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Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

Rogers HB, Anani T, Choi YS, Beyers RJ, David AE - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm.Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs.Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn, AL 36849, USA. hunterrogers2014@u.northwestern.edu.

ABSTRACT
Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Digital image of MagCoil magnetic separation prototype composed of 1/8′′ I.D. tubing wrapped around the length of a 2′′ diametrically magnetized cylinder encased in a plastic column for stability; (b) Average size distributions obtained using the MagCoil prototype and flow rates of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mL/min, as well as the flushed particles (LO) calculated from the results of three separate experimental runs; (c) Box-and-whisker plot comparing the size distributions obtained using the MagCoil, at the varying flowrates, to the original size distribution. Horizontal lines indicate the mean diameter (nm), while the bar indicates standard deviation, and the vertical line the range. Significance determined using a two-tailed, two sample t-test (n = 90; ***p < 0.001; *p < 0.05; ns—not significant). The large sampling size of DLS (>100 k particle counts/s) leads to a statistically significant result between samples that would seem to be identical otherwise.
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ijms-16-20001-f004: (a) Digital image of MagCoil magnetic separation prototype composed of 1/8′′ I.D. tubing wrapped around the length of a 2′′ diametrically magnetized cylinder encased in a plastic column for stability; (b) Average size distributions obtained using the MagCoil prototype and flow rates of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mL/min, as well as the flushed particles (LO) calculated from the results of three separate experimental runs; (c) Box-and-whisker plot comparing the size distributions obtained using the MagCoil, at the varying flowrates, to the original size distribution. Horizontal lines indicate the mean diameter (nm), while the bar indicates standard deviation, and the vertical line the range. Significance determined using a two-tailed, two sample t-test (n = 90; ***p < 0.001; *p < 0.05; ns—not significant). The large sampling size of DLS (>100 k particle counts/s) leads to a statistically significant result between samples that would seem to be identical otherwise.

Mentions: This was accomplished by creating a simple experimental setup, called the MagCoil, composed of a 18.5′′ length of 1/8′′ I.D. tubing wrapped around the entire 2′′ length of a Grade N42 diametrically magnetized neodymium cylinder (Model No.: ND039-0, Applied Magnets, Plano, TX, USA), as seen in Figure 4a. An inlet for both the MNP suspension and mobile phase were included at the top and a single outlet at the bottom was used for the collection of samples.


Exploiting Size-Dependent Drag and Magnetic Forces for Size-Specific Separation of Magnetic Nanoparticles.

Rogers HB, Anani T, Choi YS, Beyers RJ, David AE - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

(a) Digital image of MagCoil magnetic separation prototype composed of 1/8′′ I.D. tubing wrapped around the length of a 2′′ diametrically magnetized cylinder encased in a plastic column for stability; (b) Average size distributions obtained using the MagCoil prototype and flow rates of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mL/min, as well as the flushed particles (LO) calculated from the results of three separate experimental runs; (c) Box-and-whisker plot comparing the size distributions obtained using the MagCoil, at the varying flowrates, to the original size distribution. Horizontal lines indicate the mean diameter (nm), while the bar indicates standard deviation, and the vertical line the range. Significance determined using a two-tailed, two sample t-test (n = 90; ***p < 0.001; *p < 0.05; ns—not significant). The large sampling size of DLS (>100 k particle counts/s) leads to a statistically significant result between samples that would seem to be identical otherwise.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581337&req=5

ijms-16-20001-f004: (a) Digital image of MagCoil magnetic separation prototype composed of 1/8′′ I.D. tubing wrapped around the length of a 2′′ diametrically magnetized cylinder encased in a plastic column for stability; (b) Average size distributions obtained using the MagCoil prototype and flow rates of 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 mL/min, as well as the flushed particles (LO) calculated from the results of three separate experimental runs; (c) Box-and-whisker plot comparing the size distributions obtained using the MagCoil, at the varying flowrates, to the original size distribution. Horizontal lines indicate the mean diameter (nm), while the bar indicates standard deviation, and the vertical line the range. Significance determined using a two-tailed, two sample t-test (n = 90; ***p < 0.001; *p < 0.05; ns—not significant). The large sampling size of DLS (>100 k particle counts/s) leads to a statistically significant result between samples that would seem to be identical otherwise.
Mentions: This was accomplished by creating a simple experimental setup, called the MagCoil, composed of a 18.5′′ length of 1/8′′ I.D. tubing wrapped around the entire 2′′ length of a Grade N42 diametrically magnetized neodymium cylinder (Model No.: ND039-0, Applied Magnets, Plano, TX, USA), as seen in Figure 4a. An inlet for both the MNP suspension and mobile phase were included at the top and a single outlet at the bottom was used for the collection of samples.

Bottom Line: Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm.Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs.Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Engineering, Auburn University, 212 Ross Hall, Auburn, AL 36849, USA. hunterrogers2014@u.northwestern.edu.

ABSTRACT
Realizing the full potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in nanomedicine requires the optimization of their physical and chemical properties. Elucidation of the effects of these properties on clinical diagnostic or therapeutic properties, however, requires the synthesis or purification of homogenous samples, which has proved to be difficult. While initial simulations indicated that size-selective separation could be achieved by flowing magnetic nanoparticles through a magnetic field, subsequent in vitro experiments were unable to reproduce the predicted results. Magnetic field-flow fractionation, however, was found to be an effective method for the separation of polydisperse suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 nm. While similar methods have been used to separate magnetic nanoparticles before, no previous work has been done with magnetic nanoparticles between 20 and 200 nm. Both transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were used to confirm the size of the MNPs. Further development of this work could lead to MNPs with the narrow size distributions necessary for their in vitro and in vivo optimization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus