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Differences of IL-1β Receptors Expression by Immunocompetent Cells Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Alshevskaya AA, Lopatnikova JA, Shkaruba NS, Chumasova OA, Sizikov AE, Karaulov AV, Kozlov VA, Sennikov SV - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Bottom Line: The effectiveness of the cytokine depends not only on the percentage of receptor-positive cells in an immunocompetent subset but also on the density of receptor expression.The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-1β membrane-bound receptors (IL-1R1 and IL-1R2) in terms of the percentage of receptor-positive cells and the number of receptors per cell in different subsets of immune cells in RA patients before and after a course of basic (excluding anticytokine) therapy and in healthy individuals.The importance of determining both the relative percentage of cells expressing receptors to immunomodulatory cytokines and the number of membrane-bound receptors per cell is highlighted by evidence of unidirectional or multidirectional changing of these parameters according to cell subset and health status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution "Research Institute of Fundamental and Clinical Immunology", Yadrintsevskaya Street 14, Novosibirsk 630099, Russia.

ABSTRACT
IL-1β is involved in the induction and maintenance of chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Its activity is regulated and induced by soluble and membrane-bound receptors, respectively. The effectiveness of the cytokine depends not only on the percentage of receptor-positive cells in an immunocompetent subset but also on the density of receptor expression. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-1β membrane-bound receptors (IL-1R1 and IL-1R2) in terms of the percentage of receptor-positive cells and the number of receptors per cell in different subsets of immune cells in RA patients before and after a course of basic (excluding anticytokine) therapy and in healthy individuals. The resulting data indicate differences in the expression of IL-1β receptors among T cells, B cells, and monocytes in healthy volunteers and in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The importance of determining both the relative percentage of cells expressing receptors to immunomodulatory cytokines and the number of membrane-bound receptors per cell is highlighted by evidence of unidirectional or multidirectional changing of these parameters according to cell subset and health status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of cells expressing IL-1R1 and IL-1R2 in PBMC populations derived from healthy individuals (n = 15) and RA patients in the acute phase (n = 33) and after response to treatment (n = 21). The data are presented as the median and interquartile range. The arrows denote significance of intergroup differences, p < 0.05: black ones, between the studied groups; grey ones, between the subsets.
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fig1: Percentage of cells expressing IL-1R1 and IL-1R2 in PBMC populations derived from healthy individuals (n = 15) and RA patients in the acute phase (n = 33) and after response to treatment (n = 21). The data are presented as the median and interquartile range. The arrows denote significance of intergroup differences, p < 0.05: black ones, between the studied groups; grey ones, between the subsets.

Mentions: To study expression of membrane-bound receptors of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, which plays a key role in both the development and severity of the pathological process in RA, one needs to assess expression of types 1 and 2 receptors on cells involved in the pathology. The results of previous studies involving healthy individuals [23] demonstrate that there are differences both in the number of cells expressing IL-1 receptors types 1 and 2 and in the number of membrane-bound receptors on subpopulations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). However, the high percentage of receptor-expressing cells in subpopulations does not always associate with high receptor level, and vice versa. We selected three main subpopulations of peripheral blood immunocompetent cells: T cells (CD3+), B cells (CD19+), and monocytes (CD14+), because they are most actively involved in the systemic inflammatory response and also take part in local responses. We tested PBMCs derived from RA patients during the acute disease stage and after they had responded to therapy to study the features of the pathogenic process and the reaction of cytokine receptors expression to treatment. The percentage of cells carrying types 1 and 2 receptors was assessed in each subpopulation (Figure 1) and the number of membrane-bound receptors on cells was calculated (Figure 2).


Differences of IL-1β Receptors Expression by Immunocompetent Cells Subsets in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Alshevskaya AA, Lopatnikova JA, Shkaruba NS, Chumasova OA, Sizikov AE, Karaulov AV, Kozlov VA, Sennikov SV - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Percentage of cells expressing IL-1R1 and IL-1R2 in PBMC populations derived from healthy individuals (n = 15) and RA patients in the acute phase (n = 33) and after response to treatment (n = 21). The data are presented as the median and interquartile range. The arrows denote significance of intergroup differences, p < 0.05: black ones, between the studied groups; grey ones, between the subsets.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581579&req=5

fig1: Percentage of cells expressing IL-1R1 and IL-1R2 in PBMC populations derived from healthy individuals (n = 15) and RA patients in the acute phase (n = 33) and after response to treatment (n = 21). The data are presented as the median and interquartile range. The arrows denote significance of intergroup differences, p < 0.05: black ones, between the studied groups; grey ones, between the subsets.
Mentions: To study expression of membrane-bound receptors of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, which plays a key role in both the development and severity of the pathological process in RA, one needs to assess expression of types 1 and 2 receptors on cells involved in the pathology. The results of previous studies involving healthy individuals [23] demonstrate that there are differences both in the number of cells expressing IL-1 receptors types 1 and 2 and in the number of membrane-bound receptors on subpopulations of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). However, the high percentage of receptor-expressing cells in subpopulations does not always associate with high receptor level, and vice versa. We selected three main subpopulations of peripheral blood immunocompetent cells: T cells (CD3+), B cells (CD19+), and monocytes (CD14+), because they are most actively involved in the systemic inflammatory response and also take part in local responses. We tested PBMCs derived from RA patients during the acute disease stage and after they had responded to therapy to study the features of the pathogenic process and the reaction of cytokine receptors expression to treatment. The percentage of cells carrying types 1 and 2 receptors was assessed in each subpopulation (Figure 1) and the number of membrane-bound receptors on cells was calculated (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The effectiveness of the cytokine depends not only on the percentage of receptor-positive cells in an immunocompetent subset but also on the density of receptor expression.The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-1β membrane-bound receptors (IL-1R1 and IL-1R2) in terms of the percentage of receptor-positive cells and the number of receptors per cell in different subsets of immune cells in RA patients before and after a course of basic (excluding anticytokine) therapy and in healthy individuals.The importance of determining both the relative percentage of cells expressing receptors to immunomodulatory cytokines and the number of membrane-bound receptors per cell is highlighted by evidence of unidirectional or multidirectional changing of these parameters according to cell subset and health status.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution "Research Institute of Fundamental and Clinical Immunology", Yadrintsevskaya Street 14, Novosibirsk 630099, Russia.

ABSTRACT
IL-1β is involved in the induction and maintenance of chronic inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Its activity is regulated and induced by soluble and membrane-bound receptors, respectively. The effectiveness of the cytokine depends not only on the percentage of receptor-positive cells in an immunocompetent subset but also on the density of receptor expression. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of IL-1β membrane-bound receptors (IL-1R1 and IL-1R2) in terms of the percentage of receptor-positive cells and the number of receptors per cell in different subsets of immune cells in RA patients before and after a course of basic (excluding anticytokine) therapy and in healthy individuals. The resulting data indicate differences in the expression of IL-1β receptors among T cells, B cells, and monocytes in healthy volunteers and in rheumatoid arthritis patients. The importance of determining both the relative percentage of cells expressing receptors to immunomodulatory cytokines and the number of membrane-bound receptors per cell is highlighted by evidence of unidirectional or multidirectional changing of these parameters according to cell subset and health status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus