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Revisiting the Relationship between Individual Differences in Analytic Thinking and Religious Belief: Evidence That Measurement Order Moderates Their Inverse Correlation.

Finley AJ, Tang D, Schmeichel BJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Prior research has found that persons who favor more analytic modes of thought are less religious.We propose that individual differences in analytic thought are associated with reduced religious beliefs particularly when analytic thought is measured (hence, primed) first.The current study suggests that whereas inducing analytic processing may reduce religious belief, more analytic thinkers are not necessarily less religious.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Prior research has found that persons who favor more analytic modes of thought are less religious. We propose that individual differences in analytic thought are associated with reduced religious beliefs particularly when analytic thought is measured (hence, primed) first. The current study provides a direct replication of prior evidence that individual differences in analytic thinking are negatively related to religious beliefs when analytic thought is measured before religious beliefs. When religious belief is measured before analytic thinking, however, the negative relationship is reduced to non-significance, suggesting that the link between analytic thought and religious belief is more tenuous than previously reported. The current study suggests that whereas inducing analytic processing may reduce religious belief, more analytic thinkers are not necessarily less religious. The potential for measurement order to inflate the inverse correlation between analytic thinking and religious beliefs deserves additional consideration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Religious Beliefs as Function of Task Order and Analytic Thinking.Religious beliefs composite score as a function of task order and analytic thinking (CRT score). The solid line is the analytic first condition, whereas the dashed line is the religious beliefs first condition.
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pone.0138922.g001: Religious Beliefs as Function of Task Order and Analytic Thinking.Religious beliefs composite score as a function of task order and analytic thinking (CRT score). The solid line is the analytic first condition, whereas the dashed line is the religious beliefs first condition.

Mentions: To probe the two-way interaction we calculated simple slopes at 1 SD above and below the mean in analytic thinking. In the analytic first condition the relationship between analytic thinking and religious beliefs was significant and negative, b = -0.31, t (406) = 2.81, p = .005, whereas in the religious beliefs first condition the same relationship was non-significant, b = 0.02, t (406) = 0.23, p = .815. See Fig 1.


Revisiting the Relationship between Individual Differences in Analytic Thinking and Religious Belief: Evidence That Measurement Order Moderates Their Inverse Correlation.

Finley AJ, Tang D, Schmeichel BJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Religious Beliefs as Function of Task Order and Analytic Thinking.Religious beliefs composite score as a function of task order and analytic thinking (CRT score). The solid line is the analytic first condition, whereas the dashed line is the religious beliefs first condition.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581709&req=5

pone.0138922.g001: Religious Beliefs as Function of Task Order and Analytic Thinking.Religious beliefs composite score as a function of task order and analytic thinking (CRT score). The solid line is the analytic first condition, whereas the dashed line is the religious beliefs first condition.
Mentions: To probe the two-way interaction we calculated simple slopes at 1 SD above and below the mean in analytic thinking. In the analytic first condition the relationship between analytic thinking and religious beliefs was significant and negative, b = -0.31, t (406) = 2.81, p = .005, whereas in the religious beliefs first condition the same relationship was non-significant, b = 0.02, t (406) = 0.23, p = .815. See Fig 1.

Bottom Line: Prior research has found that persons who favor more analytic modes of thought are less religious.We propose that individual differences in analytic thought are associated with reduced religious beliefs particularly when analytic thought is measured (hence, primed) first.The current study suggests that whereas inducing analytic processing may reduce religious belief, more analytic thinkers are not necessarily less religious.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Prior research has found that persons who favor more analytic modes of thought are less religious. We propose that individual differences in analytic thought are associated with reduced religious beliefs particularly when analytic thought is measured (hence, primed) first. The current study provides a direct replication of prior evidence that individual differences in analytic thinking are negatively related to religious beliefs when analytic thought is measured before religious beliefs. When religious belief is measured before analytic thinking, however, the negative relationship is reduced to non-significance, suggesting that the link between analytic thought and religious belief is more tenuous than previously reported. The current study suggests that whereas inducing analytic processing may reduce religious belief, more analytic thinkers are not necessarily less religious. The potential for measurement order to inflate the inverse correlation between analytic thinking and religious beliefs deserves additional consideration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus