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Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process.

Liu S, Erkkinen MG, Healey ML, Xu Y, Swett KE, Chow HM, Braun AR - Hum Brain Mapp (2015)

Bottom Line: Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process.Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control.Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Language Section, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 20892.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Distinct associations between linguistic creativity ratings and connectivity patterns in experts and novices.(A) An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model was used to examine group differences in the way linguistic creativity scores were correlated with functional connections in experts and novices. In experts, linguistic creativity scores were more weakly correlated with the strength of functional connections between sensorimotor (somatosensory, premotor and auditory) areas and the DLPFC (indicated by blue lines, see an example in Fig. 7B) while these scores were more strongly correlated with the strength of functional connection between sensorimotor area and the left orbitofrontal cortex (indicated by the red line) (FDR < 0.05 in each instance). (B) The relationship between ICs 31 and 19 is used to illustrate an instance in which linguistic creativity scores and functional connections between ICs were more weakly correlated in experts than in novices. The correlation (slope of the linear fit) between LC and Fisher's z’ transformed correlation coefficient (of IC 31 and 19) is significantly less (P = 0.002, FDR = 0.04) in experts (purple: y = −2.02 × x + 2.82, P = 0.02) than in novices (green: y = 1.05 × x + 1.47, P = 0.0009). A1, primary auditory cortex; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; PCL, paracentral lobule; SMA, supplementary motor area; S1, primary somatosensory cortex.
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hbm22849-fig-0007: Distinct associations between linguistic creativity ratings and connectivity patterns in experts and novices.(A) An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model was used to examine group differences in the way linguistic creativity scores were correlated with functional connections in experts and novices. In experts, linguistic creativity scores were more weakly correlated with the strength of functional connections between sensorimotor (somatosensory, premotor and auditory) areas and the DLPFC (indicated by blue lines, see an example in Fig. 7B) while these scores were more strongly correlated with the strength of functional connection between sensorimotor area and the left orbitofrontal cortex (indicated by the red line) (FDR < 0.05 in each instance). (B) The relationship between ICs 31 and 19 is used to illustrate an instance in which linguistic creativity scores and functional connections between ICs were more weakly correlated in experts than in novices. The correlation (slope of the linear fit) between LC and Fisher's z’ transformed correlation coefficient (of IC 31 and 19) is significantly less (P = 0.002, FDR = 0.04) in experts (purple: y = −2.02 × x + 2.82, P = 0.02) than in novices (green: y = 1.05 × x + 1.47, P = 0.0009). A1, primary auditory cortex; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; PCL, paracentral lobule; SMA, supplementary motor area; S1, primary somatosensory cortex.

Mentions: Figure 7 illustrates that when poems with high LC scores were produced, functional connections between the DLPFC and sensorimotor (somatosensory, premotor, and auditory) areas were weaker in experts than in novices while the correlation between sensorimotor areas and the left orbitofrontal cortex was stronger.


Brain activity and connectivity during poetry composition: Toward a multidimensional model of the creative process.

Liu S, Erkkinen MG, Healey ML, Xu Y, Swett KE, Chow HM, Braun AR - Hum Brain Mapp (2015)

Distinct associations between linguistic creativity ratings and connectivity patterns in experts and novices.(A) An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model was used to examine group differences in the way linguistic creativity scores were correlated with functional connections in experts and novices. In experts, linguistic creativity scores were more weakly correlated with the strength of functional connections between sensorimotor (somatosensory, premotor and auditory) areas and the DLPFC (indicated by blue lines, see an example in Fig. 7B) while these scores were more strongly correlated with the strength of functional connection between sensorimotor area and the left orbitofrontal cortex (indicated by the red line) (FDR < 0.05 in each instance). (B) The relationship between ICs 31 and 19 is used to illustrate an instance in which linguistic creativity scores and functional connections between ICs were more weakly correlated in experts than in novices. The correlation (slope of the linear fit) between LC and Fisher's z’ transformed correlation coefficient (of IC 31 and 19) is significantly less (P = 0.002, FDR = 0.04) in experts (purple: y = −2.02 × x + 2.82, P = 0.02) than in novices (green: y = 1.05 × x + 1.47, P = 0.0009). A1, primary auditory cortex; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; PCL, paracentral lobule; SMA, supplementary motor area; S1, primary somatosensory cortex.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy-nc-nd
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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hbm22849-fig-0007: Distinct associations between linguistic creativity ratings and connectivity patterns in experts and novices.(A) An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model was used to examine group differences in the way linguistic creativity scores were correlated with functional connections in experts and novices. In experts, linguistic creativity scores were more weakly correlated with the strength of functional connections between sensorimotor (somatosensory, premotor and auditory) areas and the DLPFC (indicated by blue lines, see an example in Fig. 7B) while these scores were more strongly correlated with the strength of functional connection between sensorimotor area and the left orbitofrontal cortex (indicated by the red line) (FDR < 0.05 in each instance). (B) The relationship between ICs 31 and 19 is used to illustrate an instance in which linguistic creativity scores and functional connections between ICs were more weakly correlated in experts than in novices. The correlation (slope of the linear fit) between LC and Fisher's z’ transformed correlation coefficient (of IC 31 and 19) is significantly less (P = 0.002, FDR = 0.04) in experts (purple: y = −2.02 × x + 2.82, P = 0.02) than in novices (green: y = 1.05 × x + 1.47, P = 0.0009). A1, primary auditory cortex; OFC, orbitofrontal cortex; PCL, paracentral lobule; SMA, supplementary motor area; S1, primary somatosensory cortex.
Mentions: Figure 7 illustrates that when poems with high LC scores were produced, functional connections between the DLPFC and sensorimotor (somatosensory, premotor, and auditory) areas were weaker in experts than in novices while the correlation between sensorimotor areas and the left orbitofrontal cortex was stronger.

Bottom Line: Distinct activation patterns were associated with generation and revision, two major phases of the creative process.Experts showed significantly stronger deactivation of DLPFC/IPS during generation, suggesting that they may more effectively suspend cognitive control.Quality of poetry, assessed by an independent panel, was associated with divergent connectivity patterns in experts and novices, centered upon MPFC (for technical facility) and DLPFC/IPS (for innovation), suggesting a mechanism by which experts produce higher quality poetry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Language Section, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, 20892.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus