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The Impact of Intravenous Lidocaine on ICP in Neurological Illness: A Systematic Review.

Zeiler FA, Sader N, Kazina CJ - Crit Care Res Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: Three studies focused on a therapeutic administration of IV lidocaine in order to determine ICP reduction effects.All therapeutic studies displayed a reduction in ICP.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, GB1-820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3A 1R9.

ABSTRACT
Background. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that intravenous (IV) lidocaine had on ICP in patients with neurological illness. Methods. All articles are from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to March 2015). The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and GRADE methodology. Results. Ten original articles were considered for the final review. There were 189 patients studied. Seven studies focused on prophylactic pretreatment with IV lidocaine to determine if there would be an attenuation of ICP spikes during stimulation, with 4 displaying an attenuation of ICP. Three studies focused on a therapeutic administration of IV lidocaine in order to determine ICP reduction effects. All therapeutic studies displayed a reduction in ICP. Conclusions. We cannot make a strong definitive recommendation on the effectiveness of IV lidocaine on the attenuation of ICP spikes during stimulation. There currently exists both Oxford 2b and GRADE B literature to support and refute the attenuation of ICP spikes with IV lidocaine during stimulation. There currently exists Oxford 2b, GRADE B evidence to support ICP reduction with lidocaine when used as a therapeutic agent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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fig1: Flow diagram of search results.

Mentions: The results of the search strategy across all databases and other sources are summarized in Figure 1. Overall a total of 470 articles were identified, with 466 from the database search and 4 from the search of published meeting proceedings. A total of 56 were removed due to duplication of reference, leaving 414 to review. By applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria to the title and abstract of these articles, we identified 39 articles that fit these criteria. An additional 1 article was added from reference sections of pertinent review articles, leaving a total of 40 full manuscripts to review. Of the 40 identified, 36 were from the database search and 4 were from published meeting proceedings. Applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria to the full text documents, only 11 articles were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, with 8 from database and 3 from meeting proceeding sources. The 29 articles that were excluded were done so because either they did not report details around IV lidocaine administration, there was no documentation of ICP, they were review articles, or they were nonrelevant basic science articles.


The Impact of Intravenous Lidocaine on ICP in Neurological Illness: A Systematic Review.

Zeiler FA, Sader N, Kazina CJ - Crit Care Res Pract (2015)

Flow diagram of search results.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581506&req=5

fig1: Flow diagram of search results.
Mentions: The results of the search strategy across all databases and other sources are summarized in Figure 1. Overall a total of 470 articles were identified, with 466 from the database search and 4 from the search of published meeting proceedings. A total of 56 were removed due to duplication of reference, leaving 414 to review. By applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria to the title and abstract of these articles, we identified 39 articles that fit these criteria. An additional 1 article was added from reference sections of pertinent review articles, leaving a total of 40 full manuscripts to review. Of the 40 identified, 36 were from the database search and 4 were from published meeting proceedings. Applying the inclusion/exclusion criteria to the full text documents, only 11 articles were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review, with 8 from database and 3 from meeting proceeding sources. The 29 articles that were excluded were done so because either they did not report details around IV lidocaine administration, there was no documentation of ICP, they were review articles, or they were nonrelevant basic science articles.

Bottom Line: Three studies focused on a therapeutic administration of IV lidocaine in order to determine ICP reduction effects.All therapeutic studies displayed a reduction in ICP.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, GB1-820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3A 1R9.

ABSTRACT
Background. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to determine the effect that intravenous (IV) lidocaine had on ICP in patients with neurological illness. Methods. All articles are from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (inception to March 2015). The strength of evidence was adjudicated using both the Oxford and GRADE methodology. Results. Ten original articles were considered for the final review. There were 189 patients studied. Seven studies focused on prophylactic pretreatment with IV lidocaine to determine if there would be an attenuation of ICP spikes during stimulation, with 4 displaying an attenuation of ICP. Three studies focused on a therapeutic administration of IV lidocaine in order to determine ICP reduction effects. All therapeutic studies displayed a reduction in ICP. Conclusions. We cannot make a strong definitive recommendation on the effectiveness of IV lidocaine on the attenuation of ICP spikes during stimulation. There currently exists both Oxford 2b and GRADE B literature to support and refute the attenuation of ICP spikes with IV lidocaine during stimulation. There currently exists Oxford 2b, GRADE B evidence to support ICP reduction with lidocaine when used as a therapeutic agent.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus