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Entomological Monitoring and Evaluation: Diverse Transmission Settings of ICEMR Projects Will Require Local and Regional Malaria Elimination Strategies.

Conn JE, Norris DE, Donnelly MJ, Beebe NW, Burkot TR, Coulibaly MB, Chery L, Eapen A, Keven JB, Kilama M, Kumar A, Lindsay SW, Moreno M, Quinones M, Reimer LJ, Russell TL, Smith DL, Thomas MB, Walker ED, Wilson ML, Yan G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2015)

Bottom Line: This switch of emphasis from universal coverage to universal coverage plus additional interventions will be reliant on improved entomological monitoring and evaluation.In this article, we contrast the differing ecology and transmission settings across the ICEMR study locations.In South America, Africa, and Asia, vector biologists are already dealing with many of the issues of pushing to elimination such as highly focal transmission, proportionate increase in the importance of outdoor and crepuscular biting, vector species complexity, and "sub patent" vector transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York; Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany, New York; The W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, The Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Malaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom; The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Brisbane, Australia; James Cook University, Cairns, Australia; Malaria Research and Training Centre, Faculty of Medicine Pharmacy and Dentistry, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako, Bamako, Mali; Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; National Institute of Malaria Research, National Institute of Epidemiology Campus Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Madang, Papua New Guinea; Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, Uganda; National Institute of Malaria Research, Field Unit Goa, Goa, India; School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom; Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California; George Palade Labs, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California; Public Health Department, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia; Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka and Madang, Papua New Guinea; Pacific Malaria Initiative Support Centre, School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Australia; Australian Centre for Tropical and International Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Australi

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Location of the 33 field sites across 10 International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) (in red). The field sites (yellow circles) are numbered consecutively and are described in Table 1.
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Figure 1: Location of the 33 field sites across 10 International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) (in red). The field sites (yellow circles) are numbered consecutively and are described in Table 1.

Mentions: The United States' National Institutes of Health funded 10 International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) in 2010 with a series of common aims including a concerted effort to closely link epidemiology and transmission metrics with vector biology. One of the unique features of the ICEMR program is the focus on longitudinal surveillance sites in diverse epidemiological settings across the globe (Figure 1Figure 1.


Entomological Monitoring and Evaluation: Diverse Transmission Settings of ICEMR Projects Will Require Local and Regional Malaria Elimination Strategies.

Conn JE, Norris DE, Donnelly MJ, Beebe NW, Burkot TR, Coulibaly MB, Chery L, Eapen A, Keven JB, Kilama M, Kumar A, Lindsay SW, Moreno M, Quinones M, Reimer LJ, Russell TL, Smith DL, Thomas MB, Walker ED, Wilson ML, Yan G - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2015)

Location of the 33 field sites across 10 International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) (in red). The field sites (yellow circles) are numbered consecutively and are described in Table 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4574272&req=5

Figure 1: Location of the 33 field sites across 10 International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) (in red). The field sites (yellow circles) are numbered consecutively and are described in Table 1.
Mentions: The United States' National Institutes of Health funded 10 International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMR) in 2010 with a series of common aims including a concerted effort to closely link epidemiology and transmission metrics with vector biology. One of the unique features of the ICEMR program is the focus on longitudinal surveillance sites in diverse epidemiological settings across the globe (Figure 1Figure 1.

Bottom Line: This switch of emphasis from universal coverage to universal coverage plus additional interventions will be reliant on improved entomological monitoring and evaluation.In this article, we contrast the differing ecology and transmission settings across the ICEMR study locations.In South America, Africa, and Asia, vector biologists are already dealing with many of the issues of pushing to elimination such as highly focal transmission, proportionate increase in the importance of outdoor and crepuscular biting, vector species complexity, and "sub patent" vector transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, New York; Department of Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, State University of New York, Albany, New York; The W. Harry Feinstone Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, The Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Department of Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Malaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom; The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Brisbane, Australia; James Cook University, Cairns, Australia; Malaria Research and Training Centre, Faculty of Medicine Pharmacy and Dentistry, University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies of Bamako, Bamako, Mali; Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; National Institute of Malaria Research, National Institute of Epidemiology Campus Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India; Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Madang, Papua New Guinea; Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, Uganda; National Institute of Malaria Research, Field Unit Goa, Goa, India; School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom; Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California; George Palade Labs, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California; Public Health Department, Faculty of Medicine, National University of Colombia, Bogotá, Colombia; Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka and Madang, Papua New Guinea; Pacific Malaria Initiative Support Centre, School of Population Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Australia; Australian Centre for Tropical and International Health, University of Queensland, Herston, Australi

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Related in: MedlinePlus