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A survey on parasite management by equine veterinarians highlights the need for a regulation change.

Sallé G, Cabaret J - Vet Rec Open (2015)

Bottom Line: This was associated with the report of many off-label uses of anthelmintics and the frequent buying of drugs using the internet.Given the critical situation regarding anthelmintic resistance, it seems necessary for veterinarians to reclaim parasite management and prevention as a specific topic.Implementation of stricter regulations for use of anthelmintics, like the one applied in Denmark, may make parasitic management in equids more sustainable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santé Publique , Nouzilly , France ; Université François Rabelais de Tours, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santé Publique , Tours , France.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In-depth knowledge of the use of anthelminthics in the field, especially by veterinarians, is required to design more sustainable parasite control strategies.

Materials and methods: An online survey was sent by e-mail to 940 equine veterinary practitioners to describe their equine practice, their awareness about parasites and the management strategies they apply.

Results: Gastrointestinal parasites were generally considered (68%) as an issue of moderate importance. Drug efficacy failure was a minor or moderate issue for 47% and 48% of responders, respectively. Parasite management mostly relied on the use of systematic calendar treatments across a wide variety of horse owners (ie, riding schools, studs or hobby horse owners). Almost half of the practitioners (42%) never performed Faecal Egg Count (FEC) before drenching. Horse owners or their employees in charge of equines were reported to be the only person managing drenching in 59% of the collected answers. This was associated with the report of many off-label uses of anthelmintics and the frequent buying of drugs using the internet.

Conclusions: Given the critical situation regarding anthelmintic resistance, it seems necessary for veterinarians to reclaim parasite management and prevention as a specific topic. Implementation of stricter regulations for use of anthelmintics, like the one applied in Denmark, may make parasitic management in equids more sustainable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk factors potentially associated with drug failure. This figure describes the relative frequency of the person in charge of drenching (veterinarian (1 per cent of responders), horse owner (59 per cent of responders) or both (40 per cent of responders)) on (a). The frequency of some potential risk factor in the use of anthelmintic compounds is also illustrated through a stacked bar plot about the awareness of off-label use (b) and the distribution of the estimated proportion of clients (given by responders; listed on the x-axis as a percentage value) buying their anthelmintic drugs from the internet (c). In each case, plots are based on a total count of 91 responders
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VETRECO2014000104F3: Risk factors potentially associated with drug failure. This figure describes the relative frequency of the person in charge of drenching (veterinarian (1 per cent of responders), horse owner (59 per cent of responders) or both (40 per cent of responders)) on (a). The frequency of some potential risk factor in the use of anthelmintic compounds is also illustrated through a stacked bar plot about the awareness of off-label use (b) and the distribution of the estimated proportion of clients (given by responders; listed on the x-axis as a percentage value) buying their anthelmintic drugs from the internet (c). In each case, plots are based on a total count of 91 responders

Mentions: Horse owners were reported to play an important role in drenching: they were the only person in charge in 59 per cent of the collected answers, while only one practitioner indicated he was the only person in charge of drenching in his practice (Fig 3a).


A survey on parasite management by equine veterinarians highlights the need for a regulation change.

Sallé G, Cabaret J - Vet Rec Open (2015)

Risk factors potentially associated with drug failure. This figure describes the relative frequency of the person in charge of drenching (veterinarian (1 per cent of responders), horse owner (59 per cent of responders) or both (40 per cent of responders)) on (a). The frequency of some potential risk factor in the use of anthelmintic compounds is also illustrated through a stacked bar plot about the awareness of off-label use (b) and the distribution of the estimated proportion of clients (given by responders; listed on the x-axis as a percentage value) buying their anthelmintic drugs from the internet (c). In each case, plots are based on a total count of 91 responders
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581345&req=5

VETRECO2014000104F3: Risk factors potentially associated with drug failure. This figure describes the relative frequency of the person in charge of drenching (veterinarian (1 per cent of responders), horse owner (59 per cent of responders) or both (40 per cent of responders)) on (a). The frequency of some potential risk factor in the use of anthelmintic compounds is also illustrated through a stacked bar plot about the awareness of off-label use (b) and the distribution of the estimated proportion of clients (given by responders; listed on the x-axis as a percentage value) buying their anthelmintic drugs from the internet (c). In each case, plots are based on a total count of 91 responders
Mentions: Horse owners were reported to play an important role in drenching: they were the only person in charge in 59 per cent of the collected answers, while only one practitioner indicated he was the only person in charge of drenching in his practice (Fig 3a).

Bottom Line: This was associated with the report of many off-label uses of anthelmintics and the frequent buying of drugs using the internet.Given the critical situation regarding anthelmintic resistance, it seems necessary for veterinarians to reclaim parasite management and prevention as a specific topic.Implementation of stricter regulations for use of anthelmintics, like the one applied in Denmark, may make parasitic management in equids more sustainable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INRA, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santé Publique , Nouzilly , France ; Université François Rabelais de Tours, UMR1282 Infectiologie et Santé Publique , Tours , France.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In-depth knowledge of the use of anthelminthics in the field, especially by veterinarians, is required to design more sustainable parasite control strategies.

Materials and methods: An online survey was sent by e-mail to 940 equine veterinary practitioners to describe their equine practice, their awareness about parasites and the management strategies they apply.

Results: Gastrointestinal parasites were generally considered (68%) as an issue of moderate importance. Drug efficacy failure was a minor or moderate issue for 47% and 48% of responders, respectively. Parasite management mostly relied on the use of systematic calendar treatments across a wide variety of horse owners (ie, riding schools, studs or hobby horse owners). Almost half of the practitioners (42%) never performed Faecal Egg Count (FEC) before drenching. Horse owners or their employees in charge of equines were reported to be the only person managing drenching in 59% of the collected answers. This was associated with the report of many off-label uses of anthelmintics and the frequent buying of drugs using the internet.

Conclusions: Given the critical situation regarding anthelmintic resistance, it seems necessary for veterinarians to reclaim parasite management and prevention as a specific topic. Implementation of stricter regulations for use of anthelmintics, like the one applied in Denmark, may make parasitic management in equids more sustainable.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus