Limits...
Noncompaction of Ventricular Myocardium Involving the Right Ventricle.

Saglam M, Saygin H, Kozan H, Ozturk E, Mutlu H - Korean Circ J (2015)

Bottom Line: It has been reported that myocardial noncompaction could present as acquired disease.The most common site of involvement is the left ventricle, with right ventricular involvement being reported in a few cases.In this report, we present a case with noncompaction of the right ventricle (RV).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Noncompaction ventricular myocardium is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy. It is association with congenital heart defects, most often with outflow obstructive lesions or coronary anomalies. However, no factor could explain the arrest of development of myocardial structure (isolated form). The pathogenesis of isolated noncompaction is thought to be an arrest in endomyocardial morphogenesis. It has been reported that myocardial noncompaction could present as acquired disease. The most common site of involvement is the left ventricle, with right ventricular involvement being reported in a few cases. In this report, we present a case with noncompaction of the right ventricle (RV). Cardiac computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated morphological abnormalities of the RV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 72-year old male with noncompaction of right ventricle. A: short axis view of the ventricles on computed tomography imaging showing deep intertrabecular recesses within the right ventricle with a noncompacted to compacted myocardium ratio of 8.5. B: true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true-FISP) cine four-chamber magnetic resonance image delineating noncompaction in the apical region of the right ventricle (star).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4580705&req=5

Figure 1: A 72-year old male with noncompaction of right ventricle. A: short axis view of the ventricles on computed tomography imaging showing deep intertrabecular recesses within the right ventricle with a noncompacted to compacted myocardium ratio of 8.5. B: true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true-FISP) cine four-chamber magnetic resonance image delineating noncompaction in the apical region of the right ventricle (star).

Mentions: A 72-year-old male presented mild chest discomfort and palpitation sense with effort. In his medical history, he had hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. He had 3 stents placed at the coronary arteries. He had no relevant history of familial heart disease or history of smoking. On admission, his blood pressure was 157/85 mm Hg with pulse rate at 84 beats/min. Physical examination revealed no abnormality. Transthoracic echocardiogram reveal-ed a hypertrabeculated and spongiform appearance of the right ventricular apical segment. A color doppler echocardiographic examination revealed the presence of blood flow in the deep intertrabecular recesses. On four chamber view, end-diastolic basal diameter of the RV was measured at 4 cm (normal <4.2 cm). RV systolic function was observed as normal with tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion of 2 cm and myocardial performance index of 0.35. CCTA revealed two stents located at the proximal segment of the left anterior descending artery and one stent located at mid-segment of the circumflex artery. Mild intimal hyperplasia was reported at the intimal surface of the stents. Additionally, a prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses were observed at the apex of the RV. Noncompacted thickness (NC) of the RV in diastole was 22.2 mm at the apical level with compacted thickness (C) of 2.6 mm (NC/C ratio 8.5) (Fig. 1A). Cardiac MRI was performed for functional assessment. Wall hypokinesis was observed at the mid and distal anterior wall segments of the LV. No visible wall hypokinesis was observed at the RV. Noncompacted wall segments of the RV were well depicted on four-chamber static image of the cine-MRI (Fig. 1B).


Noncompaction of Ventricular Myocardium Involving the Right Ventricle.

Saglam M, Saygin H, Kozan H, Ozturk E, Mutlu H - Korean Circ J (2015)

A 72-year old male with noncompaction of right ventricle. A: short axis view of the ventricles on computed tomography imaging showing deep intertrabecular recesses within the right ventricle with a noncompacted to compacted myocardium ratio of 8.5. B: true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true-FISP) cine four-chamber magnetic resonance image delineating noncompaction in the apical region of the right ventricle (star).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4580705&req=5

Figure 1: A 72-year old male with noncompaction of right ventricle. A: short axis view of the ventricles on computed tomography imaging showing deep intertrabecular recesses within the right ventricle with a noncompacted to compacted myocardium ratio of 8.5. B: true fast imaging with steady-state precession (true-FISP) cine four-chamber magnetic resonance image delineating noncompaction in the apical region of the right ventricle (star).
Mentions: A 72-year-old male presented mild chest discomfort and palpitation sense with effort. In his medical history, he had hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus. He had 3 stents placed at the coronary arteries. He had no relevant history of familial heart disease or history of smoking. On admission, his blood pressure was 157/85 mm Hg with pulse rate at 84 beats/min. Physical examination revealed no abnormality. Transthoracic echocardiogram reveal-ed a hypertrabeculated and spongiform appearance of the right ventricular apical segment. A color doppler echocardiographic examination revealed the presence of blood flow in the deep intertrabecular recesses. On four chamber view, end-diastolic basal diameter of the RV was measured at 4 cm (normal <4.2 cm). RV systolic function was observed as normal with tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion of 2 cm and myocardial performance index of 0.35. CCTA revealed two stents located at the proximal segment of the left anterior descending artery and one stent located at mid-segment of the circumflex artery. Mild intimal hyperplasia was reported at the intimal surface of the stents. Additionally, a prominent trabecular meshwork and deep intertrabecular recesses were observed at the apex of the RV. Noncompacted thickness (NC) of the RV in diastole was 22.2 mm at the apical level with compacted thickness (C) of 2.6 mm (NC/C ratio 8.5) (Fig. 1A). Cardiac MRI was performed for functional assessment. Wall hypokinesis was observed at the mid and distal anterior wall segments of the LV. No visible wall hypokinesis was observed at the RV. Noncompacted wall segments of the RV were well depicted on four-chamber static image of the cine-MRI (Fig. 1B).

Bottom Line: It has been reported that myocardial noncompaction could present as acquired disease.The most common site of involvement is the left ventricle, with right ventricular involvement being reported in a few cases.In this report, we present a case with noncompaction of the right ventricle (RV).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, GATA Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
Noncompaction ventricular myocardium is an unusual cause of cardiomyopathy. It is association with congenital heart defects, most often with outflow obstructive lesions or coronary anomalies. However, no factor could explain the arrest of development of myocardial structure (isolated form). The pathogenesis of isolated noncompaction is thought to be an arrest in endomyocardial morphogenesis. It has been reported that myocardial noncompaction could present as acquired disease. The most common site of involvement is the left ventricle, with right ventricular involvement being reported in a few cases. In this report, we present a case with noncompaction of the right ventricle (RV). Cardiac computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated morphological abnormalities of the RV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus