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Shared transcription factors contribute to distinct cell fates.

Ng FS, Calero-Nieto FJ, Göttgens B - Transcription (2015)

Bottom Line: However, not much is known about the relationship between cell-type-specific binding patterns and gene expression.A recent study demonstrated how the same TFs can have functional roles when binding to largely non-overlapping genomic regions in hematopoietic progenitor and mast cells.Cell-type specific binding profiles of shared TFs are therefore not merely the consequence of opportunistic and functionally irrelevant binding to accessible chromatin, but instead have the potential to make meaningful contributions to cell-type specific transcriptional programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Haematology; Wellcome Trust and MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute & Cambridge Institute for Medical Research ; Cambridge University ; Cambridge , UK.

ABSTRACT
Genome-wide transcription factor (TF) binding profiles differ dramatically between cell types. However, not much is known about the relationship between cell-type-specific binding patterns and gene expression. A recent study demonstrated how the same TFs can have functional roles when binding to largely non-overlapping genomic regions in hematopoietic progenitor and mast cells. Cell-type specific binding profiles of shared TFs are therefore not merely the consequence of opportunistic and functionally irrelevant binding to accessible chromatin, but instead have the potential to make meaningful contributions to cell-type specific transcriptional programs.

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Schematic of gene regulation by ‘shared’ and mast-specific TFs. Both mast-specific and ‘shared’ TFs are important for cell-type-specific gene regulation. Knocking-down a ‘shared’ TF in mast cells results in significant changes to gene expression for a large number of mast-specific genes.
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f0002: Schematic of gene regulation by ‘shared’ and mast-specific TFs. Both mast-specific and ‘shared’ TFs are important for cell-type-specific gene regulation. Knocking-down a ‘shared’ TF in mast cells results in significant changes to gene expression for a large number of mast-specific genes.


Shared transcription factors contribute to distinct cell fates.

Ng FS, Calero-Nieto FJ, Göttgens B - Transcription (2015)

Schematic of gene regulation by ‘shared’ and mast-specific TFs. Both mast-specific and ‘shared’ TFs are important for cell-type-specific gene regulation. Knocking-down a ‘shared’ TF in mast cells results in significant changes to gene expression for a large number of mast-specific genes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581352&req=5

f0002: Schematic of gene regulation by ‘shared’ and mast-specific TFs. Both mast-specific and ‘shared’ TFs are important for cell-type-specific gene regulation. Knocking-down a ‘shared’ TF in mast cells results in significant changes to gene expression for a large number of mast-specific genes.
Bottom Line: However, not much is known about the relationship between cell-type-specific binding patterns and gene expression.A recent study demonstrated how the same TFs can have functional roles when binding to largely non-overlapping genomic regions in hematopoietic progenitor and mast cells.Cell-type specific binding profiles of shared TFs are therefore not merely the consequence of opportunistic and functionally irrelevant binding to accessible chromatin, but instead have the potential to make meaningful contributions to cell-type specific transcriptional programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Haematology; Wellcome Trust and MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute & Cambridge Institute for Medical Research ; Cambridge University ; Cambridge , UK.

ABSTRACT
Genome-wide transcription factor (TF) binding profiles differ dramatically between cell types. However, not much is known about the relationship between cell-type-specific binding patterns and gene expression. A recent study demonstrated how the same TFs can have functional roles when binding to largely non-overlapping genomic regions in hematopoietic progenitor and mast cells. Cell-type specific binding profiles of shared TFs are therefore not merely the consequence of opportunistic and functionally irrelevant binding to accessible chromatin, but instead have the potential to make meaningful contributions to cell-type specific transcriptional programs.

Show MeSH