Limits...
Effects of a Short Educational Program for the Prevention of Foot Ulcers in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Monami M, Zannoni S, Gaias M, Nreu B, Marchionni N, Mannucci E - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Bottom Line: Results.The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups.The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Geriatric Cardiology and Medicine, Careggi Teaching Hospital, 50141 Florence, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Background. Patient education is capable of reducing the risk for diabetic foot ulcers. However, specific education on foot ulcer prevention was either included in broader programs addressing different parts of diabetes care or provided with time- and resource-consuming curricula. The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a brief educational program for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. Methods. The study was performed on type 2 diabetic patients, randomized in a 1 : 1 ratio either to intervention or to control group. The principal endpoint was the incidence of foot ulcers. The intervention was a two-hour program provided to groups of 5-7 patients, including a 30-minute face-to-face lesson on risk factors for foot ulcers, and a 90-minute interactive session with practical exercises on behaviors for reducing risk. Results. The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups. The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012). Conclusions. A brief, 2-hour, focused educational program is effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier survival curves (patients free of event) for incidence of foot ulcers in intervention (grey line) and control (black line) groups. p = 0.012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581554&req=5

fig1: Kaplan-Meier survival curves (patients free of event) for incidence of foot ulcers in intervention (grey line) and control (black line) groups. p = 0.012.

Mentions: No amputation was reported in the sample enrolled. Two patients died during follow-up (one in the standard care and one in the interventional group); none of them had developed ulcers, and they were included in the analysis until death. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012; Figure 1). Questionnaire scores improved significantly after intervention (20 [16; 22] versus 23 [21; 24], p < 0.001). No statistical difference in questionnaire score at baseline was detected between the two groups.


Effects of a Short Educational Program for the Prevention of Foot Ulcers in High-Risk Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Monami M, Zannoni S, Gaias M, Nreu B, Marchionni N, Mannucci E - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Kaplan-Meier survival curves (patients free of event) for incidence of foot ulcers in intervention (grey line) and control (black line) groups. p = 0.012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581554&req=5

fig1: Kaplan-Meier survival curves (patients free of event) for incidence of foot ulcers in intervention (grey line) and control (black line) groups. p = 0.012.
Mentions: No amputation was reported in the sample enrolled. Two patients died during follow-up (one in the standard care and one in the interventional group); none of them had developed ulcers, and they were included in the analysis until death. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012; Figure 1). Questionnaire scores improved significantly after intervention (20 [16; 22] versus 23 [21; 24], p < 0.001). No statistical difference in questionnaire score at baseline was detected between the two groups.

Bottom Line: Results.The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups.The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Geriatric Cardiology and Medicine, Careggi Teaching Hospital, 50141 Florence, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Background. Patient education is capable of reducing the risk for diabetic foot ulcers. However, specific education on foot ulcer prevention was either included in broader programs addressing different parts of diabetes care or provided with time- and resource-consuming curricula. The aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and efficacy of a brief educational program for the prevention of diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients. Methods. The study was performed on type 2 diabetic patients, randomized in a 1 : 1 ratio either to intervention or to control group. The principal endpoint was the incidence of foot ulcers. The intervention was a two-hour program provided to groups of 5-7 patients, including a 30-minute face-to-face lesson on risk factors for foot ulcers, and a 90-minute interactive session with practical exercises on behaviors for reducing risk. Results. The study was prematurely terminated due to a highly significant difference in outcome between the two treatment groups. The final sample was therefore composed of 121 patients. Six patients, all in the control group, developed ulcers during the 6-month follow-up (10% versus 0%, p = 0.012). Conclusions. A brief, 2-hour, focused educational program is effective in preventing diabetic foot ulcers in high-risk patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus