Limits...
Estimating the burden of foodborne diseases in Japan.

Kumagai Y, Gilmour S, Ota E, Momose Y, Onishi T, Bilano VL, Kasuga F, Sekizaki T, Shibuya K - Bull. World Health Organ. (2015)

Bottom Line: Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan .

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the burden posed by foodborne diseases in Japan using methods developed by the World Health Organization's Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG).

Methods: Expert consultation and statistics on food poisoning during 2011 were used to identify three common causes of foodborne disease in Japan: Campylobacter and Salmonella species and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). We conducted systematic reviews of English and Japanese literature on the complications caused by these pathogens, by searching Embase, the Japan medical society abstract database and Medline. We estimated the annual incidence of acute gastroenteritis from reported surveillance data, based on estimated probabilities that an affected person would visit a physician and have gastroenteritis confirmed. We then calculated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost in 2011, using the incidence estimates along with disability weights derived from published studies.

Findings: In 2011, foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter species, Salmonella species and EHEC led to an estimated loss of 6099, 3145 and 463 DALYs in Japan, respectively. These estimated burdens are based on the pyramid reconstruction method; are largely due to morbidity rather than mortality; and are much higher than those indicated by routine surveillance data.

Conclusion: Routine surveillance data may indicate foodborne disease burdens that are much lower than the true values. Most of the burden posed by foodborne disease in Japan comes from secondary complications. The tools developed by FERG appear useful in estimating disease burdens and setting priorities in the field of food safety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Estimates of the incidence of foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter, Salmonella or enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Japan, 2011
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581658&req=5

Figure 2: Estimates of the incidence of foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter, Salmonella or enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Japan, 2011

Mentions: Table 1 shows the incidence of gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Campylobacter, Salmonella or EHEC reported in the routine surveillance data, and the corresponding – much higher – adjusted incidences that we estimated using the pyramid reconstruction method. Fig. 2 shows the estimated annual incidence of acute gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Campylobacter, Salmonella or EHEC between 1996 or 1999 and 2011. Over this period, there was no clear trend in the incidence of acute gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Campylobacter or EHEC but the incidence of gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Salmonella appeared to fall substantially after 2002.


Estimating the burden of foodborne diseases in Japan.

Kumagai Y, Gilmour S, Ota E, Momose Y, Onishi T, Bilano VL, Kasuga F, Sekizaki T, Shibuya K - Bull. World Health Organ. (2015)

Estimates of the incidence of foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter, Salmonella or enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Japan, 2011
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581658&req=5

Figure 2: Estimates of the incidence of foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter, Salmonella or enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Japan, 2011
Mentions: Table 1 shows the incidence of gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Campylobacter, Salmonella or EHEC reported in the routine surveillance data, and the corresponding – much higher – adjusted incidences that we estimated using the pyramid reconstruction method. Fig. 2 shows the estimated annual incidence of acute gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Campylobacter, Salmonella or EHEC between 1996 or 1999 and 2011. Over this period, there was no clear trend in the incidence of acute gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Campylobacter or EHEC but the incidence of gastroenteritis caused by foodborne Salmonella appeared to fall substantially after 2002.

Bottom Line: Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan .

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the burden posed by foodborne diseases in Japan using methods developed by the World Health Organization's Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG).

Methods: Expert consultation and statistics on food poisoning during 2011 were used to identify three common causes of foodborne disease in Japan: Campylobacter and Salmonella species and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). We conducted systematic reviews of English and Japanese literature on the complications caused by these pathogens, by searching Embase, the Japan medical society abstract database and Medline. We estimated the annual incidence of acute gastroenteritis from reported surveillance data, based on estimated probabilities that an affected person would visit a physician and have gastroenteritis confirmed. We then calculated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost in 2011, using the incidence estimates along with disability weights derived from published studies.

Findings: In 2011, foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter species, Salmonella species and EHEC led to an estimated loss of 6099, 3145 and 463 DALYs in Japan, respectively. These estimated burdens are based on the pyramid reconstruction method; are largely due to morbidity rather than mortality; and are much higher than those indicated by routine surveillance data.

Conclusion: Routine surveillance data may indicate foodborne disease burdens that are much lower than the true values. Most of the burden posed by foodborne disease in Japan comes from secondary complications. The tools developed by FERG appear useful in estimating disease burdens and setting priorities in the field of food safety.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus