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Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training in a Gym Setting Improves Cardio-Metabolic and Psychological Health.

Shepherd SO, Wilson OJ, Taylor AS, Thøgersen-Ntoumani C, Adlan AM, Wagenmakers AJ, Shaw CS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05).With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Sport & Exercise Sciences (RISES), Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Within a controlled laboratory environment, high-intensity interval training (HIT) elicits similar cardiovascular and metabolic benefits as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.

Purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that 10 weeks of HIT, performed in an instructor-led, group-based gym setting, elicits improvements in aerobic capacity (VO2max), cardio-metabolic risk and psychological health which are comparable to MICT.

Methods: Ninety physically inactive volunteers (42±11 y, 27.7±4.8 kg.m-2) were randomly assigned to HIT or MICT group exercise classes. HIT consisted of repeated sprints (15-60 seconds, >90% HRmax) interspersed with periods of recovery cycling (≤25 min.session-1, 3 sessions.week-1). MICT participants performed continuous cycling (~70% HRmax, 30-45 min.session-1, 5 sessions.week-1). VO2max, markers of cardio-metabolic risk, and psychological health were assessed pre and post-intervention.

Results: Mean weekly training time was 55±10 (HIT) and 128±44 min (MICT) (p<0.05), with greater adherence to HIT (83±14% vs. 61±15% prescribed sessions attended, respectively; p<0.05). HIT improved VO2max, insulin sensitivity, reduced abdominal fat mass, and induced favourable changes in blood lipids (p<0.05). HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05). No difference between HIT and MICT was seen for any of these variables.

Conclusions: HIT performed in a real-world gym setting improves cardio-metabolic risk factors and psychological health in physically inactive adults. With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Oral glucose tolerance test responses.Plasma glucose (A) and insulin (B) concentrations during an oral glucose tolerance test, including corresponding total area under the curve (AUC, C and D, respectively) before and after HIT or MICT. Changes in insulin sensitivity as determined using the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index in response to HIT and MICT (E). Values are presented as means ± SD. *Main training effect (p<0.05). Values in parentheses represent the mean percentage change from pre-training.
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pone.0139056.g003: Oral glucose tolerance test responses.Plasma glucose (A) and insulin (B) concentrations during an oral glucose tolerance test, including corresponding total area under the curve (AUC, C and D, respectively) before and after HIT or MICT. Changes in insulin sensitivity as determined using the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index in response to HIT and MICT (E). Values are presented as means ± SD. *Main training effect (p<0.05). Values in parentheses represent the mean percentage change from pre-training.

Mentions: Insulin sensitivity and blood lipid concentrations are presented in Table 3 and Fig 3. No group differences were detected at baseline in any of the variables relating to insulin sensitivity or blood lipids (p>0.05). Training reduced fasting plasma insulin (F(1, 87) = 7.23; p = 0.01; ηp² = .08), whereas fasting plasma glucose was unchanged (p = 0.68), with no difference between groups. Notably, training reduced both plasma glucose area under the curve (AUC) (F(1, 86) = 17.36; p<0.001; ηp² = .17) and plasma insulin AUC (F(1, 86) = 25.71; p<0.001; ηp² = .23) during the OGTT, with no difference between groups (Fig 3C and 3D). An increase in insulin sensitivity was observed using both HOMA (F(1, 86) = 6.48; p = 0.013; ηp² = .07) and Matsuda (F(1, 86) = 14.18; p<0.001; ηp² = .14) indices of insulin sensitivity, with no difference between groups (Fig 3E). Training reduced fasting NEFA concentrations (F(1, 87) = 6.87; p = 0.01; ηp² = .07), whereas a trend for a reduction in fasting TG concentration was observed following training (F(1, 87) = 3.87; p = 0.052; ηp² = .04), with no difference between groups (Table 3). Total cholesterol (F(1, 87) = 14.54; p<0.001; ηp² = .14) and LDL-C (F(1, 87) = 10.72; p = 0.01; ηp² = .11) were also lower following training, whereas HDL-C concentrations were significantly increased (F(1, 87) = 5.61; p = 0.03; ηp² = .06), with no difference between groups (Table 3). Accordingly, the LDL-C to HDL-C ratio was reduced following training (F(1, 87) = 19.16; p<0.001; ηp² = .18), with no difference between groups (Table 3).


Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training in a Gym Setting Improves Cardio-Metabolic and Psychological Health.

Shepherd SO, Wilson OJ, Taylor AS, Thøgersen-Ntoumani C, Adlan AM, Wagenmakers AJ, Shaw CS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Oral glucose tolerance test responses.Plasma glucose (A) and insulin (B) concentrations during an oral glucose tolerance test, including corresponding total area under the curve (AUC, C and D, respectively) before and after HIT or MICT. Changes in insulin sensitivity as determined using the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index in response to HIT and MICT (E). Values are presented as means ± SD. *Main training effect (p<0.05). Values in parentheses represent the mean percentage change from pre-training.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581708&req=5

pone.0139056.g003: Oral glucose tolerance test responses.Plasma glucose (A) and insulin (B) concentrations during an oral glucose tolerance test, including corresponding total area under the curve (AUC, C and D, respectively) before and after HIT or MICT. Changes in insulin sensitivity as determined using the Matsuda insulin sensitivity index in response to HIT and MICT (E). Values are presented as means ± SD. *Main training effect (p<0.05). Values in parentheses represent the mean percentage change from pre-training.
Mentions: Insulin sensitivity and blood lipid concentrations are presented in Table 3 and Fig 3. No group differences were detected at baseline in any of the variables relating to insulin sensitivity or blood lipids (p>0.05). Training reduced fasting plasma insulin (F(1, 87) = 7.23; p = 0.01; ηp² = .08), whereas fasting plasma glucose was unchanged (p = 0.68), with no difference between groups. Notably, training reduced both plasma glucose area under the curve (AUC) (F(1, 86) = 17.36; p<0.001; ηp² = .17) and plasma insulin AUC (F(1, 86) = 25.71; p<0.001; ηp² = .23) during the OGTT, with no difference between groups (Fig 3C and 3D). An increase in insulin sensitivity was observed using both HOMA (F(1, 86) = 6.48; p = 0.013; ηp² = .07) and Matsuda (F(1, 86) = 14.18; p<0.001; ηp² = .14) indices of insulin sensitivity, with no difference between groups (Fig 3E). Training reduced fasting NEFA concentrations (F(1, 87) = 6.87; p = 0.01; ηp² = .07), whereas a trend for a reduction in fasting TG concentration was observed following training (F(1, 87) = 3.87; p = 0.052; ηp² = .04), with no difference between groups (Table 3). Total cholesterol (F(1, 87) = 14.54; p<0.001; ηp² = .14) and LDL-C (F(1, 87) = 10.72; p = 0.01; ηp² = .11) were also lower following training, whereas HDL-C concentrations were significantly increased (F(1, 87) = 5.61; p = 0.03; ηp² = .06), with no difference between groups (Table 3). Accordingly, the LDL-C to HDL-C ratio was reduced following training (F(1, 87) = 19.16; p<0.001; ηp² = .18), with no difference between groups (Table 3).

Bottom Line: It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05).With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Sport & Exercise Sciences (RISES), Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Within a controlled laboratory environment, high-intensity interval training (HIT) elicits similar cardiovascular and metabolic benefits as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.

Purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that 10 weeks of HIT, performed in an instructor-led, group-based gym setting, elicits improvements in aerobic capacity (VO2max), cardio-metabolic risk and psychological health which are comparable to MICT.

Methods: Ninety physically inactive volunteers (42±11 y, 27.7±4.8 kg.m-2) were randomly assigned to HIT or MICT group exercise classes. HIT consisted of repeated sprints (15-60 seconds, >90% HRmax) interspersed with periods of recovery cycling (≤25 min.session-1, 3 sessions.week-1). MICT participants performed continuous cycling (~70% HRmax, 30-45 min.session-1, 5 sessions.week-1). VO2max, markers of cardio-metabolic risk, and psychological health were assessed pre and post-intervention.

Results: Mean weekly training time was 55±10 (HIT) and 128±44 min (MICT) (p<0.05), with greater adherence to HIT (83±14% vs. 61±15% prescribed sessions attended, respectively; p<0.05). HIT improved VO2max, insulin sensitivity, reduced abdominal fat mass, and induced favourable changes in blood lipids (p<0.05). HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05). No difference between HIT and MICT was seen for any of these variables.

Conclusions: HIT performed in a real-world gym setting improves cardio-metabolic risk factors and psychological health in physically inactive adults. With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus