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Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training in a Gym Setting Improves Cardio-Metabolic and Psychological Health.

Shepherd SO, Wilson OJ, Taylor AS, Thøgersen-Ntoumani C, Adlan AM, Wagenmakers AJ, Shaw CS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05).With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Sport & Exercise Sciences (RISES), Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Within a controlled laboratory environment, high-intensity interval training (HIT) elicits similar cardiovascular and metabolic benefits as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.

Purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that 10 weeks of HIT, performed in an instructor-led, group-based gym setting, elicits improvements in aerobic capacity (VO2max), cardio-metabolic risk and psychological health which are comparable to MICT.

Methods: Ninety physically inactive volunteers (42±11 y, 27.7±4.8 kg.m-2) were randomly assigned to HIT or MICT group exercise classes. HIT consisted of repeated sprints (15-60 seconds, >90% HRmax) interspersed with periods of recovery cycling (≤25 min.session-1, 3 sessions.week-1). MICT participants performed continuous cycling (~70% HRmax, 30-45 min.session-1, 5 sessions.week-1). VO2max, markers of cardio-metabolic risk, and psychological health were assessed pre and post-intervention.

Results: Mean weekly training time was 55±10 (HIT) and 128±44 min (MICT) (p<0.05), with greater adherence to HIT (83±14% vs. 61±15% prescribed sessions attended, respectively; p<0.05). HIT improved VO2max, insulin sensitivity, reduced abdominal fat mass, and induced favourable changes in blood lipids (p<0.05). HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05). No difference between HIT and MICT was seen for any of these variables.

Conclusions: HIT performed in a real-world gym setting improves cardio-metabolic risk factors and psychological health in physically inactive adults. With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow chart of the study design.BMI body mass index, HIT high intensity interval training, MICT moderate-intensity continuous training.
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pone.0139056.g001: Flow chart of the study design.BMI body mass index, HIT high intensity interval training, MICT moderate-intensity continuous training.

Mentions: Participants initially performed a progressive exercise test to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer (Lode BV, Groningen, The Netherlands) to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), as previously described [14]. On a separate day (>48 hours following the VO2max test), subjects reported to the laboratory after an overnight fast (>10 hours), having completed a diet diary outlining their food intake in the preceding 24 hours period, which was collected and checked upon arrival. Following 15 minutes of supine rest, brachial artery blood pressure was measured, followed by an assessment of systemic arterial stiffness, as previously described [13]. A 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed, as described [14], to assess insulin sensitivity. Body composition was assessed using a single frequency bioimpedance device (Tanita BC 418 MA Segmental Body Composition Analyzer, Tanita, Japan). On completion of the pre-training experimental procedures, subjects were stratified into sub-groups according to gender, age (under/over 40 years) and BMI (under/over 27 kg.m-2). Within each sub-group subjects were then placed into pairs with one member from each pair randomly assigned to either HIT or MICT (Fig 1).


Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Training in a Gym Setting Improves Cardio-Metabolic and Psychological Health.

Shepherd SO, Wilson OJ, Taylor AS, Thøgersen-Ntoumani C, Adlan AM, Wagenmakers AJ, Shaw CS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow chart of the study design.BMI body mass index, HIT high intensity interval training, MICT moderate-intensity continuous training.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581708&req=5

pone.0139056.g001: Flow chart of the study design.BMI body mass index, HIT high intensity interval training, MICT moderate-intensity continuous training.
Mentions: Participants initially performed a progressive exercise test to volitional exhaustion on an electronically braked cycle ergometer (Lode BV, Groningen, The Netherlands) to determine maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), as previously described [14]. On a separate day (>48 hours following the VO2max test), subjects reported to the laboratory after an overnight fast (>10 hours), having completed a diet diary outlining their food intake in the preceding 24 hours period, which was collected and checked upon arrival. Following 15 minutes of supine rest, brachial artery blood pressure was measured, followed by an assessment of systemic arterial stiffness, as previously described [13]. A 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed, as described [14], to assess insulin sensitivity. Body composition was assessed using a single frequency bioimpedance device (Tanita BC 418 MA Segmental Body Composition Analyzer, Tanita, Japan). On completion of the pre-training experimental procedures, subjects were stratified into sub-groups according to gender, age (under/over 40 years) and BMI (under/over 27 kg.m-2). Within each sub-group subjects were then placed into pairs with one member from each pair randomly assigned to either HIT or MICT (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05).With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute for Sport & Exercise Sciences (RISES), Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Within a controlled laboratory environment, high-intensity interval training (HIT) elicits similar cardiovascular and metabolic benefits as traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT). It is currently unclear how HIT can be applied effectively in a real-world environment.

Purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that 10 weeks of HIT, performed in an instructor-led, group-based gym setting, elicits improvements in aerobic capacity (VO2max), cardio-metabolic risk and psychological health which are comparable to MICT.

Methods: Ninety physically inactive volunteers (42±11 y, 27.7±4.8 kg.m-2) were randomly assigned to HIT or MICT group exercise classes. HIT consisted of repeated sprints (15-60 seconds, >90% HRmax) interspersed with periods of recovery cycling (≤25 min.session-1, 3 sessions.week-1). MICT participants performed continuous cycling (~70% HRmax, 30-45 min.session-1, 5 sessions.week-1). VO2max, markers of cardio-metabolic risk, and psychological health were assessed pre and post-intervention.

Results: Mean weekly training time was 55±10 (HIT) and 128±44 min (MICT) (p<0.05), with greater adherence to HIT (83±14% vs. 61±15% prescribed sessions attended, respectively; p<0.05). HIT improved VO2max, insulin sensitivity, reduced abdominal fat mass, and induced favourable changes in blood lipids (p<0.05). HIT also induced beneficial effects on health perceptions, positive and negative affect, and subjective vitality (p<0.05). No difference between HIT and MICT was seen for any of these variables.

Conclusions: HIT performed in a real-world gym setting improves cardio-metabolic risk factors and psychological health in physically inactive adults. With a reduced time commitment and greater adherence than MICT, HIT offers a viable and effective exercise strategy to target the growing incidence of metabolic disease and psychological ill-being associated with physical inactivity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus