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Essential oil of Artemisia vestita exhibits potent in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity: Investigation of the effect of oil on biofilm formation, leakage of potassium ions and survival curve measurement.

Yang C, Hu DH, Feng Y - Mol Med Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Survival curves indicated that the essential oil led to a reduction in the viability of different bacteria.The essential oil also induced significant leakage of potassium ions from S. pyogenes.In conclusion, the in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the essential oil of A. vestita and one of its major constituents, grandisol, can significantly inhibit the growth of different bacterial strains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital of Hubei Province, Wuhan, Hubei 430033, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemical composition of the essential oil of Artemisia vestita and to determine the antibacterial activity of the essential oil and its two major components, grandisol and 1,8‑cineole, against certain respiratory infection‑causing bacterial strains, in vitro and in vivo. The chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed using gas chromatography‑mass spectrometry. A micro‑well dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values of the essential oil and its major constituents. A model of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in mice was used to determine its in vivo activities. Lung and blood samples were obtained to assess bacterial cell counts. Toxicity evaluation of the essential oil and its components was completed by performing biochemical analysis of the serum, particularly monitoring aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, urea and creatinine. The essential oil exhibited potent antibacterial activity, whereas the two major constituents were less potent. The essential oil exhibited MIC values between 20 and 80 µg/ml, while the values of the two constituents were between 130 and 200 µg/ml. Scanning electron microscopy results demonstrated that the essential oil inhibited biofilm formation and altered its architecture. Survival curves indicated that the essential oil led to a reduction in the viability of different bacteria. The essential oil also induced significant leakage of potassium ions from S. pyogenes. The essential oil (100 µg/mouse) and grandisol (135 µg/mouse) significantly reduced the number of viable bacterial cells in the lungs (P<0.01). However, intake of 100 µg/mouse of essential oil or grandisol 135 µg/mouse once or twice each day for 9 days did not produce any toxic effects in the mice. In conclusion, the in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the essential oil of A. vestita and one of its major constituents, grandisol, can significantly inhibit the growth of different bacterial strains.

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Scanning electron microscopy (magnification, ×3,000) demonstrating the effects of different concentrations of Artemisia vestita essential oil on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pyogenes and its architecture. The (A) control and strains exposed to (B) 5, (C) 25 and (D) 50 μg/ml concentrations of the oil are presented.
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f4-mmr-12-04-5762: Scanning electron microscopy (magnification, ×3,000) demonstrating the effects of different concentrations of Artemisia vestita essential oil on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pyogenes and its architecture. The (A) control and strains exposed to (B) 5, (C) 25 and (D) 50 μg/ml concentrations of the oil are presented.

Mentions: SEM investigations were performed on S. pyogenes in order to evaluate whether the essential oil of A. vestita induces morphological changes in this bacterial strain, and to evaluate the effect of the oil on surface topography and architecture of the biofilms formed by S. pyogenes. The results, as shown in Fig. 4, indicated that the essential oil inhibited the biofilm formation of S. pyogenes. A total of three different concentrations of the oil (5, 25 and 50 μg/ml) were used and it was revealed that 50 μg/ml oil restricted the attachment of bacterial cells of S. pyogenes significantly, compared with the control (Fig. 4A). Overall, the effect of the oil on S. pyogenes biofilm formation was dose-dependent, exhibiting maximal inhibition at a concentration of 50 μg/ml.


Essential oil of Artemisia vestita exhibits potent in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity: Investigation of the effect of oil on biofilm formation, leakage of potassium ions and survival curve measurement.

Yang C, Hu DH, Feng Y - Mol Med Rep (2015)

Scanning electron microscopy (magnification, ×3,000) demonstrating the effects of different concentrations of Artemisia vestita essential oil on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pyogenes and its architecture. The (A) control and strains exposed to (B) 5, (C) 25 and (D) 50 μg/ml concentrations of the oil are presented.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581751&req=5

f4-mmr-12-04-5762: Scanning electron microscopy (magnification, ×3,000) demonstrating the effects of different concentrations of Artemisia vestita essential oil on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pyogenes and its architecture. The (A) control and strains exposed to (B) 5, (C) 25 and (D) 50 μg/ml concentrations of the oil are presented.
Mentions: SEM investigations were performed on S. pyogenes in order to evaluate whether the essential oil of A. vestita induces morphological changes in this bacterial strain, and to evaluate the effect of the oil on surface topography and architecture of the biofilms formed by S. pyogenes. The results, as shown in Fig. 4, indicated that the essential oil inhibited the biofilm formation of S. pyogenes. A total of three different concentrations of the oil (5, 25 and 50 μg/ml) were used and it was revealed that 50 μg/ml oil restricted the attachment of bacterial cells of S. pyogenes significantly, compared with the control (Fig. 4A). Overall, the effect of the oil on S. pyogenes biofilm formation was dose-dependent, exhibiting maximal inhibition at a concentration of 50 μg/ml.

Bottom Line: Survival curves indicated that the essential oil led to a reduction in the viability of different bacteria.The essential oil also induced significant leakage of potassium ions from S. pyogenes.In conclusion, the in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the essential oil of A. vestita and one of its major constituents, grandisol, can significantly inhibit the growth of different bacterial strains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Zhongshan Hospital of Hubei Province, Wuhan, Hubei 430033, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemical composition of the essential oil of Artemisia vestita and to determine the antibacterial activity of the essential oil and its two major components, grandisol and 1,8‑cineole, against certain respiratory infection‑causing bacterial strains, in vitro and in vivo. The chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed using gas chromatography‑mass spectrometry. A micro‑well dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values of the essential oil and its major constituents. A model of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in mice was used to determine its in vivo activities. Lung and blood samples were obtained to assess bacterial cell counts. Toxicity evaluation of the essential oil and its components was completed by performing biochemical analysis of the serum, particularly monitoring aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, urea and creatinine. The essential oil exhibited potent antibacterial activity, whereas the two major constituents were less potent. The essential oil exhibited MIC values between 20 and 80 µg/ml, while the values of the two constituents were between 130 and 200 µg/ml. Scanning electron microscopy results demonstrated that the essential oil inhibited biofilm formation and altered its architecture. Survival curves indicated that the essential oil led to a reduction in the viability of different bacteria. The essential oil also induced significant leakage of potassium ions from S. pyogenes. The essential oil (100 µg/mouse) and grandisol (135 µg/mouse) significantly reduced the number of viable bacterial cells in the lungs (P<0.01). However, intake of 100 µg/mouse of essential oil or grandisol 135 µg/mouse once or twice each day for 9 days did not produce any toxic effects in the mice. In conclusion, the in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the essential oil of A. vestita and one of its major constituents, grandisol, can significantly inhibit the growth of different bacterial strains.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus