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Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

Qiu Y, De Hert K, Van Reeth K - Vet. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation.In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype.We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820, Merelbeke, Belgium. yu.qiu@ugent.be.

ABSTRACT
Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Genetic constellations of the five viruses used in this study. Abbreviations: PB2, polymerase basic 2; PB1, polymerase basic 1; PA, polymerase acidic; HA, hemagglutinin; NP, nucleoprotein; NA, neuraminidase; M, matrix; NS, nonstructural; TRIG, triple-reassortant internal genes, which are derived from swine (M, NS and NP), human (PB1) and avian (PB2 and PA) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved in North American swine influenza viruses.
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Fig1: Genetic constellations of the five viruses used in this study. Abbreviations: PB2, polymerase basic 2; PB1, polymerase basic 1; PA, polymerase acidic; HA, hemagglutinin; NP, nucleoprotein; NA, neuraminidase; M, matrix; NS, nonstructural; TRIG, triple-reassortant internal genes, which are derived from swine (M, NS and NP), human (PB1) and avian (PB2 and PA) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved in North American swine influenza viruses.

Mentions: Viruses for pig inoculation were propagated in embryonated chicken eggs and used at the third or fourth passage. Their genetic constellations are shown in Figure 1. A/California/04/09 is a representative pH1N1, while sw/Gent/28/10 (H1N1), sw/Gent/26/12 (H1N2) and sw/Gent/172/08 (H3N2) are representative for SIVs that are enzootic in Western Europe. Sw/Côtes d’Armor/0046/08 is an occasionally reported reassortant H1N1 (rH1N1) SIV with the H1 derived from the European H1N2 SIV lineage and the N1 from the European H1N1 lineage [20].Figure 1


Cross-protection against European swine influenza viruses in the context of infection immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus: studies in the pig model of influenza.

Qiu Y, De Hert K, Van Reeth K - Vet. Res. (2015)

Genetic constellations of the five viruses used in this study. Abbreviations: PB2, polymerase basic 2; PB1, polymerase basic 1; PA, polymerase acidic; HA, hemagglutinin; NP, nucleoprotein; NA, neuraminidase; M, matrix; NS, nonstructural; TRIG, triple-reassortant internal genes, which are derived from swine (M, NS and NP), human (PB1) and avian (PB2 and PA) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved in North American swine influenza viruses.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581489&req=5

Fig1: Genetic constellations of the five viruses used in this study. Abbreviations: PB2, polymerase basic 2; PB1, polymerase basic 1; PA, polymerase acidic; HA, hemagglutinin; NP, nucleoprotein; NA, neuraminidase; M, matrix; NS, nonstructural; TRIG, triple-reassortant internal genes, which are derived from swine (M, NS and NP), human (PB1) and avian (PB2 and PA) influenza viruses forming a constellation of genes that is well conserved in North American swine influenza viruses.
Mentions: Viruses for pig inoculation were propagated in embryonated chicken eggs and used at the third or fourth passage. Their genetic constellations are shown in Figure 1. A/California/04/09 is a representative pH1N1, while sw/Gent/28/10 (H1N1), sw/Gent/26/12 (H1N2) and sw/Gent/172/08 (H3N2) are representative for SIVs that are enzootic in Western Europe. Sw/Côtes d’Armor/0046/08 is an occasionally reported reassortant H1N1 (rH1N1) SIV with the H1 derived from the European H1N2 SIV lineage and the N1 from the European H1N1 lineage [20].Figure 1

Bottom Line: Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation.In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype.We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Salisburylaan 133, B-9820, Merelbeke, Belgium. yu.qiu@ugent.be.

ABSTRACT
Pigs are natural hosts for the same influenza virus subtypes as humans and are a valuable model for cross-protection studies with influenza. In this study, we have used the pig model to examine the extent of virological protection between a) the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus and three different European H1 swine influenza virus (SIV) lineages, and b) these H1 viruses and a European H3N2 SIV. Pigs were inoculated intranasally with representative strains of each virus lineage with 6- and 17-week intervals between H1 inoculations and between H1 and H3 inoculations, respectively. Virus titers in nasal swabs and/or tissues of the respiratory tract were determined after each inoculation. There was substantial though differing cross-protection between pH1N1 and other H1 viruses, which was directly correlated with the relatedness in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins. Cross-protection against H3N2 was almost complete in pigs with immunity against H1N2, but was weak in H1N1/pH1N1-immune pigs. In conclusion, infection with a live, wild type influenza virus may offer substantial cross-lineage protection against viruses of the same HA and/or NA subtype. True heterosubtypic protection, in contrast, appears to be minimal in natural influenza virus hosts. We discuss our findings in the light of the zoonotic and pandemic risks of SIVs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus