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Pathogens vectored by the tick, Dermacentor reticulatus, in endemic regions and zones of expansion in Poland.

Mierzejewska EJ, Pawełczyk A, Radkowski M, Welc-Falęciak R, Bajer A - Parasit Vectors (2015)

Bottom Line: RNA of the TBE virus was detected using RT-PCR and representative PCR products were sequenced and compared with sequences deposited in GenBank.Our study found significant differences between the range and prevalence of vectored pathogens in D. reticulatus from the endemic areas and newly inhabited expansion zones.The differences were likely associated with the different time of settlement or 'source' of ticks populations, the Eastern and the Western one.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Institute of Zoology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, 1 Miecznikowa Street, 02-096, Warsaw, Poland. e.mierzejewska@biol.uw.edu.pl.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dermacentor reticulatus plays an important role in the maintenance of pathogens of medical and veterinary importance in the environment. Currently two isolated populations of D. reticulatus are present in Poland--Western and Eastern. The range of the Eastern population covers endemic areas in eastern Poland but this population is expanding westwards creating an expansion zone in the centre of the country. The expansion zone in western Poland is occupied by the recently discovered Western population, spreading eastwards.

Methods: Questing adult ticks (n = 2585) were collected in 2012-2014 in endemic regions of north-eastern (Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodeship) and central Poland (Masovian Voivodeship) and in the expansion zones in central and western Poland, in the region between the Vistula River and the western border of the country. Amplification of Babesia, Rickettsia spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNAs was performed using specific starters. RNA of the TBE virus was detected using RT-PCR and representative PCR products were sequenced and compared with sequences deposited in GenBank.

Results: Of the total 2585 examined ticks, 1197 (46.3 %) were infected with at least one pathogen. Overall prevalence of pathogens was 4.18 % (108/2585) for Babesia spp., 44.10 % (1140/2585) for Rickettsia spp., 0.09 % (1/1107) for Borrelia afzelii and 7.6 % (7/92) for TBEV. Sequence analysis of DNA showed 99.86 % similarity to R. raoulti and 99.81 % to B. canis. One male from north-eastern Poland was infected with B. microti. Prevalence of R. raoulti was highest in the Western population (52.03 %) and lowest in the Eastern population in north-eastern Poland (34.18 %). Babesia canis was not detected in 592 ticks collected in the Western population, while in the Eastern population overall prevalence was 5.42 %. There were significant differences in the prevalence of B. canis between tick samples from northern (0.68 %), central (1.18 %) and southern (14.8 %) areas of the expansion zone in central Poland.

Conclusions: Our study found significant differences between the range and prevalence of vectored pathogens in D. reticulatus from the endemic areas and newly inhabited expansion zones. The differences were likely associated with the different time of settlement or 'source' of ticks populations, the Eastern and the Western one.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The location of all the collection sites utilized in the current study
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Fig1: The location of all the collection sites utilized in the current study

Mentions: Adult questing ticks were collected from September 2011 to May 2014. Additionally, 96 ticks (52 females and 44 males) collected in spring 2009 in Kury (Eastern population, endemic region, east of the Vistula River) were included in the study. Ticks were collected in typical habitats: fallow lands and meadows covered by vegetation higher than 60 cm, located close to water reservoirs and water courses. Sites for tick collection were selected across Poland in four regions that differ in time of appearance/ settlement of D. reticulatus ticks (Fig. 1). Two of these regions were part of the Eastern population, situated in endemic areas of the Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodeship where the earliest reported foci of D. reticulatus have been documented and Masovian Voivodeship, east of the Vistula River, where presence of this tick species is known only from the late 1990’s. A further two regions were situated in two expansion zones – territories west of the Vistula in central Poland (expanding part of the Eastern population known to exist only from the beginning of XXIth century) and areas in western Poland (recently discovered eastwardly expanding Western population). All the sites utilized in this study have been described in detail in Mierzejewska et al. [23]. Collection sites (n = 39) in endemic regions (n = 9) and expansion zones (n = 30) are shown on Fig. 1. A detailed list of adult D. reticulatus ticks collected at each site is shown in Table 1.Fig. 1


Pathogens vectored by the tick, Dermacentor reticulatus, in endemic regions and zones of expansion in Poland.

Mierzejewska EJ, Pawełczyk A, Radkowski M, Welc-Falęciak R, Bajer A - Parasit Vectors (2015)

The location of all the collection sites utilized in the current study
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581476&req=5

Fig1: The location of all the collection sites utilized in the current study
Mentions: Adult questing ticks were collected from September 2011 to May 2014. Additionally, 96 ticks (52 females and 44 males) collected in spring 2009 in Kury (Eastern population, endemic region, east of the Vistula River) were included in the study. Ticks were collected in typical habitats: fallow lands and meadows covered by vegetation higher than 60 cm, located close to water reservoirs and water courses. Sites for tick collection were selected across Poland in four regions that differ in time of appearance/ settlement of D. reticulatus ticks (Fig. 1). Two of these regions were part of the Eastern population, situated in endemic areas of the Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodeship where the earliest reported foci of D. reticulatus have been documented and Masovian Voivodeship, east of the Vistula River, where presence of this tick species is known only from the late 1990’s. A further two regions were situated in two expansion zones – territories west of the Vistula in central Poland (expanding part of the Eastern population known to exist only from the beginning of XXIth century) and areas in western Poland (recently discovered eastwardly expanding Western population). All the sites utilized in this study have been described in detail in Mierzejewska et al. [23]. Collection sites (n = 39) in endemic regions (n = 9) and expansion zones (n = 30) are shown on Fig. 1. A detailed list of adult D. reticulatus ticks collected at each site is shown in Table 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: RNA of the TBE virus was detected using RT-PCR and representative PCR products were sequenced and compared with sequences deposited in GenBank.Our study found significant differences between the range and prevalence of vectored pathogens in D. reticulatus from the endemic areas and newly inhabited expansion zones.The differences were likely associated with the different time of settlement or 'source' of ticks populations, the Eastern and the Western one.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Institute of Zoology, Faculty of Biology, University of Warsaw, 1 Miecznikowa Street, 02-096, Warsaw, Poland. e.mierzejewska@biol.uw.edu.pl.

ABSTRACT

Background: Dermacentor reticulatus plays an important role in the maintenance of pathogens of medical and veterinary importance in the environment. Currently two isolated populations of D. reticulatus are present in Poland--Western and Eastern. The range of the Eastern population covers endemic areas in eastern Poland but this population is expanding westwards creating an expansion zone in the centre of the country. The expansion zone in western Poland is occupied by the recently discovered Western population, spreading eastwards.

Methods: Questing adult ticks (n = 2585) were collected in 2012-2014 in endemic regions of north-eastern (Warmińsko-Mazurskie Voivodeship) and central Poland (Masovian Voivodeship) and in the expansion zones in central and western Poland, in the region between the Vistula River and the western border of the country. Amplification of Babesia, Rickettsia spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato DNAs was performed using specific starters. RNA of the TBE virus was detected using RT-PCR and representative PCR products were sequenced and compared with sequences deposited in GenBank.

Results: Of the total 2585 examined ticks, 1197 (46.3 %) were infected with at least one pathogen. Overall prevalence of pathogens was 4.18 % (108/2585) for Babesia spp., 44.10 % (1140/2585) for Rickettsia spp., 0.09 % (1/1107) for Borrelia afzelii and 7.6 % (7/92) for TBEV. Sequence analysis of DNA showed 99.86 % similarity to R. raoulti and 99.81 % to B. canis. One male from north-eastern Poland was infected with B. microti. Prevalence of R. raoulti was highest in the Western population (52.03 %) and lowest in the Eastern population in north-eastern Poland (34.18 %). Babesia canis was not detected in 592 ticks collected in the Western population, while in the Eastern population overall prevalence was 5.42 %. There were significant differences in the prevalence of B. canis between tick samples from northern (0.68 %), central (1.18 %) and southern (14.8 %) areas of the expansion zone in central Poland.

Conclusions: Our study found significant differences between the range and prevalence of vectored pathogens in D. reticulatus from the endemic areas and newly inhabited expansion zones. The differences were likely associated with the different time of settlement or 'source' of ticks populations, the Eastern and the Western one.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus