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Intra- and Inter-Task Reliability of Spatial Attention Measures in Pseudoneglect.

Learmonth G, Gallagher A, Gibson J, Thut G, Harvey M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Fifty right-handed young adults were tested on five tasks (manual line bisection, landmark, greyscales, gratingscales and lateralised visual detection) on two different days.Surprisingly, no strongly significant inter-task correlations were found.However, principal component analysis revealed left-right asymmetries to be subdivided in 4 main components, namely asymmetries in size judgements (manual line bisection and landmark), luminance judgements (greyscales), stimulus detection (lateralised visual detection) and judgements of global/local features (manual line bisection and grating scales).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom; School of Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Healthy young adults display a leftward asymmetry of spatial attention ("pseudoneglect") that has been measured with a wide range of different tasks. Yet at present there is a lack of systematic evidence that the tasks commonly used in research today are i) stable measures over time and ii) provide similar measures of spatial bias. Fifty right-handed young adults were tested on five tasks (manual line bisection, landmark, greyscales, gratingscales and lateralised visual detection) on two different days. All five tasks were found to be stable measures of bias over the two testing sessions, indicating that each is a reliable measure in itself. Surprisingly, no strongly significant inter-task correlations were found. However, principal component analysis revealed left-right asymmetries to be subdivided in 4 main components, namely asymmetries in size judgements (manual line bisection and landmark), luminance judgements (greyscales), stimulus detection (lateralised visual detection) and judgements of global/local features (manual line bisection and grating scales). The results align with recent research on hemispatial neglect which conceptualises the condition as multi-component rather than a single pathological deficit of spatial attention. We conclude that spatial biases in judgment of visual stimulus features in healthy adults (e.g., pseudoneglect) is also a multi-component phenomenon that may be captured by variations in task demands which engage task-dependent patterns of activation within the attention network.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intra-task correlations.Day 1 vs Day 2 biases are significantly correlated for all 5 tasks (i.e. each task provides a stable measure) over the two testing days (all p-values <0.05). Line of best fit and 95% confidence intervals are marked. * represents a significant correlation at α = 0.05.
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pone.0138379.g006: Intra-task correlations.Day 1 vs Day 2 biases are significantly correlated for all 5 tasks (i.e. each task provides a stable measure) over the two testing days (all p-values <0.05). Line of best fit and 95% confidence intervals are marked. * represents a significant correlation at α = 0.05.

Mentions: A series of Pearson’s r correlation tests were used to assess the intra-task test-retest reliability of performance between Day 1 and Day 2 across participants. The biases obtained on all five tasks were correlated across testing days (Fig 6), showing that each measure is a stable indicator of individual spatial attention bias despite some tasks not scoring on an overall bias. Pearson’s r of Day 1 vs Day 2 were: [MLB: r = 0.846, p<0.001; LM: r = 0.595, p<0.001; GRE: r = 0.564, p<0.001; GRA: r = 0.560, p<0.001; LVD (d’): r = 0.395, p = 0.005; LVD (PF 50%): r = 0.342, p = 0.023].


Intra- and Inter-Task Reliability of Spatial Attention Measures in Pseudoneglect.

Learmonth G, Gallagher A, Gibson J, Thut G, Harvey M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Intra-task correlations.Day 1 vs Day 2 biases are significantly correlated for all 5 tasks (i.e. each task provides a stable measure) over the two testing days (all p-values <0.05). Line of best fit and 95% confidence intervals are marked. * represents a significant correlation at α = 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4574708&req=5

pone.0138379.g006: Intra-task correlations.Day 1 vs Day 2 biases are significantly correlated for all 5 tasks (i.e. each task provides a stable measure) over the two testing days (all p-values <0.05). Line of best fit and 95% confidence intervals are marked. * represents a significant correlation at α = 0.05.
Mentions: A series of Pearson’s r correlation tests were used to assess the intra-task test-retest reliability of performance between Day 1 and Day 2 across participants. The biases obtained on all five tasks were correlated across testing days (Fig 6), showing that each measure is a stable indicator of individual spatial attention bias despite some tasks not scoring on an overall bias. Pearson’s r of Day 1 vs Day 2 were: [MLB: r = 0.846, p<0.001; LM: r = 0.595, p<0.001; GRE: r = 0.564, p<0.001; GRA: r = 0.560, p<0.001; LVD (d’): r = 0.395, p = 0.005; LVD (PF 50%): r = 0.342, p = 0.023].

Bottom Line: Fifty right-handed young adults were tested on five tasks (manual line bisection, landmark, greyscales, gratingscales and lateralised visual detection) on two different days.Surprisingly, no strongly significant inter-task correlations were found.However, principal component analysis revealed left-right asymmetries to be subdivided in 4 main components, namely asymmetries in size judgements (manual line bisection and landmark), luminance judgements (greyscales), stimulus detection (lateralised visual detection) and judgements of global/local features (manual line bisection and grating scales).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom; School of Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Healthy young adults display a leftward asymmetry of spatial attention ("pseudoneglect") that has been measured with a wide range of different tasks. Yet at present there is a lack of systematic evidence that the tasks commonly used in research today are i) stable measures over time and ii) provide similar measures of spatial bias. Fifty right-handed young adults were tested on five tasks (manual line bisection, landmark, greyscales, gratingscales and lateralised visual detection) on two different days. All five tasks were found to be stable measures of bias over the two testing sessions, indicating that each is a reliable measure in itself. Surprisingly, no strongly significant inter-task correlations were found. However, principal component analysis revealed left-right asymmetries to be subdivided in 4 main components, namely asymmetries in size judgements (manual line bisection and landmark), luminance judgements (greyscales), stimulus detection (lateralised visual detection) and judgements of global/local features (manual line bisection and grating scales). The results align with recent research on hemispatial neglect which conceptualises the condition as multi-component rather than a single pathological deficit of spatial attention. We conclude that spatial biases in judgment of visual stimulus features in healthy adults (e.g., pseudoneglect) is also a multi-component phenomenon that may be captured by variations in task demands which engage task-dependent patterns of activation within the attention network.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus