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Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses.

Gilbert JL, Guthart MJ, Gezan SA, Pisaroglo de Carvalho M, Schwieterman ML, Colquhoun TA, Bartoshuk LM, Sims CA, Clark DG, Olmstead JW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63).Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55).Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Innovation Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America; Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is worthwhile.

No MeSH data available.


Genotypic relatedness based on pedigree and flavor biochemistry.(A) Relationships between genotypes sampled in this study, based on pedigree information (0 = no relation, to 1 = high relationship) with a hierarchical cluster analysis. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrogram indicates relatedness of genotypes. (B) Two-way ward cluster analysis of blueberry genotypes (left) and biochemical measures (bottom). High values are represented as red, average as green, low as blue. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrograms indicate relatedness of genotypes based on metabolite profiles.
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pone.0138494.g001: Genotypic relatedness based on pedigree and flavor biochemistry.(A) Relationships between genotypes sampled in this study, based on pedigree information (0 = no relation, to 1 = high relationship) with a hierarchical cluster analysis. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrogram indicates relatedness of genotypes. (B) Two-way ward cluster analysis of blueberry genotypes (left) and biochemical measures (bottom). High values are represented as red, average as green, low as blue. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrograms indicate relatedness of genotypes based on metabolite profiles.

Mentions: Genotypic relatedness based on pedigree and biochemical profiles were compared using hierarchical cluster analyses (Fig 1). The dendrograms between the two analyses do not pair the same genotypes together in any instance, demonstrating the diversity of biochemistry that exists regardless of genotypic relatedness. This is likely due to the highly heterozygous nature of this autotetraploid species that extends beyond pedigree information. A cluster analysis based on molecular genetic relatedness between these individuals may show more similarity to biochemical clusters, and may be considered in future investigations.


Identifying Breeding Priorities for Blueberry Flavor Using Biochemical, Sensory, and Genotype by Environment Analyses.

Gilbert JL, Guthart MJ, Gezan SA, Pisaroglo de Carvalho M, Schwieterman ML, Colquhoun TA, Bartoshuk LM, Sims CA, Clark DG, Olmstead JW - PLoS ONE (2015)

Genotypic relatedness based on pedigree and flavor biochemistry.(A) Relationships between genotypes sampled in this study, based on pedigree information (0 = no relation, to 1 = high relationship) with a hierarchical cluster analysis. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrogram indicates relatedness of genotypes. (B) Two-way ward cluster analysis of blueberry genotypes (left) and biochemical measures (bottom). High values are represented as red, average as green, low as blue. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrograms indicate relatedness of genotypes based on metabolite profiles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4574478&req=5

pone.0138494.g001: Genotypic relatedness based on pedigree and flavor biochemistry.(A) Relationships between genotypes sampled in this study, based on pedigree information (0 = no relation, to 1 = high relationship) with a hierarchical cluster analysis. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrogram indicates relatedness of genotypes. (B) Two-way ward cluster analysis of blueberry genotypes (left) and biochemical measures (bottom). High values are represented as red, average as green, low as blue. The hierarchy and distance of the dendrograms indicate relatedness of genotypes based on metabolite profiles.
Mentions: Genotypic relatedness based on pedigree and biochemical profiles were compared using hierarchical cluster analyses (Fig 1). The dendrograms between the two analyses do not pair the same genotypes together in any instance, demonstrating the diversity of biochemistry that exists regardless of genotypic relatedness. This is likely due to the highly heterozygous nature of this autotetraploid species that extends beyond pedigree information. A cluster analysis based on molecular genetic relatedness between these individuals may show more similarity to biochemical clusters, and may be considered in future investigations.

Bottom Line: Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63).Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55).Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Plant Innovation Center, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America; Horticultural Sciences Department, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Breeding for a subjective goal such as flavor is challenging, as many blueberry cultivars are grown worldwide, and identifying breeding targets relating to blueberry flavor biochemistry that have a high degree of genetic control and low environmental variability are priorities. A variety of biochemical compounds and physical characters induce the sensory responses of taste, olfaction, and somatosensation, all of which interact to create what is perceived flavor. The goal of this study was to identify the flavor compounds with a larger genetic versus environmental component regulating their expression over an array of cultivars, locations, and years. Over the course of three years, consumer panelists rated overall liking, texture, sweetness, sourness, and flavor intensity of 19 southern highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum hybrids) genotypes in 30 sensory panels. Significant positive correlations to overall liking of blueberry fruit (P<0.001) were found with sweetness (R2 = 0.70), texture (R2 = 0.68), and flavor (R2 = 0.63). Sourness had a significantly negative relationship with overall liking (R2 = 0.55). The relationship between flavor and texture liking was also linear (R2 = 0.73, P<0.0001) demonstrating interaction between olfaction and somatosensation. Partial least squares analysis was used to identify sugars, acids, and volatile compounds contributing to liking and sensory intensities, and revealed strong effects of fructose, pH, and several volatile compounds upon all sensory parameters measured. To assess the feasibility of breeding for flavor components, a three year study was conducted to compare genetic and environmental influences on flavor biochemistry. Panelists could discern genotypic variation in blueberry sensory components, and many of the compounds affecting consumer favor of blueberries, such as fructose, pH, β-caryophyllene oxide and 2-heptanone, were sufficiently genetically controlled that allocating resources for their breeding is worthwhile.

No MeSH data available.