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Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients.

Cavalcante PA, Rica RL, Evangelista AL, Serra AJ, Figueira A, Pontes FL, Kilgore L, Baker JS, Bocalini DS - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Bottom Line: Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension.The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women.No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Physiology Laboratory, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil ; Postgraduate Program in Physical Education and Aging Science, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: -11%±1.0% and 80%: -13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: -12%±5.5% and 80%: -12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: -15%±2.1% and 80%: -17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Values expressed as the mean ± standard error deviation of postexercise hypotension at control trial.Notes: (A) Systolic blood pressure (SBP); (B) diastolic blood pressure (DBP); (C) mean blood pressure (MBP); (D) heart rate (HR); and (E) rate-pressure product (RPP). *P<0.01 indicates statistically significant differences to rest. #Indicates statistically significant differences to control trial.
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f2-cia-10-1487: Values expressed as the mean ± standard error deviation of postexercise hypotension at control trial.Notes: (A) Systolic blood pressure (SBP); (B) diastolic blood pressure (DBP); (C) mean blood pressure (MBP); (D) heart rate (HR); and (E) rate-pressure product (RPP). *P<0.01 indicates statistically significant differences to rest. #Indicates statistically significant differences to control trial.

Mentions: No differences were found between the control measures. However, significant differences were found between exercise conditions immediately after exercise, compared to C (P<0.01). Regarding both (40% and 80% load) training protocols, significant differences were found (P<0.001) between the values at rest and those immediately after the exercise session as illustrated in Figure 2. Differences (P<0.02) were found in SBP (rest: 123±3 mmHg and immediately after exercise: 133±4 mmHg), MBP (rest: 99±3 mmHg and immediately after exercise: 106±2 mmHg), HR (rest: 80±4 bpm and immediately after exercise: 90±3 bpm), and RPP (rest: 9,840±300 mmHg × bpm and immediately after exercise: 11,970±478 mmHg × bpm) at 40% 1RM.


Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients.

Cavalcante PA, Rica RL, Evangelista AL, Serra AJ, Figueira A, Pontes FL, Kilgore L, Baker JS, Bocalini DS - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Values expressed as the mean ± standard error deviation of postexercise hypotension at control trial.Notes: (A) Systolic blood pressure (SBP); (B) diastolic blood pressure (DBP); (C) mean blood pressure (MBP); (D) heart rate (HR); and (E) rate-pressure product (RPP). *P<0.01 indicates statistically significant differences to rest. #Indicates statistically significant differences to control trial.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581782&req=5

f2-cia-10-1487: Values expressed as the mean ± standard error deviation of postexercise hypotension at control trial.Notes: (A) Systolic blood pressure (SBP); (B) diastolic blood pressure (DBP); (C) mean blood pressure (MBP); (D) heart rate (HR); and (E) rate-pressure product (RPP). *P<0.01 indicates statistically significant differences to rest. #Indicates statistically significant differences to control trial.
Mentions: No differences were found between the control measures. However, significant differences were found between exercise conditions immediately after exercise, compared to C (P<0.01). Regarding both (40% and 80% load) training protocols, significant differences were found (P<0.001) between the values at rest and those immediately after the exercise session as illustrated in Figure 2. Differences (P<0.02) were found in SBP (rest: 123±3 mmHg and immediately after exercise: 133±4 mmHg), MBP (rest: 99±3 mmHg and immediately after exercise: 106±2 mmHg), HR (rest: 80±4 bpm and immediately after exercise: 90±3 bpm), and RPP (rest: 9,840±300 mmHg × bpm and immediately after exercise: 11,970±478 mmHg × bpm) at 40% 1RM.

Bottom Line: Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension.The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women.No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Physiology Laboratory, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil ; Postgraduate Program in Physical Education and Aging Science, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: -11%±1.0% and 80%: -13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: -12%±5.5% and 80%: -12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: -15%±2.1% and 80%: -17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus