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Beliefs and attitudes towards mental illness: an examination of the sex differences in mental health literacy in a community sample.

Gibbons RJ, Thorsteinsson EB, Loi NM - PeerJ (2015)

Bottom Line: Results.Males exhibited poorer mental health literacy skills compared to females.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England , NSW , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. The current study investigated mental health literacy in an Australian sample to examine sex differences in the identification of and attitudes towards various aspects of mental illness. Method. An online questionnaire was completed by 373 participants (M = 34.87 years). Participants were randomly assigned either a male or female version of a vignette depicting an individual exhibiting the symptoms of one of three types of mental illness (depression, anxiety, or psychosis) and asked to answer questions relating to aspects of mental health literacy. Results. Males exhibited poorer mental health literacy skills compared to females. Males were less likely to correctly identify the type of mental illness, more likely to rate symptoms as less serious, to perceive the individual as having greater personal control over such symptoms, and less likely to endorse the need for treatment for anxiety or psychosis. Conclusion. Generally, the sample was relatively proficient at correctly identifying mental illness but overall males displayed poorer mental health literacy skills than females.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Image of perceived level of personal control over mental illness for each protagonist sex as rated by each participant sex.
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fig-2: Image of perceived level of personal control over mental illness for each protagonist sex as rated by each participant sex.

Mentions: There was a significant interaction between participant and protagonist sex for personal control, see Table 1, indicating that the effect that participant sex has on perceived level of control over mental illness is dependent on the type of protagonist sex. Analysis of simple effects was conducted using separate one-way between groups ANOVAs to determine the effects of participant and protagonist sex. For males there was no significant difference between protagonist sex, F(1, 104) = 3.05, p = .08, partial η2 = .03. For females there was no significant difference between the protagonist sex, F(1, 265) = 0.74, p = .39, partial η2 < .01. For male protagonists there was no significant difference between participant sex, F(1, 180) = 0.23, p = .64, partial η2 < .01. For female protagonists there was a significant difference between participant sex, F(1, 189) = 10.77, p = .001, partial η2 = .05, with male participants rating a higher level of perceived control than females, see Fig. 2.


Beliefs and attitudes towards mental illness: an examination of the sex differences in mental health literacy in a community sample.

Gibbons RJ, Thorsteinsson EB, Loi NM - PeerJ (2015)

Image of perceived level of personal control over mental illness for each protagonist sex as rated by each participant sex.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581769&req=5

fig-2: Image of perceived level of personal control over mental illness for each protagonist sex as rated by each participant sex.
Mentions: There was a significant interaction between participant and protagonist sex for personal control, see Table 1, indicating that the effect that participant sex has on perceived level of control over mental illness is dependent on the type of protagonist sex. Analysis of simple effects was conducted using separate one-way between groups ANOVAs to determine the effects of participant and protagonist sex. For males there was no significant difference between protagonist sex, F(1, 104) = 3.05, p = .08, partial η2 = .03. For females there was no significant difference between the protagonist sex, F(1, 265) = 0.74, p = .39, partial η2 < .01. For male protagonists there was no significant difference between participant sex, F(1, 180) = 0.23, p = .64, partial η2 < .01. For female protagonists there was a significant difference between participant sex, F(1, 189) = 10.77, p = .001, partial η2 = .05, with male participants rating a higher level of perceived control than females, see Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: Results.Males exhibited poorer mental health literacy skills compared to females.Conclusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, School of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciences, University of New England , NSW , Australia.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. The current study investigated mental health literacy in an Australian sample to examine sex differences in the identification of and attitudes towards various aspects of mental illness. Method. An online questionnaire was completed by 373 participants (M = 34.87 years). Participants were randomly assigned either a male or female version of a vignette depicting an individual exhibiting the symptoms of one of three types of mental illness (depression, anxiety, or psychosis) and asked to answer questions relating to aspects of mental health literacy. Results. Males exhibited poorer mental health literacy skills compared to females. Males were less likely to correctly identify the type of mental illness, more likely to rate symptoms as less serious, to perceive the individual as having greater personal control over such symptoms, and less likely to endorse the need for treatment for anxiety or psychosis. Conclusion. Generally, the sample was relatively proficient at correctly identifying mental illness but overall males displayed poorer mental health literacy skills than females.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus