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Non-operative anti-caries agents and dental caries increment among adults at high caries risk: a retrospective cohort study.

Chaffee BW, Cheng J, Featherstone JD - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Approximately half the patients did not receive any form of non-operative anti-caries agent.However, repeated, spaced delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with approximately one decayed or restored tooth prevented over 18 months for every three patients treated (difference in increment: -0.35; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.08).These results lend evidence that repeatedly receiving anti-caries agents can reduce tooth decay among high-risk patients engaged in regular dental care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center to Address Disparities in Children's Oral Health, UCSF School of Dentistry, 3333 California Street, Suite 495, San Francisco, CA, 94143-1361, USA. benjamin.chaffee@ucsf.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Consensus guidelines support non-operative preventives for dental caries management; yet, their use in practice is far from universal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-operative anti-caries agents in caries prevention among high caries risk adults at a university clinic where risk-based caries management is emphasized.

Methods: This retrospective observational study drew data from the electronic patient records of non-edentulous adult patients deemed to be at high risk for dental caries during baseline oral evaluations that were completed between July 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 at a dental university in the United States. We calculated and compared adjusted mean estimates for the number of new decayed or restored teeth (DFT increment) from baseline to the next completed oral evaluation (N = 2,724 patients with follow-up) across three categories of delivery of non-operative anti-caries agents (e.g., high-concentration fluoride toothpaste, chlorhexidine rinse, xylitol products): never, at a single appointment, or at ≥2 appointments ≥4 weeks apart. Estimates were adjusted for patient and provider characteristics, baseline dental status, losses-to-follow-up, and follow-up time.

Results: Approximately half the patients did not receive any form of non-operative anti-caries agent. Most that received anti-caries agents were given more than one type of product in combination. One-time delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with a similar DFT increment as receiving no such therapy (difference in increment: -0.04; 95% CI: -0.28, 0.21). However, repeated, spaced delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with approximately one decayed or restored tooth prevented over 18 months for every three patients treated (difference in increment: -0.35; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.08).

Conclusions: These results lend evidence that repeatedly receiving anti-caries agents can reduce tooth decay among high-risk patients engaged in regular dental care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subgroup results. The figure demonstrates the adjusted 18-month difference in the number of decayed or restored teeth between patients who received non-operative anti-caries agents repeatedly versus none received, according to subgroups defined by patient characteristics
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Fig2: Subgroup results. The figure demonstrates the adjusted 18-month difference in the number of decayed or restored teeth between patients who received non-operative anti-caries agents repeatedly versus none received, according to subgroups defined by patient characteristics

Mentions: In an exploratory subgroup analysis, we assessed whether the difference in DFT increment between receiving anti-caries agents twice or more and receiving no anti-caries agents varied by patient characteristics (Fig. 2). Notably, the reduction in DFT increment with repeated anti-caries therapy was greatest among patients with public dental benefits (difference in increment: -0.63), a group that almost entirely comprised patients enrolled in the state Medicaid dental program and who were offered anti-caries products at no charge.Fig. 2


Non-operative anti-caries agents and dental caries increment among adults at high caries risk: a retrospective cohort study.

Chaffee BW, Cheng J, Featherstone JD - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Subgroup results. The figure demonstrates the adjusted 18-month difference in the number of decayed or restored teeth between patients who received non-operative anti-caries agents repeatedly versus none received, according to subgroups defined by patient characteristics
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581405&req=5

Fig2: Subgroup results. The figure demonstrates the adjusted 18-month difference in the number of decayed or restored teeth between patients who received non-operative anti-caries agents repeatedly versus none received, according to subgroups defined by patient characteristics
Mentions: In an exploratory subgroup analysis, we assessed whether the difference in DFT increment between receiving anti-caries agents twice or more and receiving no anti-caries agents varied by patient characteristics (Fig. 2). Notably, the reduction in DFT increment with repeated anti-caries therapy was greatest among patients with public dental benefits (difference in increment: -0.63), a group that almost entirely comprised patients enrolled in the state Medicaid dental program and who were offered anti-caries products at no charge.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Approximately half the patients did not receive any form of non-operative anti-caries agent.However, repeated, spaced delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with approximately one decayed or restored tooth prevented over 18 months for every three patients treated (difference in increment: -0.35; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.08).These results lend evidence that repeatedly receiving anti-caries agents can reduce tooth decay among high-risk patients engaged in regular dental care.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center to Address Disparities in Children's Oral Health, UCSF School of Dentistry, 3333 California Street, Suite 495, San Francisco, CA, 94143-1361, USA. benjamin.chaffee@ucsf.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Consensus guidelines support non-operative preventives for dental caries management; yet, their use in practice is far from universal. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of non-operative anti-caries agents in caries prevention among high caries risk adults at a university clinic where risk-based caries management is emphasized.

Methods: This retrospective observational study drew data from the electronic patient records of non-edentulous adult patients deemed to be at high risk for dental caries during baseline oral evaluations that were completed between July 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 at a dental university in the United States. We calculated and compared adjusted mean estimates for the number of new decayed or restored teeth (DFT increment) from baseline to the next completed oral evaluation (N = 2,724 patients with follow-up) across three categories of delivery of non-operative anti-caries agents (e.g., high-concentration fluoride toothpaste, chlorhexidine rinse, xylitol products): never, at a single appointment, or at ≥2 appointments ≥4 weeks apart. Estimates were adjusted for patient and provider characteristics, baseline dental status, losses-to-follow-up, and follow-up time.

Results: Approximately half the patients did not receive any form of non-operative anti-caries agent. Most that received anti-caries agents were given more than one type of product in combination. One-time delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with a similar DFT increment as receiving no such therapy (difference in increment: -0.04; 95% CI: -0.28, 0.21). However, repeated, spaced delivery of anti-caries agents was associated with approximately one decayed or restored tooth prevented over 18 months for every three patients treated (difference in increment: -0.35; 95% CI: -0.65, -0.08).

Conclusions: These results lend evidence that repeatedly receiving anti-caries agents can reduce tooth decay among high-risk patients engaged in regular dental care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus