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National health accounts data from 1996 to 2010: a systematic review.

Bui AL, Lavado RF, Johnson EK, Brooks BP, Freeman MK, Graves CM, Haakenstad A, Shoemaker B, Hanlon M, Dieleman JL - Bull. World Health Organ. (2015)

Bottom Line: Most countries did not provide complete health expenditure data: only 252 of the 872 reports contained data in all four types.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, 2301 5th Avenue, Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98121, United States of America (USA).

ABSTRACT

Objective: To collect, compile and evaluate publicly available national health accounts (NHA) reports produced worldwide between 1996 and 2010.

Methods: We downloaded country-generated NHA reports from the World Health Organization global health expenditure database and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) StatExtract website. We also obtained reports from Abt Associates, through contacts in individual countries and through an online search. We compiled data in the four main types used in these reports: (i) financing source; (ii) financing agent; (iii) health function; and (iv) health provider. We combined and adjusted data to conform with OECD's first edition of A system of health accounts manual, (2000).

Findings: We identified 872 NHA reports from 117 countries containing a total of 2936 matrices for the four data types. Most countries did not provide complete health expenditure data: only 252 of the 872 reports contained data in all four types. Thirty-eight countries reported an average not-specified-by-kind value greater than 20% for all data types and years. Some countries reported substantial year-on-year changes in both the level and composition of health expenditure that were probably produced by data-generation processes. All study data are publicly available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/nha/.

Conclusion: Data from NHA reports on health expenditure are often incomplete and, in some cases, of questionable quality. Better data would help finance ministries allocate resources to health systems, assist health ministries in allocating capital within the health sector and enable researchers to make accurate comparisons between health systems.

No MeSH data available.


National health accounts reports and data type matrices available, by country income group,a 1996–2010
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Figure 1: National health accounts reports and data type matrices available, by country income group,a 1996–2010

Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the number of NHA reports and type matrices produced by countries in different income categories (as defined by the World Bank23 and assigned historically for each country and year) as a percentage of the maximum possible: the maximum number of reports that could have been available for each country was 15 (i.e. one for each year from 1996 to 2010) and the maximum number of type matrices was 60 (i.e. four in each of 15 years). High-income countries belonging to the OECD produced most NHAs: the median proportion of reports available for these countries was 100% and the median proportion of matrices available was 98%. In contrast, non-OECD, high-income countries typically produced no reports and only a few matrices. The interquartile ranges in the box plots in Fig. 1 show that the number of reports available was lowest for lower-middleincome and low-income countries. Despite having fewer resources, low-income countries produced a comparable number (average of 1.88 reports per country, across all years) of reports to middle-income countries (average of 1.86 reports per country, across all years). For upper-middle income and lower-middle income countries, the median number of tables reported over the 15-year period was 0. Out of the 193 United Nations’ Members States, 76 Member States did not produce any reports; 57% of these countries were classified as upper-middle income or lower-middle income. Fig. 2 shows the number of NHA reports and type matrices produced by countries in different geographical areas: the numbers were lowest for countries in areas of the Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and sub-Saharan Africa.


National health accounts data from 1996 to 2010: a systematic review.

Bui AL, Lavado RF, Johnson EK, Brooks BP, Freeman MK, Graves CM, Haakenstad A, Shoemaker B, Hanlon M, Dieleman JL - Bull. World Health Organ. (2015)

National health accounts reports and data type matrices available, by country income group,a 1996–2010
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581653&req=5

Figure 1: National health accounts reports and data type matrices available, by country income group,a 1996–2010
Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the number of NHA reports and type matrices produced by countries in different income categories (as defined by the World Bank23 and assigned historically for each country and year) as a percentage of the maximum possible: the maximum number of reports that could have been available for each country was 15 (i.e. one for each year from 1996 to 2010) and the maximum number of type matrices was 60 (i.e. four in each of 15 years). High-income countries belonging to the OECD produced most NHAs: the median proportion of reports available for these countries was 100% and the median proportion of matrices available was 98%. In contrast, non-OECD, high-income countries typically produced no reports and only a few matrices. The interquartile ranges in the box plots in Fig. 1 show that the number of reports available was lowest for lower-middleincome and low-income countries. Despite having fewer resources, low-income countries produced a comparable number (average of 1.88 reports per country, across all years) of reports to middle-income countries (average of 1.86 reports per country, across all years). For upper-middle income and lower-middle income countries, the median number of tables reported over the 15-year period was 0. Out of the 193 United Nations’ Members States, 76 Member States did not produce any reports; 57% of these countries were classified as upper-middle income or lower-middle income. Fig. 2 shows the number of NHA reports and type matrices produced by countries in different geographical areas: the numbers were lowest for countries in areas of the Eastern Mediterranean and North Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean, and sub-Saharan Africa.

Bottom Line: Most countries did not provide complete health expenditure data: only 252 of the 872 reports contained data in all four types.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, 2301 5th Avenue, Suite 600, Seattle, WA 98121, United States of America (USA).

ABSTRACT

Objective: To collect, compile and evaluate publicly available national health accounts (NHA) reports produced worldwide between 1996 and 2010.

Methods: We downloaded country-generated NHA reports from the World Health Organization global health expenditure database and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) StatExtract website. We also obtained reports from Abt Associates, through contacts in individual countries and through an online search. We compiled data in the four main types used in these reports: (i) financing source; (ii) financing agent; (iii) health function; and (iv) health provider. We combined and adjusted data to conform with OECD's first edition of A system of health accounts manual, (2000).

Findings: We identified 872 NHA reports from 117 countries containing a total of 2936 matrices for the four data types. Most countries did not provide complete health expenditure data: only 252 of the 872 reports contained data in all four types. Thirty-eight countries reported an average not-specified-by-kind value greater than 20% for all data types and years. Some countries reported substantial year-on-year changes in both the level and composition of health expenditure that were probably produced by data-generation processes. All study data are publicly available at http://vizhub.healthdata.org/nha/.

Conclusion: Data from NHA reports on health expenditure are often incomplete and, in some cases, of questionable quality. Better data would help finance ministries allocate resources to health systems, assist health ministries in allocating capital within the health sector and enable researchers to make accurate comparisons between health systems.

No MeSH data available.