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Stress and Auditory Responses of the Otophysan Fish, Cyprinella venusta, to Road Traffic Noise.

Crovo JA, Mendonça MT, Holt DE, Johnston CE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent studies demonstrate that road traffic noise propagates effectively from bridge crossings into surrounding freshwater ecosystems; yet, its effect on the stress response and auditory function of freshwater stream fishes is unexamined.Fish were exposed to an underwater recording of traffic noise played at approximately 140 dB re 1 μPa.Individuals exposed to 2 hours of traffic noise playback had elevated hearing thresholds at 300 and 400 Hz, corresponding to the most sensitive bandwidth for this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fish Biodiversity Lab, School of Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Aquatic Sciences, College of Agriculture, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Noise pollution from anthropogenic sources is an increasingly problematic challenge faced by many taxa, including fishes. Recent studies demonstrate that road traffic noise propagates effectively from bridge crossings into surrounding freshwater ecosystems; yet, its effect on the stress response and auditory function of freshwater stream fishes is unexamined. The blacktail shiner (Cyprinella venusta) was used as a model to investigate the degree to which traffic noise impacts stress and hearing in exposed fishes. Fish were exposed to an underwater recording of traffic noise played at approximately 140 dB re 1 μPa. Waterborne cortisol samples were collected and quantified using enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Auditory thresholds were assessed in control and traffic exposed groups by measuring auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). After acute exposure to traffic noise, fish exhibited a significant elevation in cortisol levels. Individuals exposed to 2 hours of traffic noise playback had elevated hearing thresholds at 300 and 400 Hz, corresponding to the most sensitive bandwidth for this species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Waterborne Cortisol Levels.Cortisol levels for C.venusta exposed to the control and traffic treatments presented as the mean ± SE ng g-1 min-1. * denotes p < 0.05.
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pone.0137290.g002: Waterborne Cortisol Levels.Cortisol levels for C.venusta exposed to the control and traffic treatments presented as the mean ± SE ng g-1 min-1. * denotes p < 0.05.

Mentions: Cortisol levels were significantly elevated after traffic noise exposure (n = 7, F1, 6 = 6.546, p = 0.043). Individuals released 8.2 ± 2.3 ng g-1 30 min-1 when exposed to traffic noise and 5.7 ± 1.1 ng g-1 30 min-1 when exposed to the control treatment (Fig 2). These results equate to approximately a 44.0% change in the cortisol production of exposed C. venusta. The intra-assay coefficient of variation was 2.3%. The inter-assay coefficient of variation was not calculated because all of the samples were analyzed on one plate.


Stress and Auditory Responses of the Otophysan Fish, Cyprinella venusta, to Road Traffic Noise.

Crovo JA, Mendonça MT, Holt DE, Johnston CE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Waterborne Cortisol Levels.Cortisol levels for C.venusta exposed to the control and traffic treatments presented as the mean ± SE ng g-1 min-1. * denotes p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4580447&req=5

pone.0137290.g002: Waterborne Cortisol Levels.Cortisol levels for C.venusta exposed to the control and traffic treatments presented as the mean ± SE ng g-1 min-1. * denotes p < 0.05.
Mentions: Cortisol levels were significantly elevated after traffic noise exposure (n = 7, F1, 6 = 6.546, p = 0.043). Individuals released 8.2 ± 2.3 ng g-1 30 min-1 when exposed to traffic noise and 5.7 ± 1.1 ng g-1 30 min-1 when exposed to the control treatment (Fig 2). These results equate to approximately a 44.0% change in the cortisol production of exposed C. venusta. The intra-assay coefficient of variation was 2.3%. The inter-assay coefficient of variation was not calculated because all of the samples were analyzed on one plate.

Bottom Line: Recent studies demonstrate that road traffic noise propagates effectively from bridge crossings into surrounding freshwater ecosystems; yet, its effect on the stress response and auditory function of freshwater stream fishes is unexamined.Fish were exposed to an underwater recording of traffic noise played at approximately 140 dB re 1 μPa.Individuals exposed to 2 hours of traffic noise playback had elevated hearing thresholds at 300 and 400 Hz, corresponding to the most sensitive bandwidth for this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fish Biodiversity Lab, School of Fisheries, Aquaculture, and Aquatic Sciences, College of Agriculture, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Noise pollution from anthropogenic sources is an increasingly problematic challenge faced by many taxa, including fishes. Recent studies demonstrate that road traffic noise propagates effectively from bridge crossings into surrounding freshwater ecosystems; yet, its effect on the stress response and auditory function of freshwater stream fishes is unexamined. The blacktail shiner (Cyprinella venusta) was used as a model to investigate the degree to which traffic noise impacts stress and hearing in exposed fishes. Fish were exposed to an underwater recording of traffic noise played at approximately 140 dB re 1 μPa. Waterborne cortisol samples were collected and quantified using enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Auditory thresholds were assessed in control and traffic exposed groups by measuring auditory evoked potentials (AEPs). After acute exposure to traffic noise, fish exhibited a significant elevation in cortisol levels. Individuals exposed to 2 hours of traffic noise playback had elevated hearing thresholds at 300 and 400 Hz, corresponding to the most sensitive bandwidth for this species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus