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Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients.

Cavalcante PA, Rica RL, Evangelista AL, Serra AJ, Figueira A, Pontes FL, Kilgore L, Baker JS, Bocalini DS - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Bottom Line: Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension.The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women.No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Physiology Laboratory, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil ; Postgraduate Program in Physical Education and Aging Science, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: -11%±1.0% and 80%: -13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: -12%±5.5% and 80%: -12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: -15%±2.1% and 80%: -17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Experimental design (flow diagram).
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f1-cia-10-1487: Experimental design (flow diagram).

Mentions: The three experimental sessions were randomized to implemented with subjects. The first session was conducted 48 hours after determining the load to be used in experimental session (control trial, 40% and 80% of 1RM load). Additionally, the experimental session interval was repeated 48 hours after last session conducted (shown in Figure 1). Conforming to previous publication,23 after 1RM testing and determination of loads corresponding to 40% (light load) and 80% (heavy load) of 1RM, subjects were released and told to return to the lab after 48 hours for the first randomly selected experimental exercise session using either the predetermined 40% or 80% loads and 10–12 repetitions.23,33 The order of exercise was leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Sessions were completed in 40 minutes. Volunteers were also instructed to avoid the Valsalva maneuver during the entire movement, following American College of Sports Medicine guidelines. As the exercises were conducted on resistance machines, there was lumbar and thoracic support present, and the Valsalva was not obligatory for vertebral support and safety. After completion of the first exercise session, individuals were released, and after 48 hours, they returned to the laboratory to perform the remaining session(s). All exercise sessions were performed at the same time of day to minimize the effect of diurnal variation.


Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients.

Cavalcante PA, Rica RL, Evangelista AL, Serra AJ, Figueira A, Pontes FL, Kilgore L, Baker JS, Bocalini DS - Clin Interv Aging (2015)

Experimental design (flow diagram).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581782&req=5

f1-cia-10-1487: Experimental design (flow diagram).
Mentions: The three experimental sessions were randomized to implemented with subjects. The first session was conducted 48 hours after determining the load to be used in experimental session (control trial, 40% and 80% of 1RM load). Additionally, the experimental session interval was repeated 48 hours after last session conducted (shown in Figure 1). Conforming to previous publication,23 after 1RM testing and determination of loads corresponding to 40% (light load) and 80% (heavy load) of 1RM, subjects were released and told to return to the lab after 48 hours for the first randomly selected experimental exercise session using either the predetermined 40% or 80% loads and 10–12 repetitions.23,33 The order of exercise was leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Sessions were completed in 40 minutes. Volunteers were also instructed to avoid the Valsalva maneuver during the entire movement, following American College of Sports Medicine guidelines. As the exercises were conducted on resistance machines, there was lumbar and thoracic support present, and the Valsalva was not obligatory for vertebral support and safety. After completion of the first exercise session, individuals were released, and after 48 hours, they returned to the laboratory to perform the remaining session(s). All exercise sessions were performed at the same time of day to minimize the effect of diurnal variation.

Bottom Line: Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension.The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women.No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Translational Physiology Laboratory, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil ; Postgraduate Program in Physical Education and Aging Science, São Judas Tadeu University (USJT), São Paulo, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: -11%±1.0% and 80%: -13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: -12%±5.5% and 80%: -12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: -15%±2.1% and 80%: -17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus