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Road traffic crashes, injury and fatality trends in Sri Lanka: 1938-2013.

Dharmaratne SD, Jayatilleke AU, Jayatilleke AC - Bull. World Health Organ. (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, insurance policies that did not require a police report to claim may have led to underreporting of crashes and allowed drivers to avoid prosecution.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Community Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka .

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyse trends in road traffic crashes, injuries and fatalities over 75 years in Sri Lanka.

Methods: Data on road traffic crashes, injuries and fatalities between 1938 and 2013 were obtained from the Police Statistics Unit. Rates per 100,000 population were calculated and trends were analysed using joinpoint regression analysis.

Findings: Road traffic crashes and injuries rose substantially between 1938 and 2013: annual crashes increased from 61.2 to 183.6 per 100,000 people; injuries, from 35.1 to 98.6 per 100,000; and fatalities, from 3.0 to 10.8 per 100,000 people per year. Joinpoint analysis showed large fluctuations in crashes and injuries over time but the fatalities rose almost continuously. These fluctuations paralleled the country's political and economic development. In some years, better traffic law enforcement and improved public transportation may have been associated with reduced crashes and injuries, whereas rapid growth in vehicle numbers, especially two- and three-wheeled vehicles, may have contributed to increased crashes and injuries. In addition, insurance policies that did not require a police report to claim may have led to underreporting of crashes and allowed drivers to avoid prosecution.

Conclusion: Fluctuations over time in road traffic crashes and injuries in Sri Lanka are associated with changes in political, economic and traffic policy. There is potential for reducing road traffic crashes and injuries through better traffic law enforcement, restrictions on the importation of two- and three-wheeled vehicles and policies to improve road safety and prevent underreporting of crashes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Road traffic injuries, Sri Lanka, 1938–2013
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Figure 2: Road traffic injuries, Sri Lanka, 1938–2013

Mentions: Fig. 2 shows the incidence of road traffic injuries between 1938 and 2013. Over the period, it increased from 35.1 to 98.6 per 100 000 population. The model of best fit had two joinpoints, in 1959 and 1967, respectively (Table 2). The road traffic injury rate increased until 1959 (to 92.5 per 100 000 population), decreased from 1959 to 1967 (to 58.1 per 100 000 population) and then increased again until 2013. However, during the latter half of the study period, annual rates deviated substantially from the trend line.


Road traffic crashes, injury and fatality trends in Sri Lanka: 1938-2013.

Dharmaratne SD, Jayatilleke AU, Jayatilleke AC - Bull. World Health Organ. (2015)

Road traffic injuries, Sri Lanka, 1938–2013
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581645&req=5

Figure 2: Road traffic injuries, Sri Lanka, 1938–2013
Mentions: Fig. 2 shows the incidence of road traffic injuries between 1938 and 2013. Over the period, it increased from 35.1 to 98.6 per 100 000 population. The model of best fit had two joinpoints, in 1959 and 1967, respectively (Table 2). The road traffic injury rate increased until 1959 (to 92.5 per 100 000 population), decreased from 1959 to 1967 (to 58.1 per 100 000 population) and then increased again until 2013. However, during the latter half of the study period, annual rates deviated substantially from the trend line.

Bottom Line: In addition, insurance policies that did not require a police report to claim may have led to underreporting of crashes and allowed drivers to avoid prosecution.Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Community Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka .

ABSTRACT

Objective: To analyse trends in road traffic crashes, injuries and fatalities over 75 years in Sri Lanka.

Methods: Data on road traffic crashes, injuries and fatalities between 1938 and 2013 were obtained from the Police Statistics Unit. Rates per 100,000 population were calculated and trends were analysed using joinpoint regression analysis.

Findings: Road traffic crashes and injuries rose substantially between 1938 and 2013: annual crashes increased from 61.2 to 183.6 per 100,000 people; injuries, from 35.1 to 98.6 per 100,000; and fatalities, from 3.0 to 10.8 per 100,000 people per year. Joinpoint analysis showed large fluctuations in crashes and injuries over time but the fatalities rose almost continuously. These fluctuations paralleled the country's political and economic development. In some years, better traffic law enforcement and improved public transportation may have been associated with reduced crashes and injuries, whereas rapid growth in vehicle numbers, especially two- and three-wheeled vehicles, may have contributed to increased crashes and injuries. In addition, insurance policies that did not require a police report to claim may have led to underreporting of crashes and allowed drivers to avoid prosecution.

Conclusion: Fluctuations over time in road traffic crashes and injuries in Sri Lanka are associated with changes in political, economic and traffic policy. There is potential for reducing road traffic crashes and injuries through better traffic law enforcement, restrictions on the importation of two- and three-wheeled vehicles and policies to improve road safety and prevent underreporting of crashes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus