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Effects of Previous Land-Use on Plant Species Composition and Diversity in Mediterranean Forests.

Kouba Y, Martínez-García F, de Frutos Á, Alados CL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We compared forest stands that differed both in land-use history and in successional stage.The study revealed significant compositional differentiation among stands that was due to among-stand variations in the diversity (namely, species richness and evenness) of early-, intermediate-, and late-successional species.Historical land management has led to an increase in compositional divergences among forest stands and the loss of late-successional forest species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología (CSIC), Zaragoza, Spain.

ABSTRACT
At some point in their history, most forests in the Mediterranean Basin have been subjected to intensive management or converted to agriculture land. Knowing how forest plant communities recovered after the abandonment of forest-management or agricultural practices (including livestock grazing) provides a basis for investigating how previous land management have affected plant species diversity and composition in forest ecosystems. Our study investigated the consequences of historical "land management" practices on present-day Mediterranean forests by comparing species assemblages and the diversity of (i) all plant species and (ii) each ecological group defined by species' habitat preferences and successional status (i.e., early-, mid-, and late-successional species). We compared forest stands that differed both in land-use history and in successional stage. In addition, we evaluated the value of those stands for biodiversity conservation. The study revealed significant compositional differentiation among stands that was due to among-stand variations in the diversity (namely, species richness and evenness) of early-, intermediate-, and late-successional species. Historical land management has led to an increase in compositional divergences among forest stands and the loss of late-successional forest species.

No MeSH data available.


Influence of predictor variables on plant species diversity in ten oak stands in the Central Pre-Pyrenees, Spain.Species richness and evenness (AS: all plant species; ES: Early-successional species; IS: Intermediate-successional species; LS: Late-successional species) as influenced by stand age “AGE” (O: old stands; Y: young stands), age structure of stand “CVAGE” (EA: even-aged stands; UEA: Uneven-aged stands), and forest type “FORTYPE” (SF: secondary growth stands; CS: abandoned coppice stands). Boxes that have the same letter did not differ significantly based on ANCOVA.
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pone.0139031.g003: Influence of predictor variables on plant species diversity in ten oak stands in the Central Pre-Pyrenees, Spain.Species richness and evenness (AS: all plant species; ES: Early-successional species; IS: Intermediate-successional species; LS: Late-successional species) as influenced by stand age “AGE” (O: old stands; Y: young stands), age structure of stand “CVAGE” (EA: even-aged stands; UEA: Uneven-aged stands), and forest type “FORTYPE” (SF: secondary growth stands; CS: abandoned coppice stands). Boxes that have the same letter did not differ significantly based on ANCOVA.

Mentions: Secondary growth stands that had been established on abandoned lands, young stands, and uneven-aged stands had the highest plant species richness (Fig 3), which was negatively correlated with “CANCOV” (Fig 4). Using successional species groups, the same trends in species richness were apparent among ES and IS species (Table 3; Figs 3 and 4), although the effect of “AGE” among IS species was not statistically significant (Table 3). None of the explanatory variables had a significant effect on the species richness among LS species (Table 3). Among ES and IS species, evenness was affected by “CANCOV” and, among LS species, “CVAGE” had a significant effect on species evenness (Table 3). Species evenness among LS species was significantly higher in even-aged stands than it was in uneven-aged stands (Fig 3). Furthermore, evenness was positively correlated with “CANCOV” among ES species, but was negatively correlated with “CANCOV” among IS species (Fig 4).


Effects of Previous Land-Use on Plant Species Composition and Diversity in Mediterranean Forests.

Kouba Y, Martínez-García F, de Frutos Á, Alados CL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Influence of predictor variables on plant species diversity in ten oak stands in the Central Pre-Pyrenees, Spain.Species richness and evenness (AS: all plant species; ES: Early-successional species; IS: Intermediate-successional species; LS: Late-successional species) as influenced by stand age “AGE” (O: old stands; Y: young stands), age structure of stand “CVAGE” (EA: even-aged stands; UEA: Uneven-aged stands), and forest type “FORTYPE” (SF: secondary growth stands; CS: abandoned coppice stands). Boxes that have the same letter did not differ significantly based on ANCOVA.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4580598&req=5

pone.0139031.g003: Influence of predictor variables on plant species diversity in ten oak stands in the Central Pre-Pyrenees, Spain.Species richness and evenness (AS: all plant species; ES: Early-successional species; IS: Intermediate-successional species; LS: Late-successional species) as influenced by stand age “AGE” (O: old stands; Y: young stands), age structure of stand “CVAGE” (EA: even-aged stands; UEA: Uneven-aged stands), and forest type “FORTYPE” (SF: secondary growth stands; CS: abandoned coppice stands). Boxes that have the same letter did not differ significantly based on ANCOVA.
Mentions: Secondary growth stands that had been established on abandoned lands, young stands, and uneven-aged stands had the highest plant species richness (Fig 3), which was negatively correlated with “CANCOV” (Fig 4). Using successional species groups, the same trends in species richness were apparent among ES and IS species (Table 3; Figs 3 and 4), although the effect of “AGE” among IS species was not statistically significant (Table 3). None of the explanatory variables had a significant effect on the species richness among LS species (Table 3). Among ES and IS species, evenness was affected by “CANCOV” and, among LS species, “CVAGE” had a significant effect on species evenness (Table 3). Species evenness among LS species was significantly higher in even-aged stands than it was in uneven-aged stands (Fig 3). Furthermore, evenness was positively correlated with “CANCOV” among ES species, but was negatively correlated with “CANCOV” among IS species (Fig 4).

Bottom Line: We compared forest stands that differed both in land-use history and in successional stage.The study revealed significant compositional differentiation among stands that was due to among-stand variations in the diversity (namely, species richness and evenness) of early-, intermediate-, and late-successional species.Historical land management has led to an increase in compositional divergences among forest stands and the loss of late-successional forest species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología (CSIC), Zaragoza, Spain.

ABSTRACT
At some point in their history, most forests in the Mediterranean Basin have been subjected to intensive management or converted to agriculture land. Knowing how forest plant communities recovered after the abandonment of forest-management or agricultural practices (including livestock grazing) provides a basis for investigating how previous land management have affected plant species diversity and composition in forest ecosystems. Our study investigated the consequences of historical "land management" practices on present-day Mediterranean forests by comparing species assemblages and the diversity of (i) all plant species and (ii) each ecological group defined by species' habitat preferences and successional status (i.e., early-, mid-, and late-successional species). We compared forest stands that differed both in land-use history and in successional stage. In addition, we evaluated the value of those stands for biodiversity conservation. The study revealed significant compositional differentiation among stands that was due to among-stand variations in the diversity (namely, species richness and evenness) of early-, intermediate-, and late-successional species. Historical land management has led to an increase in compositional divergences among forest stands and the loss of late-successional forest species.

No MeSH data available.