collected soil samples from three family farms and wild forests of each city to measured 137Cs concentrations. The total number of study participants was 36,862, of which 68.9% of them were female. After 2010, the annual effective doses were less than 0.1 mSv in over 90% of the residents. The 137Cs body burden was significantly higher in autumn than other seasons (p < 0.001) and in residents living in more contaminated areas (p < 0.001). We also found a significant correlation between the proportion of residents in each city with an estimated annual exposure dose exceeding 0.1 mSv and 137Cs concentration of soil samples from family farms (r = 0.828, p = 0.003). In conclusion, more than 25 years after the Chernobyl accident, the internal exposure doses to residents living in contaminated areas of northern Ukraine is limited but still related to 137Cs soil contamination. Furthermore, the consumption of local foods is considered to be the cause of internal exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The study area.10 cities were selected from north part of Zhitomir region, Ukraine, southwest from Chernobyl. In Ukraine, a classification of 4 contamination zones was established. The zones were defined according to soil contamination levels of 137Cs as zone I (> 1480 kBq/m2), zone II (555 kBq/m2–1480 kBq/m2), zone III (185 kBq/m2–555 kBq/m2) and zone IV (37 kBq/m2–185 kBq/m2). The 10 cities we chosen were classified to zone II-IV as shown in the table. This map was modified from copyright free maps provided by DesignExchange Co. Ltd and Ministry of Emergency and Protection of Chernobyl-affected people, Ukraine.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581839&req=5

pone.0139007.g001: The study area.10 cities were selected from north part of Zhitomir region, Ukraine, southwest from Chernobyl. In Ukraine, a classification of 4 contamination zones was established. The zones were defined according to soil contamination levels of 137Cs as zone I (> 1480 kBq/m2), zone II (555 kBq/m2–1480 kBq/m2), zone III (185 kBq/m2–555 kBq/m2) and zone IV (37 kBq/m2–185 kBq/m2). The 10 cities we chosen were classified to zone II-IV as shown in the table. This map was modified from copyright free maps provided by DesignExchange Co. Ltd and Ministry of Emergency and Protection of Chernobyl-affected people, Ukraine.

Mentions: We conducted this study in the northern part of the Zhitomir region in Ukraine. This area is located southwest of Chernobyl and was strongly affected by the accident at CNPP. From this region, we selected 10 cities with 100 or more inhabitants who underwent 137Cs body burden screening at the Zhitomir Inter-Regional Diagnostic Center (referred to hereafter as “the Center”) each year in Korosten city (Fig 1). In Ukraine, a classification of four contamination zones was established. The zones were defined according to soil contamination levels of 137Cs as zone I (> 1480 kBq/m2), zone II (555 kBq/m2–1480 kBq/m2), zone III (185 kBq/m2–555 kBq/m2) and zone IV (37 kBq/m2–185 kBq/m2). The 10 cities we chose were classified to zone II, III and IV, as shown in Fig 1. Narodichi was the only city in zone II for which the Center had responsibility for health screening and which had around 100 residents undergoing WBC screening each year. Data for the 137Cs body burden of residents in zone I were not available, as the Center did not cover the health care screening of residents living there.


Evaluation of the Relationship between Current Internal 137Cs Exposure in Residents and Soil Contamination West of Chernobyl in Northern Ukraine.

Kimura Y, Okubo Y, Hayashida N, Takahashi J, Gutevich A, Chorniy S, Kudo T, Takamura N - PLoS ONE (2015)

The study area.10 cities were selected from north part of Zhitomir region, Ukraine, southwest from Chernobyl. In Ukraine, a classification of 4 contamination zones was established. The zones were defined according to soil contamination levels of 137Cs as zone I (> 1480 kBq/m2), zone II (555 kBq/m2–1480 kBq/m2), zone III (185 kBq/m2–555 kBq/m2) and zone IV (37 kBq/m2–185 kBq/m2). The 10 cities we chosen were classified to zone II-IV as shown in the table. This map was modified from copyright free maps provided by DesignExchange Co. Ltd and Ministry of Emergency and Protection of Chernobyl-affected people, Ukraine.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581839&req=5

pone.0139007.g001: The study area.10 cities were selected from north part of Zhitomir region, Ukraine, southwest from Chernobyl. In Ukraine, a classification of 4 contamination zones was established. The zones were defined according to soil contamination levels of 137Cs as zone I (> 1480 kBq/m2), zone II (555 kBq/m2–1480 kBq/m2), zone III (185 kBq/m2–555 kBq/m2) and zone IV (37 kBq/m2–185 kBq/m2). The 10 cities we chosen were classified to zone II-IV as shown in the table. This map was modified from copyright free maps provided by DesignExchange Co. Ltd and Ministry of Emergency and Protection of Chernobyl-affected people, Ukraine.
Mentions: We conducted this study in the northern part of the Zhitomir region in Ukraine. This area is located southwest of Chernobyl and was strongly affected by the accident at CNPP. From this region, we selected 10 cities with 100 or more inhabitants who underwent 137Cs body burden screening at the Zhitomir Inter-Regional Diagnostic Center (referred to hereafter as “the Center”) each year in Korosten city (Fig 1). In Ukraine, a classification of four contamination zones was established. The zones were defined according to soil contamination levels of 137Cs as zone I (> 1480 kBq/m2), zone II (555 kBq/m2–1480 kBq/m2), zone III (185 kBq/m2–555 kBq/m2) and zone IV (37 kBq/m2–185 kBq/m2). The 10 cities we chose were classified to zone II, III and IV, as shown in Fig 1. Narodichi was the only city in zone II for which the Center had responsibility for health screening and which had around 100 residents undergoing WBC screening each year. Data for the 137Cs body burden of residents in zone I were not available, as the Center did not cover the health care screening of residents living there.

Bottom Line: After 2010, the annual effective doses were less than 0.1 mSv in over 90% of the residents.The 137Cs body burden was significantly higher in autumn than other seasons (p < 0.001) and in residents living in more contaminated areas (p < 0.001).In conclusion, more than 25 years after the Chernobyl accident, the internal exposure doses to residents living in contaminated areas of northern Ukraine is limited but still related to 137Cs soil contamination.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Global Health, Medicine and Welfare, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

ABSTRACT
After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, the residents living around the Chernobyl were revealed to have been internally exposed to 137Cs through the intake of contaminated local foods. To evaluate the current situation of internal 137Cs exposure and the relationship between the 137Cs soil contamination and internal exposure in residents, we investigated the 137Cs body burden in residents who were living in 10 selected cities from the northern part of the Zhitomir region, Ukraine, and collected soil samples from three family farms and wild forests of each city to measured 137Cs concentrations. The total number of study participants was 36,862, of which 68.9% of them were female. After 2010, the annual effective doses were less than 0.1 mSv in over 90% of the residents. The 137Cs body burden was significantly higher in autumn than other seasons (p < 0.001) and in residents living in more contaminated areas (p < 0.001). We also found a significant correlation between the proportion of residents in each city with an estimated annual exposure dose exceeding 0.1 mSv and 137Cs concentration of soil samples from family farms (r = 0.828, p = 0.003). In conclusion, more than 25 years after the Chernobyl accident, the internal exposure doses to residents living in contaminated areas of northern Ukraine is limited but still related to 137Cs soil contamination. Furthermore, the consumption of local foods is considered to be the cause of internal exposure.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus