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Polymer/Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Composites--A Straight Forward and Scalable Synthesis Approach.

Sommertune J, Sugunan A, Ahniyaz A, Bejhed RS, Sarwe A, Johansson C, Balceris C, Ludwig F, Posth O, Fornara A - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Multi-core particles were obtained within the Z-average size range of 130 to 340 nm.With the aim to combine the fast room temperature magnetic relaxation of small individual cores with high magnetization of the ensemble of SPIONs, we used small (<10 nm) core nanoparticles.The performed synthesis is highly flexible with respect to the choice of polymer and SPION loading and gives rise to multi-core particles with interesting magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast efficacy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SP, Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden. jens.sommertune@sp.se.

ABSTRACT
Magnetic nanoparticle systems can be divided into single-core nanoparticles (with only one magnetic core per particle) and magnetic multi-core nanoparticles (with several magnetic cores per particle). Here, we report multi-core nanoparticle synthesis based on a controlled precipitation process within a well-defined oil in water emulsion to trap the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in a range of polymer matrices of choice, such as poly(styrene), poly(lactid acid), poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(caprolactone). Multi-core particles were obtained within the Z-average size range of 130 to 340 nm. With the aim to combine the fast room temperature magnetic relaxation of small individual cores with high magnetization of the ensemble of SPIONs, we used small (<10 nm) core nanoparticles. The performed synthesis is highly flexible with respect to the choice of polymer and SPION loading and gives rise to multi-core particles with interesting magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast efficacy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

TEM micrograph of sample A, STEM (scanning transmission electron microscope) micrographs of sample B, C, and D (scale bars 100 nm).
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ijms-16-19752-f002: TEM micrograph of sample A, STEM (scanning transmission electron microscope) micrographs of sample B, C, and D (scale bars 100 nm).

Mentions: One of the ways to overcome this dilemma is to synthesize and utilize multi-core particles, where the individual magnetic cores do not show significant magnetic interactions. With this aim we produced composite nanoparticles consisting of multiple magnetic cores within a larger polymeric nanoparticle. SPIONS were trapped into different polymers and an overview of the resulting samples to be discussed is shown in Table 1. Figure 2 shows the TEM micrograph of sample A and the STEM micrographs of samples B, C, and D. The micrographs of sample A reveal a somewhat inhomogeneous distribution of the SPION in the poly(styrene) (PS) matrix. However, there are neither “empty” PS-spheres nor free SPION observed.


Polymer/Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Composites--A Straight Forward and Scalable Synthesis Approach.

Sommertune J, Sugunan A, Ahniyaz A, Bejhed RS, Sarwe A, Johansson C, Balceris C, Ludwig F, Posth O, Fornara A - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

TEM micrograph of sample A, STEM (scanning transmission electron microscope) micrographs of sample B, C, and D (scale bars 100 nm).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4581323&req=5

ijms-16-19752-f002: TEM micrograph of sample A, STEM (scanning transmission electron microscope) micrographs of sample B, C, and D (scale bars 100 nm).
Mentions: One of the ways to overcome this dilemma is to synthesize and utilize multi-core particles, where the individual magnetic cores do not show significant magnetic interactions. With this aim we produced composite nanoparticles consisting of multiple magnetic cores within a larger polymeric nanoparticle. SPIONS were trapped into different polymers and an overview of the resulting samples to be discussed is shown in Table 1. Figure 2 shows the TEM micrograph of sample A and the STEM micrographs of samples B, C, and D. The micrographs of sample A reveal a somewhat inhomogeneous distribution of the SPION in the poly(styrene) (PS) matrix. However, there are neither “empty” PS-spheres nor free SPION observed.

Bottom Line: Multi-core particles were obtained within the Z-average size range of 130 to 340 nm.With the aim to combine the fast room temperature magnetic relaxation of small individual cores with high magnetization of the ensemble of SPIONs, we used small (<10 nm) core nanoparticles.The performed synthesis is highly flexible with respect to the choice of polymer and SPION loading and gives rise to multi-core particles with interesting magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast efficacy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: SP, Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Box 5607, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden. jens.sommertune@sp.se.

ABSTRACT
Magnetic nanoparticle systems can be divided into single-core nanoparticles (with only one magnetic core per particle) and magnetic multi-core nanoparticles (with several magnetic cores per particle). Here, we report multi-core nanoparticle synthesis based on a controlled precipitation process within a well-defined oil in water emulsion to trap the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) in a range of polymer matrices of choice, such as poly(styrene), poly(lactid acid), poly(methyl methacrylate), and poly(caprolactone). Multi-core particles were obtained within the Z-average size range of 130 to 340 nm. With the aim to combine the fast room temperature magnetic relaxation of small individual cores with high magnetization of the ensemble of SPIONs, we used small (<10 nm) core nanoparticles. The performed synthesis is highly flexible with respect to the choice of polymer and SPION loading and gives rise to multi-core particles with interesting magnetic properties and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast efficacy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus