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Specific antenatal interventions for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) pregnant women at high risk of poor birth outcomes in the United Kingdom: a scoping review.

Garcia R, Ali N, Papadopoulos C, Randhawa G - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2015)

Bottom Line: Disparity exists in maternal and infant birth outcomes of Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) women giving birth in the United Kingdom (UK) compared to the majority.The included interventions employed sample sizes of N = 160-1441, examined a range of different outcome measures and were delivered across different parts of the UK with high numbers of BAME residents.There is a lack of rigorous research interventions and practice interventions which are currently documented, of specific maternity interventions which are aimed to address culturally competent maternity services and the sharing of best practice addressing the increased risks of BAME women delivering in the UK.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute For Health Research, University of Bedfordshire, Putteridge Bury, Hitchin Road, Luton, Bedfordshire, LU2 8LE, UK. Rebecca.Garcia@beds.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disparity exists in maternal and infant birth outcomes of Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) women giving birth in the United Kingdom (UK) compared to the majority. There is therefore a need to reconsider existing maternity service provision to ensure culturally competent services. The purpose of this scoping review was to ascertain what specific maternity interventions have been implemented in the UK for BAME women (2004-2014) so that increased awareness of the need and scope of specific maternity interventions for BAME women can be identified.

Methods: A scoping review was conducted in order to determine the evidence base. It was determined that no prior systematic reviews had been conducted and it was apparent that literature in this field was sparse. Scoping review is an ideal method when literature is likely to be heterogeneous and the research field relatively unexplored. A keyword strategy was used implementing population (P), intervention (I), comparison (C) and outcomes (O).

Results: An initial 2188 papers were identified. Following screening and review, only 5 heterogeneous papers remained suitable and were included. The included interventions employed sample sizes of N = 160-1441, examined a range of different outcome measures and were delivered across different parts of the UK with high numbers of BAME residents.

Conclusions: There is a lack of rigorous research interventions and practice interventions which are currently documented, of specific maternity interventions which are aimed to address culturally competent maternity services and the sharing of best practice addressing the increased risks of BAME women delivering in the UK.

No MeSH data available.


Flow diagram of study review and selection process
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Flow diagram of study review and selection process

Mentions: After identification of 2188 initial studies, 487 duplicates were removed. One reviewer (RG) undertook initial screening of 1701 identified papers by title and abstract, following the inclusion and exclusion criteria. This resulted in removal of 1694 papers, many of which were either not intervention studies at all, or had not been conducted in the U.K. (the vast majority of the initial identified studies were HIV related and based in the African continent) or were not specific to the maternity population. This left 7 studies. In addition, manual searches identified a further 2 papers and 6 agencies were contact for details of service evaluations (as per the grey literature inclusion criteria). However, only two agencies responded (Haalma, Leeds NHS Trust and Yorkshire and Humber Innovation Education Cluster; Maternal and Infant Health Team). This resulted in 11 identified papers for a more detailed review. The selection process is depicted in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Specific antenatal interventions for Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) pregnant women at high risk of poor birth outcomes in the United Kingdom: a scoping review.

Garcia R, Ali N, Papadopoulos C, Randhawa G - BMC Pregnancy Childbirth (2015)

Flow diagram of study review and selection process
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581493&req=5

Fig1: Flow diagram of study review and selection process
Mentions: After identification of 2188 initial studies, 487 duplicates were removed. One reviewer (RG) undertook initial screening of 1701 identified papers by title and abstract, following the inclusion and exclusion criteria. This resulted in removal of 1694 papers, many of which were either not intervention studies at all, or had not been conducted in the U.K. (the vast majority of the initial identified studies were HIV related and based in the African continent) or were not specific to the maternity population. This left 7 studies. In addition, manual searches identified a further 2 papers and 6 agencies were contact for details of service evaluations (as per the grey literature inclusion criteria). However, only two agencies responded (Haalma, Leeds NHS Trust and Yorkshire and Humber Innovation Education Cluster; Maternal and Infant Health Team). This resulted in 11 identified papers for a more detailed review. The selection process is depicted in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Disparity exists in maternal and infant birth outcomes of Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) women giving birth in the United Kingdom (UK) compared to the majority.The included interventions employed sample sizes of N = 160-1441, examined a range of different outcome measures and were delivered across different parts of the UK with high numbers of BAME residents.There is a lack of rigorous research interventions and practice interventions which are currently documented, of specific maternity interventions which are aimed to address culturally competent maternity services and the sharing of best practice addressing the increased risks of BAME women delivering in the UK.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Institute For Health Research, University of Bedfordshire, Putteridge Bury, Hitchin Road, Luton, Bedfordshire, LU2 8LE, UK. Rebecca.Garcia@beds.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Disparity exists in maternal and infant birth outcomes of Black and Minority Ethnic (BAME) women giving birth in the United Kingdom (UK) compared to the majority. There is therefore a need to reconsider existing maternity service provision to ensure culturally competent services. The purpose of this scoping review was to ascertain what specific maternity interventions have been implemented in the UK for BAME women (2004-2014) so that increased awareness of the need and scope of specific maternity interventions for BAME women can be identified.

Methods: A scoping review was conducted in order to determine the evidence base. It was determined that no prior systematic reviews had been conducted and it was apparent that literature in this field was sparse. Scoping review is an ideal method when literature is likely to be heterogeneous and the research field relatively unexplored. A keyword strategy was used implementing population (P), intervention (I), comparison (C) and outcomes (O).

Results: An initial 2188 papers were identified. Following screening and review, only 5 heterogeneous papers remained suitable and were included. The included interventions employed sample sizes of N = 160-1441, examined a range of different outcome measures and were delivered across different parts of the UK with high numbers of BAME residents.

Conclusions: There is a lack of rigorous research interventions and practice interventions which are currently documented, of specific maternity interventions which are aimed to address culturally competent maternity services and the sharing of best practice addressing the increased risks of BAME women delivering in the UK.

No MeSH data available.