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The role of primary surgical treatment in young patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx: a 20-year review of 34 cases.

Wang J, Zhao X, Pan X, Zhao L, Zhou J, Ji M - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: The incidence of smoking was significantly higher in non-young patients compared to young patients.Primary surgery with or without radiotherapy may provide a value treatment option for young LSCC.These data may provide useful information for counseling and treatment planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical College, 2428 Yunhe Road, Weifang, 261031, Shandong, People's Republic China. wangjunxisdl@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical patterns in young Chinese patients (less than 40 years old) with laryngeal squamous cell cancer (LSCC) and the outcome of primary open surgery.

Methods: Thirty-four young patients, with histologically confirmed LSCC between 1985 and 2005 at Qilu Hospital and Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical College, who underwent primary open surgery were retrospectively evaluated according to the clinical patterns in comparison with 374 non-young patients (older than 40 years). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate. The relevance of smoking, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging, lymph node involvement, tumor size, and histological differentiation to overall survival was tested by multivariate analysis.

Results: There was a significantly higher rate of smoking (p = 0.020) in the non-young patients compared to the young patients, but no significant difference was observed in alcohol consumption, tumor location, tumor size, TNM staging, lymph node metastasis, histological grade, and 5-year overall survival. One-year survival rates were 100%, 3-year survival rates were 79.41%, and 5-year survival rates were 67.65%. In the multivariate analysis, lymph node involvement (p = 0.006), tumor stage (p = 0.022), and tumor size (p = 0.004) proved to be significant predictors of overall survival.

Conclusions: The incidence of smoking was significantly higher in non-young patients compared to young patients. Primary surgery with or without radiotherapy may provide a value treatment option for young LSCC. Nodal status, tumor stage, and tumor size were the primary determinants of overall survival in multivariate analysis. These data may provide useful information for counseling and treatment planning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A Kaplan-Meier analysis of the overall survival of young patients with LSSC
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Fig1: A Kaplan-Meier analysis of the overall survival of young patients with LSSC

Mentions: The total of 34 patients that satisfied the inclusion criteria were analyzed as the younger age group. Among these, the mean age was 34.6 2 years and the range was from 24 to 39 years. A detailed description of age is presented in Table 1. All 34 patients were male. When classified according to anatomic location, 11 cases (32.35 %) had supraglottic carcinoma, 22 cases (64.71 %) had glottic carcinomas, and one case (2.94 %) had infraglottic carcinoma. According to pathology, 24 cases (70.59 %) were classified as well and moderate differentiated and ten cases (29.41 %) as poorly differentiated. For younger patients, the most common operation was vertical partial laryngectomy with 21 surgeries (61.76 %), followed by eight horizontal glottis surgeries (23.53 %), four (11.76 %) total laryngectomy, and one (2.94 %) subtotal laryngectomy. Two patients, one with positive and one with close surgical margins underwent surgical re-excision. Fourteen patients (41.18 %) also had a nodal operation. Postoperative radiotherapy was recommended to optimize regional control for 15 (44.12 %) patients. The functional larynx was successfully preserved in 29 (85.29 %) of the younger patients. Decannulation was performed in 28 (82.35 %) younger patients. As for postoperative complication, one patient experienced infection and no patients died. For the younger population, 1-year survival was 100 % in this series, 3-year survival was 79.41 %, and 5-year survival was 67.65 %, as shown in Fig. 1.Table 1


The role of primary surgical treatment in young patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx: a 20-year review of 34 cases.

Wang J, Zhao X, Pan X, Zhao L, Zhou J, Ji M - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

A Kaplan-Meier analysis of the overall survival of young patients with LSSC
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581450&req=5

Fig1: A Kaplan-Meier analysis of the overall survival of young patients with LSSC
Mentions: The total of 34 patients that satisfied the inclusion criteria were analyzed as the younger age group. Among these, the mean age was 34.6 2 years and the range was from 24 to 39 years. A detailed description of age is presented in Table 1. All 34 patients were male. When classified according to anatomic location, 11 cases (32.35 %) had supraglottic carcinoma, 22 cases (64.71 %) had glottic carcinomas, and one case (2.94 %) had infraglottic carcinoma. According to pathology, 24 cases (70.59 %) were classified as well and moderate differentiated and ten cases (29.41 %) as poorly differentiated. For younger patients, the most common operation was vertical partial laryngectomy with 21 surgeries (61.76 %), followed by eight horizontal glottis surgeries (23.53 %), four (11.76 %) total laryngectomy, and one (2.94 %) subtotal laryngectomy. Two patients, one with positive and one with close surgical margins underwent surgical re-excision. Fourteen patients (41.18 %) also had a nodal operation. Postoperative radiotherapy was recommended to optimize regional control for 15 (44.12 %) patients. The functional larynx was successfully preserved in 29 (85.29 %) of the younger patients. Decannulation was performed in 28 (82.35 %) younger patients. As for postoperative complication, one patient experienced infection and no patients died. For the younger population, 1-year survival was 100 % in this series, 3-year survival was 79.41 %, and 5-year survival was 67.65 %, as shown in Fig. 1.Table 1

Bottom Line: The incidence of smoking was significantly higher in non-young patients compared to young patients.Primary surgery with or without radiotherapy may provide a value treatment option for young LSCC.These data may provide useful information for counseling and treatment planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical College, 2428 Yunhe Road, Weifang, 261031, Shandong, People's Republic China. wangjunxisdl@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical patterns in young Chinese patients (less than 40 years old) with laryngeal squamous cell cancer (LSCC) and the outcome of primary open surgery.

Methods: Thirty-four young patients, with histologically confirmed LSCC between 1985 and 2005 at Qilu Hospital and Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical College, who underwent primary open surgery were retrospectively evaluated according to the clinical patterns in comparison with 374 non-young patients (older than 40 years). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the survival rate. The relevance of smoking, tumor location, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging, lymph node involvement, tumor size, and histological differentiation to overall survival was tested by multivariate analysis.

Results: There was a significantly higher rate of smoking (p = 0.020) in the non-young patients compared to the young patients, but no significant difference was observed in alcohol consumption, tumor location, tumor size, TNM staging, lymph node metastasis, histological grade, and 5-year overall survival. One-year survival rates were 100%, 3-year survival rates were 79.41%, and 5-year survival rates were 67.65%. In the multivariate analysis, lymph node involvement (p = 0.006), tumor stage (p = 0.022), and tumor size (p = 0.004) proved to be significant predictors of overall survival.

Conclusions: The incidence of smoking was significantly higher in non-young patients compared to young patients. Primary surgery with or without radiotherapy may provide a value treatment option for young LSCC. Nodal status, tumor stage, and tumor size were the primary determinants of overall survival in multivariate analysis. These data may provide useful information for counseling and treatment planning.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus