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Reduced Inhibition of Return to Food Images in Obese Individuals.

Carters MA, Rieger E, Bell J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The present study sought to extend our understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in this population by investigating whether obese individuals have difficulty in disengaging attention from food compared with non-food images, relative to normal-weight controls.The obese group displayed less IOR to food images than the normal-weight group, while there was no difference in IOR between the groups for non-food images.This suggests that obese females have greater difficulty disengaging attention from food than normal-weight females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research School of Psychology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has shown that obese individuals may be biased towards attending to food over non-food information, and this bias may contribute to the development and/or maintenance of obesity. The present study sought to extend our understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in this population by investigating whether obese individuals have difficulty in disengaging attention from food compared with non-food images, relative to normal-weight controls. To address this question, we measured inhibition of return (IOR) in an attentional cueing task. The participants were 29 obese and 35 normal-weight satiated females without eating disorders. The obese group displayed less IOR to food images than the normal-weight group, while there was no difference in IOR between the groups for non-food images. This suggests that obese females have greater difficulty disengaging attention from food than normal-weight females. Our findings provide a new focus for studies investigating maintenance factors in obesity and are discussed in relation to a theory of incentive-sensitisation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The interaction between group and picture type on arousal ratings of the food and non-food images. Error bars: +/- one standard error of the mean.
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pone.0137821.g004: The interaction between group and picture type on arousal ratings of the food and non-food images. Error bars: +/- one standard error of the mean.

Mentions: The interaction was clarified firstly by a one-tailed independent samples t-test that revealed a significant difference across groups for the food images, t(62) = -1.83, p = .036, suggesting that the obese group rated the food images as more arousing than did the normal-weight group. The magnitude of the differences in the means (mean difference = -9, 95% CI: -18.86 to .84) was moderate (η2 = .051). The second t-test showed no significant difference between the obese and normal-weight groups for the non-food images, t(62) = -.32, p = .376. The magnitude of the differences in the means (mean difference = -1.61, 95% CI: -11.76 to 8.54) was very small (η2 = .002). Fig 4 shows the arousal rating for the two groups for the two picture types.


Reduced Inhibition of Return to Food Images in Obese Individuals.

Carters MA, Rieger E, Bell J - PLoS ONE (2015)

The interaction between group and picture type on arousal ratings of the food and non-food images. Error bars: +/- one standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4574472&req=5

pone.0137821.g004: The interaction between group and picture type on arousal ratings of the food and non-food images. Error bars: +/- one standard error of the mean.
Mentions: The interaction was clarified firstly by a one-tailed independent samples t-test that revealed a significant difference across groups for the food images, t(62) = -1.83, p = .036, suggesting that the obese group rated the food images as more arousing than did the normal-weight group. The magnitude of the differences in the means (mean difference = -9, 95% CI: -18.86 to .84) was moderate (η2 = .051). The second t-test showed no significant difference between the obese and normal-weight groups for the non-food images, t(62) = -.32, p = .376. The magnitude of the differences in the means (mean difference = -1.61, 95% CI: -11.76 to 8.54) was very small (η2 = .002). Fig 4 shows the arousal rating for the two groups for the two picture types.

Bottom Line: The present study sought to extend our understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in this population by investigating whether obese individuals have difficulty in disengaging attention from food compared with non-food images, relative to normal-weight controls.The obese group displayed less IOR to food images than the normal-weight group, while there was no difference in IOR between the groups for non-food images.This suggests that obese females have greater difficulty disengaging attention from food than normal-weight females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research School of Psychology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Previous research has shown that obese individuals may be biased towards attending to food over non-food information, and this bias may contribute to the development and/or maintenance of obesity. The present study sought to extend our understanding of maladaptive attentional processing in this population by investigating whether obese individuals have difficulty in disengaging attention from food compared with non-food images, relative to normal-weight controls. To address this question, we measured inhibition of return (IOR) in an attentional cueing task. The participants were 29 obese and 35 normal-weight satiated females without eating disorders. The obese group displayed less IOR to food images than the normal-weight group, while there was no difference in IOR between the groups for non-food images. This suggests that obese females have greater difficulty disengaging attention from food than normal-weight females. Our findings provide a new focus for studies investigating maintenance factors in obesity and are discussed in relation to a theory of incentive-sensitisation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus