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Optimizing the process of nucleofection for professional antigen presenting cells.

Mullins CS, Wegner T, Klar E, Classen CF, Linnebacher M - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, we compared B cells to DC with regard to nucleofection efficiency and intensity of resulting antigen expression.And no differences with regard to nucleofectability were observed between the two cell types.Using IVT mRNA omits the danger of genomic integration and plasmid DNA constructs permit a more potent and longer lasting antigen expression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Oncology and Immunotherapy, Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Rostock, Schillingallee 35, 18057, Rostock, Germany. christina.mullins@uni-rostock.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: In times of rapidly increasing numbers of immunological approaches entering the clinics, antigen delivery becomes a pivotal process. The genuine way of rendering antigen presenting cells (APC) antigen specific, largely influences the outcome of the immune response. Short peptides bear the demerit of HLA restriction, whereas the proper way of delivery for long peptide sequences is currently a matter of debate. Electroporation is a reliable method for antigen delivery, especially using nucleic acids. The nucleofection process is based on this approach with the twist of further ensuring delivery also into the nucleus. Beside the form of antigen, the type of APC used for immune response induction may be crucial. Dendritic cells (DC) are by far the most commonly used APC; however B cells have entered this field as well and have gained wide acceptance.

Results: In this study, we compared B cells to DC with regard to nucleofection efficiency and intensity of resulting antigen expression. APC were transfected either with plasmid DNA containing the reporter gene green fluorescent protein (GFP) or directly with in vitro-transcribed (IVT) GPF mRNA as a surrogate antigen. Out of nearly 100 different nucleofection programs tested, the top five for each cell type were identified and validated using cells from cancer patients. Flow cytometric analyses of transfected cells determining GFP expression and viability revealed a reverse correlation of efficiency and viability. Finally, donor dependant variances were analyzed.

Conclusion: In summary, nucleofection of both DC and B cells is feasible with plasmid DNA and IVT mRNA. And no differences with regard to nucleofectability were observed between the two cell types. Using IVT mRNA omits the danger of genomic integration and plasmid DNA constructs permit a more potent and longer lasting antigen expression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Top 5 B cell nucleofection programs. The percentage of GFP positive cells (green) as well as viability (blue) of B cells with plasmid DNA for the five most potent nucleofection programs are represented, the average percentage (+standard deviation) for three cancer patients is given
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Fig4: Top 5 B cell nucleofection programs. The percentage of GFP positive cells (green) as well as viability (blue) of B cells with plasmid DNA for the five most potent nucleofection programs are represented, the average percentage (+standard deviation) for three cancer patients is given

Mentions: B cells have gained acceptance as APC, so we wanted to compare their nucleofectability to that of DC. A total of 81 programs (see Additional file 2: Table S1, Additional file 3: Table S2 for a detailed list of B cell lines and programs) was tested on an EBV immortalized B cell line (Bc ML) and the ten most effective programs were then verified using two further B cell lines (Bc WR and Bc 736). Nucleofection efficacy was comparable to that achieved with DC; it ranged from 32 % (±15) to 43 % (±7) with a mean viability rate of 53 % (Fig. 3). Since we aimed at transferring the process to patient derived B cell lines, the top five programs were selected taking nucleofection efficiency and viability into account and subsequently tested further on three patient derived B cell lines. Here, the efficacy ranged from 38 % (±19) to 52 % (±19) with a mean viability of 32 % (Fig. 4).Fig. 3


Optimizing the process of nucleofection for professional antigen presenting cells.

Mullins CS, Wegner T, Klar E, Classen CF, Linnebacher M - BMC Res Notes (2015)

Top 5 B cell nucleofection programs. The percentage of GFP positive cells (green) as well as viability (blue) of B cells with plasmid DNA for the five most potent nucleofection programs are represented, the average percentage (+standard deviation) for three cancer patients is given
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581479&req=5

Fig4: Top 5 B cell nucleofection programs. The percentage of GFP positive cells (green) as well as viability (blue) of B cells with plasmid DNA for the five most potent nucleofection programs are represented, the average percentage (+standard deviation) for three cancer patients is given
Mentions: B cells have gained acceptance as APC, so we wanted to compare their nucleofectability to that of DC. A total of 81 programs (see Additional file 2: Table S1, Additional file 3: Table S2 for a detailed list of B cell lines and programs) was tested on an EBV immortalized B cell line (Bc ML) and the ten most effective programs were then verified using two further B cell lines (Bc WR and Bc 736). Nucleofection efficacy was comparable to that achieved with DC; it ranged from 32 % (±15) to 43 % (±7) with a mean viability rate of 53 % (Fig. 3). Since we aimed at transferring the process to patient derived B cell lines, the top five programs were selected taking nucleofection efficiency and viability into account and subsequently tested further on three patient derived B cell lines. Here, the efficacy ranged from 38 % (±19) to 52 % (±19) with a mean viability of 32 % (Fig. 4).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: In this study, we compared B cells to DC with regard to nucleofection efficiency and intensity of resulting antigen expression.And no differences with regard to nucleofectability were observed between the two cell types.Using IVT mRNA omits the danger of genomic integration and plasmid DNA constructs permit a more potent and longer lasting antigen expression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Oncology and Immunotherapy, Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Rostock, Schillingallee 35, 18057, Rostock, Germany. christina.mullins@uni-rostock.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: In times of rapidly increasing numbers of immunological approaches entering the clinics, antigen delivery becomes a pivotal process. The genuine way of rendering antigen presenting cells (APC) antigen specific, largely influences the outcome of the immune response. Short peptides bear the demerit of HLA restriction, whereas the proper way of delivery for long peptide sequences is currently a matter of debate. Electroporation is a reliable method for antigen delivery, especially using nucleic acids. The nucleofection process is based on this approach with the twist of further ensuring delivery also into the nucleus. Beside the form of antigen, the type of APC used for immune response induction may be crucial. Dendritic cells (DC) are by far the most commonly used APC; however B cells have entered this field as well and have gained wide acceptance.

Results: In this study, we compared B cells to DC with regard to nucleofection efficiency and intensity of resulting antigen expression. APC were transfected either with plasmid DNA containing the reporter gene green fluorescent protein (GFP) or directly with in vitro-transcribed (IVT) GPF mRNA as a surrogate antigen. Out of nearly 100 different nucleofection programs tested, the top five for each cell type were identified and validated using cells from cancer patients. Flow cytometric analyses of transfected cells determining GFP expression and viability revealed a reverse correlation of efficiency and viability. Finally, donor dependant variances were analyzed.

Conclusion: In summary, nucleofection of both DC and B cells is feasible with plasmid DNA and IVT mRNA. And no differences with regard to nucleofectability were observed between the two cell types. Using IVT mRNA omits the danger of genomic integration and plasmid DNA constructs permit a more potent and longer lasting antigen expression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus