Limits...
p16INK4A expression is frequently increased in periorbital and ocular squamous lesions.

Kobalka PJ, Abboud JP, Liao X, Jones K, Lee BW, Korn BS, Kikkawa DO, Lin JH - Diagn Pathol (2015)

Bottom Line: Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05.We found an unexpectedly large prevalence of strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 immunoreactivity in our cases.We found no statistically significant correlation between p16 expression and patient age, gender, ethnicity, or diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego and VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, USA. pkobalka@ucsd.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: p16 expression is a well established biomarker of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma arising from high risk human papilloma virus infection. Increased p16 expression is also seen in squamous neoplasms arising at other sites, including head, neck, and oropharyngeal tract. Squamous lesions are also frequently encountered at ocular surface and peri-orbital skin sites, but the prevalence of increased p16 expression in these lesions has been poorly studied.

Methods: We retrospectively surveyed 13 ocular surface and 16 orbital squamous lesions biopsied at UC San Diego Healthcare System and VA San Diego Healthcare System for p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. These cases included ocular surface lesions with diagnoses of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ. Peri-orbital eyelid biopsies included lesions with diagnoses of SCCis and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We performed multivariate logistic regression, followed by student's T-test or Fisher's exact test to determine if there were statistically significant associations between p16 immunoreactivity and patient age, gender, diagnosis, and ethnicity. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05.

Results: We found an unexpectedly large prevalence of strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 immunoreactivity in our cases. Almost all of the ocular surface squamous lesions were diffusely positive for p16 expression (12/13). All of the periorbital lesions showed diffuse p16 immunoreactivity (16/16). Altogether, 28/29 lesions tested showed strong and diffuse p16 expression. We found no statistically significant correlation between p16 expression and patient age, gender, ethnicity, or diagnosis. In 6 of the peri-orbital biopsies, we had sufficient tissue to assess high-risk HPV expression by in situ hybridization. Interestingly, all of these cases were negative for HPV, despite strong p16 expression.

Conclusion: Strong p16 expression was observed in virtually all of the ocular surface and peri-orbital squamous neoplasms in our study. The relationship between p16 expression and HPV infection in ocular surface and peri-orbital sites requires further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Histology of the negative control, taken from a pterygia (20x, magnification). c Immunohistochemical staining for p16 in the same case (20x magnification). Note the lack of staining in epithelial cells. b, d Positive control p16 immunohistochemical staining, taken from a squamous cell carcinoma in-situ from cervix (4x and 20x, respectively). Note both cytoplasmic and nuclear reactivity
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581440&req=5

Fig1: a Histology of the negative control, taken from a pterygia (20x, magnification). c Immunohistochemical staining for p16 in the same case (20x magnification). Note the lack of staining in epithelial cells. b, d Positive control p16 immunohistochemical staining, taken from a squamous cell carcinoma in-situ from cervix (4x and 20x, respectively). Note both cytoplasmic and nuclear reactivity

Mentions: A total of 29 cases were evaluated for p16 immunoreactivity (Table 1). Patients ranged in age from 37 to 88 and included 11 women and 18 men with White ethnicity (by self-report) being the most common. The majority of patients were seronegative for HIV (27/29). Negative p16 immunoreactivity was defined as lacking cytoplasmic and nuclear labeling of the squamous keratinocytes (Fig. 1), while p16 was considered positive when there was both strong cytoplasmic and nuclear labeling of dysplastic keratinocytes in the lesion. By this criteria, 28 of the 29 cases showed strong p16 immunoreactivity of dysplastic squamous cells (Figs. 2, 3, and 4 and Table 1). When grouped by diagnosis, all of the SCCs (20/20) were p16-positive (Figs. 2 and 4, Table 1), and 8/9 CINs were p16-positive (Table 1).Table 1


p16INK4A expression is frequently increased in periorbital and ocular squamous lesions.

Kobalka PJ, Abboud JP, Liao X, Jones K, Lee BW, Korn BS, Kikkawa DO, Lin JH - Diagn Pathol (2015)

a Histology of the negative control, taken from a pterygia (20x, magnification). c Immunohistochemical staining for p16 in the same case (20x magnification). Note the lack of staining in epithelial cells. b, d Positive control p16 immunohistochemical staining, taken from a squamous cell carcinoma in-situ from cervix (4x and 20x, respectively). Note both cytoplasmic and nuclear reactivity
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581440&req=5

Fig1: a Histology of the negative control, taken from a pterygia (20x, magnification). c Immunohistochemical staining for p16 in the same case (20x magnification). Note the lack of staining in epithelial cells. b, d Positive control p16 immunohistochemical staining, taken from a squamous cell carcinoma in-situ from cervix (4x and 20x, respectively). Note both cytoplasmic and nuclear reactivity
Mentions: A total of 29 cases were evaluated for p16 immunoreactivity (Table 1). Patients ranged in age from 37 to 88 and included 11 women and 18 men with White ethnicity (by self-report) being the most common. The majority of patients were seronegative for HIV (27/29). Negative p16 immunoreactivity was defined as lacking cytoplasmic and nuclear labeling of the squamous keratinocytes (Fig. 1), while p16 was considered positive when there was both strong cytoplasmic and nuclear labeling of dysplastic keratinocytes in the lesion. By this criteria, 28 of the 29 cases showed strong p16 immunoreactivity of dysplastic squamous cells (Figs. 2, 3, and 4 and Table 1). When grouped by diagnosis, all of the SCCs (20/20) were p16-positive (Figs. 2 and 4, Table 1), and 8/9 CINs were p16-positive (Table 1).Table 1

Bottom Line: Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05.We found an unexpectedly large prevalence of strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 immunoreactivity in our cases.We found no statistically significant correlation between p16 expression and patient age, gender, ethnicity, or diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of California San Diego and VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, CA, USA. pkobalka@ucsd.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: p16 expression is a well established biomarker of cervical dysplasia and carcinoma arising from high risk human papilloma virus infection. Increased p16 expression is also seen in squamous neoplasms arising at other sites, including head, neck, and oropharyngeal tract. Squamous lesions are also frequently encountered at ocular surface and peri-orbital skin sites, but the prevalence of increased p16 expression in these lesions has been poorly studied.

Methods: We retrospectively surveyed 13 ocular surface and 16 orbital squamous lesions biopsied at UC San Diego Healthcare System and VA San Diego Healthcare System for p16 expression by immunohistochemistry. These cases included ocular surface lesions with diagnoses of conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN) and squamous cell carcinoma in situ. Peri-orbital eyelid biopsies included lesions with diagnoses of SCCis and invasive squamous cell carcinoma. We performed multivariate logistic regression, followed by student's T-test or Fisher's exact test to determine if there were statistically significant associations between p16 immunoreactivity and patient age, gender, diagnosis, and ethnicity. Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05.

Results: We found an unexpectedly large prevalence of strong nuclear and cytoplasmic p16 immunoreactivity in our cases. Almost all of the ocular surface squamous lesions were diffusely positive for p16 expression (12/13). All of the periorbital lesions showed diffuse p16 immunoreactivity (16/16). Altogether, 28/29 lesions tested showed strong and diffuse p16 expression. We found no statistically significant correlation between p16 expression and patient age, gender, ethnicity, or diagnosis. In 6 of the peri-orbital biopsies, we had sufficient tissue to assess high-risk HPV expression by in situ hybridization. Interestingly, all of these cases were negative for HPV, despite strong p16 expression.

Conclusion: Strong p16 expression was observed in virtually all of the ocular surface and peri-orbital squamous neoplasms in our study. The relationship between p16 expression and HPV infection in ocular surface and peri-orbital sites requires further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus